Katherine Langford Says This $14 Mascara Is Everything

Just as it is! But also for coming on my hair color journey with me.

How do you keep your hair in such great shape since you do tend to switch up your hair color?

A good leave-in conditioner. When I went blonde with L’Oréal, I used the EverPure Blonde Collection to maintain the color and also keep it protected and healthy, which really worked. You’ve got to be really thoughtful when you go blonde with the products you choose, and also the after-care. And I’m a big fan of their Elnett hair spray because it’s a staple and an easy buy at the drugstore.

L’Oréal Paris EverPure Blonde Shampoo

L’Oréal Paris EverPure Blonde Conditioner

$8

L’Oreal Paris

L’Oréal Elnett Satin Extra Strong Hold Hair Spray

$15

L’Oreal Paris

What city or country that gives you the greatest beauty inspiration?

Australia and France. To me there’s a real earthiness to Australian beauty. When I go home, I just feel better, my skin is better, and there’s sun and the ocean. When I visited France, there’s that same appreciation for natural beauty, and it’s also so much about how you carry yourself. I also really love the contrast of the underground looks you see in Paris as well as Japan, although I’m still waiting for a chance to visit.

You can only use three products for the rest of your life. What are they?

SPF is a big one, even in winter. I make sure I’m always wearing it. I use a mixture. I’ve used the Dermalogica one, but also Kate Somerville SPF 50. We have this saying in Australia called “slip, slop, slap”—you slip on a t-shirt, slop on some sunscreen, and slap on a hat, and you learn that basically from the age of three. For my second product, Colour Riche rouge lipstick and then finally, Air Volume Mega Mascara because it’s impactful and easy to wear.

Dermalogica Invisible Physical Defense Sunscreen SPF 30

$45

Dermalogica

Kate Somerville SPF50 Soft Focus Makeup Setting Spray

$40

Kate Somerville

L’Oréal Colour Riche Matte Lipstick

$10

L’Oreal Paris

L’Oréal Air Volume Mega Mascara

$14

L’Oreal

What colors are you loving on your nails right now?

I’ve had natural nails for quite some time now, but I just started playing around with pinks and other spring colors because of the warmer weather. I also love a red nail and nail art.

What’s your go-to perfume?

I really like fragrance, so I’ve been a Tom Ford wearer for a couple of years now. I’ve also been recently mixing it up with a couple other fragrances—including one from Valentino.

What’s your favorite way to take a moment for yourself?

The beach. Or if I’m not near the ocean, then a trip to the park. I’m fascinated by squirrels, because we don’t have them where I grew up.

Would you rather get a facial or a massage?

A massage. I did this show a couple years ago now, and it was really grueling on my body, so I would get a massage once a week while we were filming. It really chilled me out, but it’s also a good thing to be able to do with your body and a really nice act of self care.

If you could change one thing about beauty perceptions, what would it be?

If I could, I’d change the lens. Beauty is perceived differently by each person, but when you have a very select idea of what beauty is, it limits that view. I’m really excited to live in a time when more female directors are being recognized for their work and are being a part of challenging those typical beauty standards that have existed for so long. I also think it’s important to understand that beauty doesn’t just exist as a visual sense.

Who are the women inspiring you the most right now?

Jacinda Ardern, the Prime Minister of New Zealand. What a leader! She’s not only navigated New Zealand through the pandemic, but she’s also closing the gender gap and pioneering equality legislation. It sets a great example for what can be accomplished, but also what so many other countries are missing out on when the population is misrepresented.

Jessica Radloff is the Glamour West Coast editor. Follow her on Instagram at @jessicaradloff14.

Kathryn Hahn Wants Every Woman to Know That Aging Is Power

Kathryn Hahn makes people happy. Seeing her on screen feels like noticing an old friend’s name in your unread texts, or getting a surprise package in the mail—it’s just an instant glow of endorphins. She has a unique effect, different from any other celebrity. It’s like she’s a human conductor of warmth and hopefulness. We never know what kind of character to expect, but we know how she will make us feel.

During the pandemic, the 47-year-old actor unwittingly became a coping mechanism for millions of people as Agnes (or, spoiler, malevolent witch Agatha Harkness) in Wandavision on Disney Plus. Fans latched on to her performance—in one short series, she became a sitcom star, a Billboard charting singer, a Marvel villain, and a meme. For longtime fans of Hahn it felt like the world was finally getting to know our favorite person—Parks and Recreation’s soulless, sparkling political consultant, the vulnerable Rabbi Raquel of Transparent, the hot mess of Bad Moms, the sexually powerful suburbanite on Mrs. Fletcher.

Such is the reach of Disney, the caliber of Wandavision, the charisma of Kathryn—the whole world was enchanted. We copied her wink, we sang along with her theme song, we were transfixed by her giant, lustrous hair. She made us feel happy.

What makes Kathryn Hahn happy? Since the Wandavision finale, fans have been demanding answers—does she want her character to come back in a spinoff? (She’s said she would love to.) Is she bummed out to reach new heights of celebrity during a pandemic? (She’s sad not to be able to meet fans, but she’s enjoying her kids, dogs, and foster kittens.) Doesn’t she deserve her own starring role? (She’s already had several, and she should have even more!)

But how does the woman who always entertains us entertain herself? For the latest installment of Glamour’s Your Fave’s Faves, she told us the books, TV shows, lip balms, and Wandavision style looks she loves most. And in a moment of wide-eyed, open hearted, classic Kathryn Hahn generosity, she shared her philosophy on the beauty of aging as a woman. 

What people should watch if they want to see some of my best work

I love I Love Dick. I’m very proud of that show. I think it was before its time in a lot of ways, and not a lot of people have seen it. It’s Kevin Bacon and Griffin Dunne and myself and Roberta Colindrez—it’s a fabulous cast, and it’s based on a fabulous piece of writing.

Where I get my confidence

It is so ironic because there are moments when I feel very confident and moments when I feel not confident at all. I wish I could have told this to my younger self: The older I have gotten, the more it feels like a space shuttle—you know how a space stuff just starts to shed its stuff as it’s going into outer space, and you’re just left with a fiery ball? That’s what it feels like to get older. It’s kind of thrilling to me, and I wish every young woman knew that. That it just boils to the essentials. Instead of feeling invisible, which is what I thought it would feel like, it’s more essential and more hot. It’s really exciting. It feels like there’s a very—ironically—fertile chapter ahead.

The last great book I read

Normal People and Conversations with Friends by Sally Rooney. I did both of them at the same time. She’s amazing.

“Normal People” by Sally Rooney

“Conversations With Friends” by Sally Rooney

My favorite TV shows to binge-watch right now

I loved Unorthodox and I Can’t Get You Out Of My Head, which is the Adam Curtis documentary series on YouTube. It’s produced by the BBC, and it’s extraordinary. I highly recommend.

Favorite household product

I hate cleaning but have to have a clean space for my mental health. We have two rescue dogs, we’re fostering kittens, and we have two kids. The longer we’ve spent inside in this pandemic, the more I’ll see buildup and grime, especially in my shower. I’ve fallen in love with the bathroom cleaner and the multi-purpose cleaner from 9 Elements. I was so sick of the smell of bleach, and this smells delicious. It’s like essential oils, lemon, and eucalyptus; it’s also mostly plant-based, and it was created by two women scientists. This is what I’ve been using in my bathroom—it really cuts through the hard water and scum that’s on your shower head. [Editor’s note: Hahn is partnering with P&G and 9 Elements.] 

9 Elements Lemon Bathroom Cleaner 3-Pack

9 Elements Eucalyptus Laundry Detergent 2-Pack

The products that keep my hair healthy

It’s expensive, but I really love Moroccan Oil on the ends. I have to have it. And then as a treat I will use the Leonor Greyl hair mask; I’ll just put it in a bun, leave it in all day long, and then rinse it out at the end of the day.

Moroccanoil Treatment

$34

Moroccanoil

Leonor Greyl Masque Quintessence

$147

Leonor Greyl

How I cleared my adult acne

It was cystic and would be once a month hormonally, a big old honker. You could tell the time by the shadow it was causing on my face. It was a sundial! So I did a low, low dose of Accutane for about a half a year, and it really knocked it out. It was not fun, but it really knocked it out. [To deal with dryness, which can be a side effect of Accutane] I used By Terry Lip Balm, which is not inexpensive, but it really saved my lips. And then EltaMD PM face cream was helpful.

By Terry Baume de Rose

$60

By Terry

EltaMD PM Therapy Facial Moisturizer

$35

EltaMD PM

My favorite Wandavision look 

Oh the ‘80s, for sure.

The product my family always wants to steal

This kind of stuff [gesturing at her makeup] I never wear in my real life. My daughter loves a lipstick—she’s not allowed to wear it out ever, but she loves to try it on, to play around. She likes the art of it, but only for fun. I’m really enjoying what I’m wearing now; it’s by a brand called 19/99, it’s a lip liner worn as a lipstick. I’m really into an orange-y lip liner.

19/99 Precision Colour Pencil

$26

Verishop

My most woo-woo wellness ritual

Every Sunday, with a couple of friends, we have something called Stretch Church. It’s just a Zoom with this awesome teacher, but we try to commit to it every week, and I look forward to it like a massage. We try to open up, stretch-wise, and it’s been really helpful.

Jenny Singer is a staff writer for Glamour. You can follow her on Twitter. 

Beyoncé and Jay-Z Just Celebrated 13 Years of Marriage With a Trip to Vegas

Lucky number 13! The most powerful couple in music, Beyoncé and Jay-Z, just celebrated 13 years of marriage with a quick trip to Las Vegas, as you do.

The “Drunk in Love” spouses got married on April 4, 2008. You can catch a glimpse of their wedding—plus other sweet, candid moments from their relationship—in the “Die With You” video, released on their ninth anniversary:

This year, Bey didn’t drop a video, but she did share photos from their two-person party. In a series of snaps called “Sin City” and posted to her website, Bey and Jay-Z are shown taking a private jet and dining at Cipriani Vegas.

She also showed off her tweed and tights outfit, bejeweled clutch purse, and reflective sunglasses. This is a look Cher Horowitz would approve of, and obviously we love it, too. JustJared reports that the ensemble is by Alessandra Rich, in case you want to snap one up for yourself.

Beyoncé seemed especially into her red shoes with a black ribbon. I’m literally begging for a reason to wear (a knock-off version of) this outfit post-pandemic. Might just make one up!

It looks like the power couple left their three kids, Blue Ivy, Rumi, and Sir, at home while they went on their special date. But like many families, the Knowles-Carters have been getting plenty of time together during the pandemic. Mom and daughter recently won Grammy Awards together, and then the “Black Is King” singer took her kids out for a beach day. Bey said at the Grammys about her kids, “I know my daughter is watching. Two daughters and my son, y’all are all watching. Congratulations, Blue. She won a Grammy tonight. I’m so proud of you, and I’m so honored to be your mommy, all of your mommies. Y’all are my babies. And I’m so proud of y’all. I love you so much, my rock. Enjoy your night. Thank you.” 

Congratulations on 13 years together, Bey and Jay!

Prince Harry and Prince William Just Released Statements About Prince Philip’s Passing

Following the death of the Duke of Edinburgh on Friday, April 9, two of his grandsons, Prince Harry and Prince William, have each posted a statement about how much Prince Philip meant to them as a grandfather.

“My grandfather was a man of service, honour, and great humour. He was authentically himself, with a seriously sharp wit, and could hold the attention of any room due to his charm – and also because you never knew what he might say next,” wrote Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, in a statement released to the media. “He was my grandpa: master of the barbecue, legend of banter, and cheeky right ‘til the end.” 

Prince William, meanwhile, shared a message via his family’s Instagram account. “My grandfather’s century of life was defined by service – to his country and Commonwealth, to his wife and Queen, and to our family,” he wrote.

He continued, “I feel lucky to have not just had his example to guide me, but his enduring presence well into my own adult life – both through good times and the hardest days. I will always be grateful that my wife had so many years to get to know my grandfather and for the kindness he showed her. I will never take for granted the special memories my children will always have of their great-grandpa coming to collect them in his carriage and seeing for themselves his infectious sense of adventure as well as his mischievous sense of humour!”

Prince William then added, “My grandfather was an extraordinary man and part of an extraordinary generation. Catherine and I will continue to do what he would have wanted and will support The Queen in the years ahead. I will miss my Grandpa, but I know he would want us to get on with the job.”

Prince William and Prince Harry are both expected to attend Prince Philip’s funeral, which will be held on April 17.

Thunder Force on Netflix Is Dividing the Internet

Thunder Force, a new superhero comedy starring Melissa McCarthy and Octavia Spencer, is currently the number-one movie on Netflix. But that doesn’t mean everyone who streamed it loved it. In fact, it has viewers divided. Some say it’s enjoyable and heartwarming; others were not as kind. 

A few straight-up think the movie isn’t funny, which is subjective. One viewer harshly called it “painfully unfunny and cringeworthy.” Another critic tweeted he’d “rather eat raw chicken than recommend it to anyone.” Oof. Even those with low expectations were disappointed.

Of course, it’s important to look out for misogyny in these dunks. Twitter is flooded with reviews from men who aren’t just put off by this movie: They’re disgusted by it—all over the high crime of…not being good. 

Which, listen, it might not be. Thunder Force has a 24% critical rating on Rotten Tomatoes and a 25% audience rating. But why is everyone nitpicking a movie that’s just supposed to be fun? One viewer called it “the perfect bit of joy to end my work week and kick off the weekend!” Maybe that’s the vibe everyone should expect going in: silly, goofy, relaxing.

If expect Thunder Force to resemble a Marvel or DC movie, you’re bound to be disappointed. It’s way less self-serious than that. 

One aspect of the movie everyone seems to agree on: Jason Bateman as the crab-handed villain. His performance “made the movie” for one viewer

“I’m still not over that dinner date scene with Jason Bateman,” tweeted another. 

“So glad Jason Bateman as a crab man has entered my consciousness,” posted a third. “Thank you to everyone who made #ThunderForce.”

And yes, there is a fan cam.

Whatever its flaws, Thunder Force is at the top of the Netflix charts. Maybe you’ll just have to watch it for yourself to find out what all the fuss is about.

Joseph Siravo, Sopranos and Jersey Boys Star, Has Passed Away

Tributes to Tyson from celebrities soon flooded the internet: 

Double K

The rapper from duo People Under the Stairs passed away at 43 years old. 

Larry King

King passed in late January 2021 at 87 years old; he had been hospitalized with COVID-19 over the holidays. Ora Media, the media company cofounded by King, announced the news on January 23. “For 63 years and across the platforms of radio, television, and digital media, Larry’s many thousands of interviews, awards, and global acclaim stand as a testament to his unique and lasting talent as a broadcaster,” a statement read. 

Journalists in particular took to social media to talk about how King influenced them: 

Cloris Leachman

The Young Frankenstein and Mary Tyler Moore Show actor passed away at 94 years old from natural causes. “There was no one like Cloris,” her manager, Juliet Green, told Page Six. “With a single look she had the ability to break your heart or make you laugh ’till the tears ran down your face. You never knew what Cloris was going to say or do, and that unpredictable quality was part of her unparalleled magic.”

Joanne Rogers

Rogers, a pianist and widow of TV legend Fred Rogers, passed at 92 years old. “Fred Rogers Productions is deeply saddened by the passing of Joanne Rogers,” the organization said in a statement, per People. “The loving partner of Fred Rogers for more than 50 years, she continued their shared commitment to supporting children and families after his death as chair of the board of Fred Rogers Productions.”

Deezer D

Known for playing Malik McGrath on ER, Deezer D passed away January 7 at 55 years old. 

Marion Ramsey 

The actor, famous for her roles on Broadway and the film Police Academy, passed on January 7 at 73 years old. 

Ed Bruce 

On January 8, the country music legend passed away from natural causes. 

John Reilly 

The General Hospital and Beverly Hills, 90210 star died on January 10 at 84 years old. 

Sylvain Sylvain 

The New York Dolls guitarist died at 69 years old. “As most of you know, Sylvain battled cancer for the past two and 1/2 years,” his wife, Wanda O’Kelley Mizrahi, wrote in a Facebook post. “Though he fought it valiantly, yesterday he passed away from this disease. While we grieve his loss, we know that he is finally at peace and out of pain.”

Harry Brant

The 24-year-old son of model and actor Stephanie Seymour and magazine publisher Peter Brant passed away at 24 years old from an accidental overdose. “We will forever be saddened that his life was cut short by this devastating disease,” the family said in a statement to The New York Times. “He achieved a lot in his 24 years, but we will never get the chance to see how much more Harry could have done.”

Sonny Fox 

The beloved host of Wonderama, a popular 1960s children’s show, died at 95 from coronavirus complications. “It is with sadness that we share the news of Sonny’s passing in Los Angeles on Sunday, January 24th, of Covid Related Pneumonia,” a statement reads. “We will post more as we learn more of where to send your condolences.”

Song Yoo-jung

The South Korean actor and model died at 26. “Actress Song Yoo-jung has left us,” Sublime Artist Agency wrote in the caption, translated by CNN. “Yoo-jung was a friend who always gave us happiness with a bright smile, and an awesome actress who acted with a passion bigger than anyone.”

Rest in peace to all the celebrities who died in 2021. 

Orthodox Jewish Women Can’t Sing In Front of Men. Instagram Is Giving Them a Voice

The balance is a fine one, and the scrutiny microscopic—one wrong move, and you’re easily dismissed. When a popular Orthodox women’s magazine reached out to interview Kosman, she was excited: Finally, some attention in the community publications for women’s music! But after the profile was written, a magazine editor emailed: The staff had watched her latest music video, and found it “disturbing,” the editor wrote somberly. The sin: The video’s background dancers had hems above their knees—not according to community modesty standards. The story was killed.

With or without external stamps of approval, though, social media has allowed these women to take their messages into their own hands, and push boundaries, too.

In my sister-in-law’s latest song, “If you wanna be,” she and rapper-poet Rachel Sam channel Lady Gaga in modest clothing—gilded thrones, white wigs, bright lipstick, boxing gloves and punching bags—angst, materialism, and spiritual aspirations collide. “I thought to myself, let me choose something from the Ethics of the Fathers,” Kosman says, referring to a rabbinic text. “It’s a preachy text, so I thought it would go well with rap.”

Unlike most of her colleagues, Kosman—who now does podcast production, because “music doesn’t pay”—chooses not to label her songs as “for women only.”

“I’m not responsible for how people use it,” she says. “I label it ‘kol isha’ instead of ‘women only’—for me, it’s like, allergen information. I’m not going to tell who should and shouldn’t listen to it.”

Kosman’s collaborator, Rachel Sam, is a single mother of three. She speaks to me via video chat from her car, her baby sleeping in the back seat. She’s wearing bright red lipstick and a mustard yellow beanie, a clip-on auburn bang of hair peeking out of the hat.

Sam was always a rapper at heart, growing up in a Lubavitch Hasidic family in Milwaukee. She has a slightly different take on the religious music industry.

“I don’t like the toxic positivity vibe, ‘Have hope, God is here for you,’” she says. “It’s overused, and there’s not always hope. I am upset with what God has done to me in life. But I couldn’t keep going without my faith, too.” She goes on, “I feel like rap is this constructive genre to channel those emotions, a medium where the anger can be most palpably conveyed.” Now, Sam is asked to perform at Sabbath tables and conferences for rabbis’ wives; one ladies’ charity dinner in Crown Heights found her performing a rap on stage with a nursing newborn in her arms, her long wig and nursing cover swaying with her.

Sam’s forthcoming song is on domestic violence; breathlessly, she dives into the rap on the video call with me: “‘Pave that road to a place she didn’t know exists, the one where she deserves all the happiness.” And then, as if awakening from a reverie, she cuts herself off: “Sorry if I’m too intense there,” and a laugh.

For Jessica Roda, the Georgetown professor, the religious women’s musical industry embodies a broader change in the community. “It’s something bigger than just a change of music,” she tells me. “It’s a change of how women can be, what women can do. A lot of these women were artists who didn’t fit into the traditional role model. They were in the margins, but the margins are coming much more to the center.”

Rap seems to be growing in popularity among young religious women, as a platform for poetry that is considerably sharper, and that may be deemed not singing, according to Jewish law, and therefore music that men can listen to.

What Lies Below on Netflix Has a Baffling Ending, and We Must Discuss

If you watched What Lies Below on Netflix and are still scratching your head over that ending, you’re not alone. The thriller, originally released in December, has found new life on the streaming platform, joining the ranks of other soapy, viral thrillers like Deadly Illusions and Fatal Affair. This sub-genre has almost become a signature for Netflix; they’re movies that don’t necessarily have critical acclaim but are highly watchable thanks to bonkers plot points, campy acting, and Lifetime-esque melodrama. 

What Lies Below has all those things and also, as a bonus, mermen! Or Aliens! Or some other indiscernible extraterrestrial monster. It’s not made clear specifically what John (Trey Tucker) is, but we know he’s emerged from the water to wreak havoc on Michelle (Mena Suvari) and her daughter, Libby (Ema Horvath). 

But they don’t know that. To Michelle, John is just a hunky, bearded, Speedo-wearing 30-year-old who’s appeared out of nowhere to woo her. So what if he spends hours in her basement working on spooky “aquatic geneticist” things? Look at his shoulders! 

When Libby comes home from camp and meets John, she’s cool with him at first, but then things get weird. Like, creepy-uncomfortable-WTF-is-happening weird. There’s an incident on a boat where Libby gets her period, then he licks her mensural blood. He then spies on her in the shower and sniffs the shirt he used to wipe up said blood. It’s all very disturbing and confusing. 

And it just keeps getting more disturbing and confusing. By the end, you’re not sure what’s going on—just that John is bad, he’s imprisoned and impregnated Michelle, and Libby needs to save the day.

But she doesn’t. In a bizarre, unfortunate twist of events, Michelle dies and Libby is kidnapped by John and a bunch of other scary mermen/aliens who look like him. He then injects some blue light into her and she wakes up in a diamond-shaped cell that’s submerged in water. At first, she freaks out because the tank is filling up. But then she…smiles? Boom, ending, roll credits. What is happening?

Ema Horvath and Trey Tucker in What Lies Below.

Courtesy Everett Collection

Orthodox Jewish Women Can’t Sing In Front of Men. Instagram Is Changing That

The balance is a fine one, and the scrutiny microscopic—one wrong move, and you’re easily dismissed. When a popular Orthodox women’s magazine reached out to interview Kosman, she was excited: Finally, some attention in the community publications for women’s music! But after the profile was written, a magazine editor emailed: The staff had watched her latest music video, and found it “disturbing,” the editor wrote somberly. The sin: The video’s background dancers had hems above their knees—not according to community modesty standards. The story was killed.

With or without external stamps of approval, though, social media has allowed these women to take their messages into their own hands, and push boundaries, too.

In my sister-in-law’s latest song, “If you wanna be,” she and rapper-poet Rochel Sam channel Lady Gaga in modest clothing—gilded thrones, white wigs, bright lipstick, boxing gloves and punching bags—angst, materialism, and spiritual aspirations collide. “I thought to myself, let me choose something from the Ethics of the Fathers,” Kosman says, referring to a rabbinic text. “It’s a preachy text, so I thought it would go well with rap.”

Unlike most of her colleagues, Kosman—who now does podcast production, because “music doesn’t pay”—chooses not to label her songs as “for women only.”

“I’m not responsible for how people use it,” she says. “I label it ‘kol isha’ instead of ‘women only’—for me, it’s like, allergen information. I’m not going to tell who should and shouldn’t listen to it.”

Kosman’s collaborator, Rochel Sam, is a single mother of three. She speaks to me via video chat from her car, her baby sleeping in the back seat. She’s wearing bright red lipstick and a mustard yellow beanie, a clip-on auburn bang of hair peeking out of the hat.

Sam was always a rapper at heart, growing up in a Lubavitch Hasidic family in Milwaukee. She has a slightly different take on the religious music industry.

“I don’t like the toxic positivity vibe, ‘Have hope, God is here for you,’” she says. “It’s overused, and there’s not always hope. I am upset with what God has done to me in life. But I couldn’t keep going without my faith, too.” She goes on, “I feel like rap is this constructive genre to channel those emotions, a medium where the anger can be most palpably conveyed.” Now, Sam is asked to perform at Sabbath tables and conferences for rabbis’ wives; one ladies’ charity dinner in Crown Heights found her performing a rap on stage with a nursing newborn in her arms, her long wig and nursing cover swaying with her.

Sam’s forthcoming song is on domestic violence; breathlessly, she dives into the rap on the video call with me: “‘Pave that road to a place she didn’t know exists, the one where she deserves all the happiness.” And then, as if awakening from a reverie, she cuts herself off: “Sorry if I’m too intense there,” and a laugh.

For Jessica Roda, the Georgetown professor, the religious women’s musical industry embodies a broader change in the community. “It’s something bigger than just a change of music,” she tells me. “It’s a change of how women can be, what women can do. A lot of these women were artists who didn’t fit into the traditional role model. They were in the margins, but the margins are coming much more to the center.”

Rap seems to be growing in popularity among young religious women, as a platform for poetry that is considerably sharper, and that may be deemed not singing, according to Jewish law, and therefore music that men can listen to.

The Best Looks From the 2021 BAFTA Awards

As this somewhat strange awards season rolls on, the 2021 BAFTA Awards are actually being held in person (for the most part). 

The two-night event, which kicked off on April 10, is hosted by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts and boasts an enviable guest list: Priyanka Chopra, Nick Jonas, Bridgerton’s Phoebe Dynevor,  Cynthia Erivo, James McAvoy, Felicity Jones, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Tom Hiddleston, and more are attending in person, while other celebrities like Rose Byrne, Andra Day, Anna Kendrick, and Renée Zellweger will Zoom in. Thankfully, the red carpet looks at the Royal Albert Hall in London are living up to expectations.

While Kate Middleton and Prince William typically attend the star-studded event, the Duke of Cambridge had planned to attend solo this year. Sadly, he had to cancel after the death of his grandfather, Prince Philip, on April 9.

Despite the lack of royals in attendance, everyone is bringing their fashion A-game. Chopra showed out in two fierce ensembles, while The Crown star Vanessa Kirby’s Louis Vuitton dress appears to be made of liquid metal. 

The events are still in full swing, but here are the best looks from the 2021 BAFTA Awards so far. 

Priyanka Chopra in Bulgari and Nick Jonas in Giorgio Armani

Getty

Anna Kendrick in Zuhair Murad

Getty

Cynthia Erivo in Louis Vuitton

Getty

Gugu Mbatha-Raw in Louis Vuitton

Getty

Vanessa Kirby in Versace

Zoe McConnell

Phoebe Dyvenor in Louis Vuitton

Getty

Maria Bakalova in Giorgio Armani

Leslie Odom Jr. in Versace

Austin Hargrave

Dominique Fishback

Marcus Ingram