Guide to Knotless Braids: Cost, Upkeep & Best Braid Ideas

    The price can average anywhere from $160 to more than $600—with longer braids with smaller thickness being at the higher end of the price range. For example, at Oludele’s Brooklyn salon, knotless box braids installation starts at $250. If that number looks steep to you, trust us, it’s worth it. “You’re paying for no tension, for the extensions, and how they’re installed,” says Oludele. “All of that comes into perspective for your service.” 

    How do you care for knotless box braids?

    Maintaining your box braids once they’ve been installed is similar to other protective styles. Use a leave-in spray, oils on your scalp, and make sure you tie your hair back at night, advises Oludele. “Even though your hair is intertwined with the extensions, most of your hair is more exposed, so you want to take precaution by tying back your hair,” she says. Sleeping on a silk pillowcase or wearing a silk scarf will also help preserve your hair at night.

    How long do knotless box braids last?

    Knotless box braids last for between two to three months with in-salon maintenance, according to Oludele who recommends clients come in after one or two months of wearing knotless box braids. “We touch up your edges, here you part your hair because that is the most sensitive part of your hair, cleanse the scalp, and that will last you another month” she explains. That said, Oludele emphasises that length of time varies based on how you care for your hair.

    Miss Hair and Humor agrees, stating that “it isn’t about how long braids can last, it’s about the suggested timeframe a client should keep them installed.” She always suggests a time frame of 6-8 weeks maximum because, in her opinion, “the longer the style is in, the longer clients typically neglect their own hair. It’s important to stay on a strict schedule for a protective style and not only use hair as an anchor.” Regardless of how long you keep your knotless box braids in, be sure to not neglect your scalp and handle build up right away.

    The best knotless box braids ideas

    If you’re looking for the best knotless box braids ideas, Ms. Hair and Humor and Susan Oludele’s Instagrams are a great place to start. Because knotless box braids are so versatile, the sky is kind of the limit here, folks. Other star stylists with active feeds full of inspiration include @creativexhands, @nikkinelms, and @vernonfrancois, but if you want a quick overview of some of our favorite looks, just scroll on down below. You truly can’t go wrong with any of these.

    Amber Rambharose is a beauty writer in Philadelphia. Follow her on Instagram @amberdeexterous

    Guide to Knotless Braids: Cost, Upkeep and Best Braid Ideas

    The price can average anywhere from $160 to more than $600—longer braids with less thickness are at the higher end of the price range. For example, at Oludele’s Brooklyn salon, knotless box braids installation starts at $250. If that number looks steep to you, trust us, it’s worth it. “You’re paying for no tension, for the extensions, and how they’re installed,” says Oludele. “All of that comes into perspective for your service.” 

    How do you care for knotless box braids?

    Maintaining your box braids once they’ve been installed is similar to other protective styles. Use a leave-in spray and oils on your scalp, and make sure you tie your hair back at night, advises Oludele. “Even though your hair is intertwined with the extensions, most of your hair is more exposed, so you want to take precaution by tying back your hair,” she says. Sleeping on a silk pillowcase or wearing a silk scarf will also help preserve your hair at night.

    How long do knotless box braids last?

    Knotless box braids last for between two to three months with salon maintenance, according to Oludele, who recommends clients come in after one or two months of wearing knotless box braids. “We touch up your edges, where you part your hair because that is the most sensitive part of your hair, cleanse the scalp, and that will last you another month,” she explains. That said, Oludele emphasizes that length of time varies based on how you care for your hair.

    Ms. Hair and Humor agrees: “It isn’t about how long braids can last, it’s about the suggested timeframe a client should keep them installed.” She always suggests six to eight weeks maximum because, in her opinion, “the longer the style is in, the longer clients typically neglect their own hair. It’s important to stay on a strict schedule for a protective style and not only use hair as an anchor.” Regardless of how long you keep your knotless box braids in, be sure to tend to your scalp and handle buildup right away.

    The best knotless box braids ideas

    If you’re looking for the best knotless box braids ideas, Ms. Hair and Humor and Susan Oludele’s Instagrams are great places to start. Because knotless box braids are so versatile, the sky is kind of the limit here, folks. Other star stylists with active feeds full of inspiration include @creativexhands, @nikkinelms, and @vernonfrancois, but if you want a quick overview of some of our favorite looks, just scroll on down below. You truly can’t go wrong with any of these.

    Amber Rambharose is a beauty writer in Philadelphia. Follow her on Instagram @amberdeexterous

    25 Best Teddy Coats to Shop Now: Cozy Coats to Wear All Winter

    Every year when we dig out our fall wardrobes, we’re pleasantly reminded of our love for the best teddy coats. For the past few seasons, it was I.Am.Gia’s Pixie jacket (or a version of it) that dominated the internet—and our closet space. It’s a caramel confection with giant front pockets and an oversized fit roomy enough for layering, but not bulky like an actual winter coat. If you ask us, it’s the Goldilocks of fall jackets: The style is just right with pretty much anything in your fall wardrobe (think sweatpants, leggings, high-rise denim), and the material…well, let’s just say the soft faux fur feels as if you’re being hugged by a luxe teddy bear.

    Much like the Amazon Coat, I.Am.Gia’s beloved style has sold out many times over the years (though it’s currently back in stock and on sale) and retailers at every price point have caught on to the appeal of dressing oneself in a giant sherpa blanket. Brands like Apparis, Mango, and Stand Studio all have their own teddy jacket iterations—so we corralled them into this warm-and-fuzzy gallery to help you find your next furry companion.

    Whether you want an oversized fit, shearling bomber, or teddy coat in a color that’s not exactly subtle (cerulean, anyone?), you’re guaranteed to find something worthy of swaddling yourself in. Shop the 25 best teddy coats—ahem, cocoons—ahead.

    All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

    Dip Powder Nails: The Manicure That Lasts Longer Than Gels

    “Some cheaper dip powders can contain MMD, which is extremely harmful to natural nails and banned in NYC,” says Vanity Projects’ Ariel Zuniga. 

    Dip powder is closely related to acrylic powder, and both require a removal process that is tough on your nails. Dip powder, however, doesn’t use any acrylic nail glue, which can include questionable chemicals. Dip powder also uses thinner layers, which could help reduce your chance of getting an infection or damaging your nail beds. 

    How do dip powder nails work?

    Directions will vary slightly by kit, but the process of applying dip powder nails is generally something like this:

    1. Apply a base coat to your nail.

    2. Dip your wet nail into a jar of powder.

    3. Tap and brush off excess powder from your nail.

    4. Repeat the dipping and brushing until you achieve your desired color and opacity.

    5. Polish with a sealant and your nails will be instantly dry.

    Here, beauty blogger Cristine of Simply Nailogical gives a helpful tutorial on how to do a dip nail manicure at home. 

    Should you try dip powder nails?

    If you’re already fond of more permanent mani solutions, Marton contends that there’s no reason you shouldn’t give dip powder a shot. “They’re equally healthy to gels and basic acrylics that are already out,” she says. Just make sure you’re checking packaging and asking your manicurist what brand she’s using. 

    Another thing to consider is how you like the finish of your nails. Gel manicures look more like traditional nail polish on—meaning they work better for nail art designs—while dip nails tend to look a little thicker on your nail and lend themselves well to solid colors and ombré finishes.

    The best dip powder nail kits

    Want to try DIY’ing a dip manicure at home? Check out a few of our favorite dip nail kits our editors and pros swear by, below.

    Kiss Salon Dip Starter Kit

    This dip powder starter kit is a great value. It comes with a single powder (a neutral peachy pink). You can, of course, buy additional dip nail colors and use them with the included activator and sealant. 

    Red Carpet Manicure Color Dip Starter Kit

    Here’s another basic kit to get you going. Instead of peachy pink, this one comes in the perfect bold red shade. 

    $35

    Red Carpet Manicure

    Azure Beauty Dipping Powder Nail Starter Kit

    This nail kit is filled with gorgeous, moody hues including black, brown, grey, and plum. At the other end of the spectrum, it’s got a shimmering silver and bright white to create French tips. 

    $53$40

    Amazon

    Aikker Dipping Powder Nail Kit

    If you love glitter, this nail kit’s for you. It comes with 12 shimmery dip powder colors and has everything you need to complete a dip powder manicure from start to finish. 

    $70$45

    Amazon

    Revel Nail Fabulous in French Four Color Start Kit

    Create a French manicure that will last and last with this kit from Revel. 

    $49

    Revel Nail

    Revel Nail One Dip Wonders Four Color Starter Kit

    This kit from Revel comes with four shades: a bright red, silver glitter, light pink, and honey beige. 

    $45

    Revel Nail

    How do you remove dip powder nails?

    Just like gels or acrylics, removing a dip powder manicure requires more time and patience than swiping remover on a cotton ball. “There’s no easy way to remove dip powder nails quickly,” says Zuniga. “We recommend using an electric file and soaking off the remaining product with acetone,” i.e., similar to gel nail removal. Of course, the best way to remove them is to go back to your nail tech, otherwise you risk damaging and weakening your nails. If you are planning on removing dip powder nails at home, though, look to our step-by-step dip nail removal guide to ensure the least damage possible.

    And no matter if you remove them at home or at the salon, you should try to give your nails some downtime in between to prevent them from breaking or becoming brittle. Zuniga’s advice? Invest in some good nail after-care products to rehydrate your nails and keep your cuticles moisturized. A few of our favorites include Essie’s Apricot Cuticle Oil and Sally Hansen’s Hard as Nails Strengthener.

    Leah Prinzivalli is a beauty writer in New York City. Follow her on Instagram @leahprinz.

    The Secret to Hoda Kotb’s Happiness? Her Kids, Her Work, and a Magic Root Touch-Up Spray

    And then after usually a few meetings, I try to fit a workout in—whether it’s a run in the park, which I’ve finally mastered with a mask on, or I’ll do a Peloton spin or something—and then it’s time to scoop up Hope and then go by Haley’s school and pick her up. We usually head to the park, have a nice afternoon, come home, and have some dinner. Joel comes home, we put the kids down, Joel and I like to unpack our days, and it’s lights out by 8pm. I’m a big bore. I like sunrises better than sunsets anyway. I try to do a “be here now” thing with my kids—I feel like I’ve spent so much of my life being somewhere but my head is somewhere else. I’m a work in progress, I guess!

    Hoda using the cult-classic Revlon One-Step (we love it, too.) 

    It only takes one “yes”

    When I was looking for a job initially, I got so many rejections. I didn’t stop to question why so many news directors didn’t think I was good enough, but there were lots of them. There were 27 in a row who said “No no no, you’re no good.” I just kept going until someone hired me—that philosophy worked for me. It just reminded me, you only need one person who thinks you’re good enough. Then if one person does, the doors open, and you bust through. I just decided I was going to outwork everyone. I might not be as talented, maybe I’m not as good of a writer as that one or pretty as that one or whatever, but they’re not gonna outwork me. You don’t have to be the smartest or the brightest, you really don’t. You just have to be the one who doesn’t quit. People give up all the time—of course! Because it’s hard! But the funny thing is, you can outlast people. That’s my only secret—just hang in longer. And here we are.

    Learn to have challenging conversations

    “It’s hard to hate up close.” That quote probably resonates the most for me during this time. The more you know about someone—not just their political views, but that they have children, or a sick loved one, you start to learn who they are—it’s hard to hate. My friend said to me, “If you’re in a conversation and it’s difficult, or if you’re trying to get somebody to open up to you, try these three words: ‘Tell me more.’” Not like, “Explain what you’re talking about.” No, not like that, but, “Tell me more.” On the third round of that you’ll be surprised what that person reveals to you. I think it’s easy to be angry and retreat, but I think it takes courage to ask.

    Know yourself (and invest in a good touch-up spray)

    I don’t care about certain things. I’ve worn the same dress I don’t know how many times. I re-wear everything. A lady tweeted me, “I’ve seen that dress 57 times,” and she was right! Our staff even put up pictures of the number of times I wore the dress. I thought it was funny. Like, that’s not my bag! That’s not part of me. There are people who are much cooler than me, who have a much cooler fashion sense than I’ll ever have. It’s not my thing. I’ve had people say to me, “Turn around, you look so much bigger on TV!” I’m a big girl, I don’t care. That doesn’t hit me in my soul.

    Robert Pattinson Is Batman: Everything We Know About His Upcoming Batman Movie

    The Robert Pattinson Batman movie is coming. It’s called The Batman and yes, Pattinson is playing the titular role. He joins an impressive roster of former Batmen, which include Ben Affleck, Christian Bale, George Clooney, Val Kilmer, and Michael Keaton. I already can’t wait to see this. 

    The film was in production when the COVID-19 pandemic shut down pretty much every Hollywood project on the planet. And after they got back to set, the cast and crew faced another delay after Pattinson reportedly contracted coronavirus in September. Now they’re back at it again, complete with masks. 

    Here’s everything we know so far about the Robert Pattinson Batman movie:  

    The cast. Pattinson is taking on the role of the Caped Crusader and will be joined by Zoë Kravitz as Selina Kyle/Catwoman and John Turturro as the villain, Carmine Falcone. Colin Farrell will play The Penguin. In October, photos emerged from the European set as filming resumed. Jeffery Wright, Peter Saarsgard, Paul Dano, and Andy Serkis will also costar in the new adaptation of the DC comic. It’s directed by Matt Reeves, who’s helmed such projects as Dawn of the Planet of the ApesWar for the Planet of the Apes, and Cloverfield. He also coproduced the 2016 Cloverfield spin-off film, 10 Cloverfield Lane

    Getty Images
    Getty Images
    Getty Images
    Getty Images

    The release date. Given the various coronavirus delays, the release date has been pushed to March 4, 2022, according to Deadline. Let the countdown begin. 

    The story. As with most of these big-budget comic book adaptations, the plot has been kept under wraps. But from the first trailer, it looks very dark and extremely creepy…more in the vein of The Dark Knight and The Dark Knight Rises than other Batman films, which we are very here for. 

    This post will be updated as new information becomes available. Stay tuned for more updates. 

    Can We Still Bear Cancer Movies—Like Disney’s Clouds—During a Pandemic?

    “What can you say about a 25-year-old girl who died?” begins Love Story, the classic 1970 Ali MacGraw romance that started an oddly specific and prolific subgenre of movies about young people dying of cancer. 

    The Oscar-nominated movie was followed by A Walk to Remember in 2002, in which Mandy Moore’s character, before she succumbs to the disease, tells her boyfriend, “Without suffering there would be no compassion.”

    In 2014, The Fault In Our Stars gave us even more reasons to cry. In it, Shailene Woodley’s 16-year-old cancer patient character eulogizes her boyfriend, weeping, “You gave me a forever within the numbered days. And I’m grateful.”

    And in the Disney+ Original Movie Clouds, out now, Fin Argus plays Zach, a teenage boy who is diagnosed with cancer. He sings, his voice weary over a buoyant tune, “If only I had a little bit more time! If only I had a little bit more time with you!”

    Fin Argus and Madison Iseman as Zach Sobiech and Amy Adamle in Clouds 

    Courtesy of Disney

    Movies about young people dying from cancer can feel emotionally manipulative—they wring real tragedy for tears and lessons about gratitude and staying present. There’s no denying the catharsis in watching a sleek demonstration that life is precious and short, but it’s a carefully controlled catharsis. When we cry for the protagonists, we cry for the same people time and again—white, young, financially comfortable, beautiful, thin, and straight. We believe we are exercising empathy, but our empathy is extended to an ultra-exclusive group.

    That empathy gap has never been more apparent than now, as America experiences loss of human life on a giant scale from the coronavirus pandemic. It feels almost perverse to sit down for an evening of beautifully lit tragedy when our neighbors are sickening at record rates. And while movies about cancer exercise our emotions, we don’t tend to take those feelings to the point of wondering how the bereaved family is paying for years of treatment, or feel moved to push for safety nets for them.

    But the difference between Clouds and the usual movies that leave your sweater soaked with your own tears is that Clouds is about a real person. Zach Sobiech, a Minnesotan teenager with a terminal cancer diagnosis, not only plaintively sang, “If only I had a little bit more time with you,” he wrote it. In his last year of life—and in the movie it inspired—he had a clear agenda. “I want everyone to know, you don’t have to find out you’re dying to start living,” Zach says in the movie. Those are the real Zach’s words—he said them in a YouTube documentary directed by Jane the Virgin star Justin Baldoni, who also directs Clouds. Based on Fly A Little Higher, the memoir by Zach’s mother Laura Sobiech, the movie succeeds where others in its genre do not because it’s honest about that agenda.

    The real-life Zach Sobiech, singing his hit song “Clouds” 

    Sobiech was diagnosed with osteosarcoma at 14 and was told at the end of his junior year of high school that he had only a year to live. In that year he wrote and recorded the song “Clouds,” which became a viral sensation, rising to become the number one song on iTunes. The original music video has been streamed on YouTube over 14 million times. He died shortly after turning 18, having raised half a million dollars for osteosarcoma research from the proceeds of his song, through the Zach Sobiech Osteosarcoma fund.

    Savannah Guthrie Is Being Praised for How She Handled Donald Trump at NBC’s Town Hall

    Today show co-host Savannah Guthrie moderated a town hall with President Donald Trump on NBC October 15 and is garnering a fair amount of praise for her handling of the situation, which once again saw POTUS avoiding answering questions and going off on rambling tangents. 

    Before the town hall even aired, it was surrounded by controversy. The second presidential debate was supposed to be October 15, but when the president contracted COVID-19 the Presidential Debate Commission decided to change to a virtual format. Trump refused to participate. In the interim, ABC scheduled a town hall with Democratic opponent Joe Biden—who had agreed to the virtual debate format. Trump then scheduled a separate town hall for the same night. A number of major Hollywood players—including the cast of This Is Us, Law & Order: SVU‘s Mariska Hargitay, JJ Abrams, and Ava DuVernay—wrote an open letter to NBC condemning the move. “You are enabling the president’s bad behavior while undercutting the Presidential Debate Commission and doing a disservice to the American public,” they wrote. 

    As for the town hall itself, Guthrie skillfully interjected Trump’s rants with pointed follow-ups. For example, she pushed Trump to once and for all denounce QAnon, the right-wing conspiracy theory group. The president replied, “I don’t know about QAnon. What I do hear about it, they are very strongly against pedophilia.” 

    She further pushed the issue by asking about a false QAnon-related conspiracy theory that claimed Biden tried to have the Navy Seal Team who killed Osama bin Laden taken out as a cover-up because bin Laden wasn’t really dead. “That was a retweet, I’ll put it out there. People can decide for themselves,” he said. She replied, “I don’t get that. You’re the president. You’re not, like, someone’s crazy uncle who can just retweet whatever.”

    At one point Trump referred to Guthrie’s questions as “so cute”—which, ick. “Why aren’t you asking Joe Biden questions about why doesn’t he condemn Antifa?” he said. “Because you’re here,” she replied, and he came back with “So cute” in a sarcastic tone. 

    After the town hall, the Trump campaign released the following statement: “President Trump soundly defeated NBC’s Savannah Guthrie in her role as debate opponent and Joe Biden surrogate. President Trump masterfully handled Guthrie’s attacks and interacted warmly and effectively with the voters in the room.”

    Overall, Savannah Guthrie got positive reviews on Twitter:

    The next and final presidential debate is slated to take place on October 22. 

    Introducing Glamour: 30 Years of Women Who Have Reshaped the World

    For more than 80 years, Glamour has celebrated powerful women. The magazine relaunched in 1943 as a place “for the girl with a job,” and that mission to amplify ambitious, driven women has remained. Nowhere is that more evident than during our annual Women of the Year Awards. 

    Launched in 1990, Women of the Year (or WOTY, as we call it) has become a living history of the evolution of women’s power across film, politics, sports, activism, science and more industries. Each year feminist heroes like Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Michelle Obama, and Malala Yousafzai are honored alongside women working hard to change the world on a more grass-roots level. Their causes and stories are diverse, but they all share one thing in common: They inspire us. 

    We wanted to create a record of all these achievements, as well as a manual for success that women today—and tomorrow—can use as a guide. Which is why we’re proud to announce Glamour: 30 Years of Women Who Have Reshaped the World, a new book with Abrams Books that will publish on March 2, 2021. 

    Inside you’ll find inspiring speeches from the WOTY awards, moving stories about our honorees, and new original content from Diane von Furstenberg, Shonda Rhimes, Samantha Bee, Betty Reid Soskin, and more. 

    And while March 2021 is still far away, you can pre-order Glamour: 30 Years of Women Who Have Reshaped the World now at the retailers, below. We can’t wait for you to read. 

    Glamour’s 2020 Women of the Year Award honorees include Regina King, the Women of Elmhurst Hospital, and more. Read their inspiring stories here.

    Lily Collins Says Her Emily in Paris Character Is This Age—And People Are Confused

    Lily Collins has stirred up yet another Emily in Paris controversy. Seriously, this show has been the subject of so much internet debate since it started streaming on Netflix. From discussions about whether or not it’s actually good and who might hook up in the future to outrage over the treatment of Camille’s character, there’s always something to talk about.

    The latest subject of conversation: Exactly how old is the titular Emily? In a recent interview with British Vogue, Collins—who is 31 in real life—gave her opinion on the matter. “I don’t believe we’ve ever given her a specific ‘number’ for her age, but I believe that she’s pretty fresh out of college,” she said. “Maybe this is her first year after graduation. I want to say she’s like, 22-ish.”

    Collins continued, “She’s had enough experience at her company in Chicago to have earned the respect of her boss. She’s a smart cookie and really innovative—and this is not her first rodeo doing what she does. She’s gone to school for this, and she’s completed internships. However, she’s not the person who travelled during college. She was really, really focused on her jobs in the Midwest, and I don’t think she’s been abroad.”

    Um, what? The premise of this show—a.k.a Emily is tapped to move to Paris for a year after her boss (Kate Walsh) gets pregnant and decides not to go—is already a real stretch for those of us who’ve actually had jobs in the world. But a fresh-out-of-college assistant getting the gig? That makes even less sense. Much about the show is fantastical, which is totally fine! But come on, there’s no way this could be true. She has a master’s degree!

    People on social media have thoughts. “Um ⁦@lilycollins⁩, I’m not sure how to tell you this but a 22-year-old with a master’s degree AND relevant work experience is either a genius who graduated college at 18 or is lying about her age…” one person tweeted. “So she’s 22 with a master’s degree in communications or marketing? No one noticed how many times they changed her master’s degree? I know it’s fiction but doesn’t make sense irl,” another added. A third posted, “Emily has a MASTER’S DEGREE she is not 22!!!! Lily Collins plz.”

    The low-stakes debates over Emily in Paris certainly are a great way to take a short break from the more serious issues of the day, and for that we’re grateful. Thank you, internet. Keep it up.