Read Liam Hemsworth’s Latest Statement on His Split From Miley Cyrus

Liam Hemsworth is reportedly in Australia with his older brother, Chris, riding out the frenzy surrounding news that he and Miley Cyrus are splitting after less than a year of marriage. (The couple first started dating nearly 10 years ago.)

While Cyrus has been actively posting on Instagram, Hemsworth has remained offline. Until now. Yesterday there were reports that he had spoken briefly to a Daily Mail reporter, saying, “You don’t understand what it’s like. I don’t want to talk about it, mate.” But in his latest Instagram post, the actor says he has not talked to any journalists and isn’t planning to any time soon.

“Hi all, Just a quick note to say that Miley and I have recently separated and I wish her nothing but health and happiness going forward,” he wrote, alongside a beautiful photo of a sunset. “This is a private matter and I have not made, nor will I be making, any comments to any journalists or media outlets. Any reported quotes attributed to me are false. Peace and Love.”

Hemsworth’s latest statement comes amid reports in People that Cyrus “really fought to make” their relationship work. A source also tells the magazine, “She wanted to go to therapy. She just wants to be in a healthy and focused place.”

The couple married last December not long after their Malibu home was destroyed by wildfires. “Miley took [the fire] a lot harder than Liam did, and he is the one who helped her get through it and realize everything would be OK,” a source told People. “She even said it all the time herself, that he was her ‘survival partner.’ She took their commitment to marriage seriously and was so excited about being married once she realized it’s what she wanted.”

We’ll keep you posted with any more updates as they come in.

Now You Can Listen to All 131 of the ‘Baby-Sitters Club’ Books on Audio

The Baby-Sitters Club is truly having a moment in 2019. Just last week Netflix announced that the streaming service is turning the classic series of novels into a new series starring Alicia Silverstone as Kristy Thompson’s mom, Elizabeth Thomas-Brewer. And now, starting today, Audible is releasing all 131 titles onto its platform for your nostalgic listening pleasure as the summer winds to a close.

Audible has even secured a big star to narrate the first five novels: Elle Fanning. “The fierce friendships and babysitting adventures of The Baby-Sitters Club have been so much fun to perform,” the actor said in a press release. “It has been such an exciting and new experience for me to bring this entrepreneurial squad to life as Audible books. People can now relive these coming-of-age stories in a whole new way or enjoy them for the very first time.”

A scene from the 1995 film version

©Columbia Pictures/Courtesy Everett Collection

But really, did the books ever go away? We’d argue no. The first book by Ann M. Martin was published in 1986, and since then, more than one generation has learned a thing or two about entrepreneurship, friendship, family problems, and coming of age from Kristy Thomas, Mary Anne Spier, Claudia Kishi, Stacey McGill, Dawn Schafer, and all the other characters who are introduced in the fictional town of Stoneybrook, Connecticut. And then, of course, there was the great 1995 film starring Rachel Leigh Cook and Schuyler Fisk, among others.

“I’m thrilled to see that the readership for The Baby-sitters Club continues to grow after all these years,” Martin said in Audible’s press release. “And I’m grateful and honored to hear from fans—young and old—who have supported the series with such affection, love and nostalgia for all things BSC. I’m excited that Audible will bring the books to life in a new format for the next generation.”

Get your Baby-Sitters Club fix here—and you’ll be prepped and ready when the Netflix show finally premieres.

Katie Sturino Was Told No One Would Buy ‘Chub-Rub’ Products. Joke’s on Them.

Katie Sturino sees you staring. But, to be fair, she gets it. It’s still uncomfortable to have a conversation about chub-rub, let alone see a woman prop her leg up, pop the cap off her anti-chafe stick, and slather it on her inner thighs in the middle of the street without shame. And that’s exactly why she does it. Everywhere—on the sidewalks of New York City, in a European airport, in front of Coco Chanel’s old Parisian apartment—whenever and wherever she needs it.

As the founder of Megababe, a modern personal care brand that caters to traditionally “embarrassing” issues like chafing and boob sweat, Sturino is on a mission to make these concerns as normal as talking about a haircut. “I got the idea for Megababe because after years and years of using a men’s product to stop thigh chafe, I was like, is this the best I can do? A product that’s meant for men’s ball areas?” she says. “There was nothing just for women that wasn’t embarrassing or cheesy, and I thought there needed to be a normal, cool product for us.”

Partly to get the buzz out for her brand’s first product, Thigh Rescue, and partly because, well, she needs to use it anyway, Sturino began filming her now-famous “throwing a leg up” videos for Instagram. “No one knows what I’m doing,” she says, laughing. “Everyone thinks that I’m having a weird, inappropriate moment. I’ve had people unfollow me because they’re like, ‘I don’t want to see that.’ To which I respond, ‘See what? I’m just throwing a leg up.'”

When Sturino first came up with the idea for the brand, she had just as many confused conversations. Friends and family told her a cool, millennial-friendly line aimed at thigh-chafe was too “niche.” Others, mostly men, straight up didn’t believe it was an issue. “So many men have been like, ‘I don’t know what that is. I don’t think women get that,'” she says.

But when she launched Thigh Rescue in the summer of 2017, the numbers spoke for themselves. Within a week, she sold out of her entire inventory. “We made 5,000 units of Thigh Rescue to start with,” she says. “I don’t know if that sounds like a big or a small number to you, but 5,000 of anything is a lot when you’re starting with nothing. So when we sold out in the first week, we were out of stock the rest of the summer. That was awful—but it was also really cool. It confirmed, whoa, this is needed.”

Now You Can Listen to All 131 The Baby-Sitters Club Books on Audio

The Baby-Sitters Club is truly having a moment in 2019. Just last week, Netflix announced that the streaming service is turning the classic series of novels into a new series starring Alicia Silverstone as Kristy Thompson’s mom, Elizabeth Thomas-Brewer. And now, starting today, Audible is releasing all 131 titles onto its platform for your nostalgic listening pleasure as the summer winds to a close.

Audible has even secured a big star to narrate the first five novels: Elle Fanning. “The fierce friendships and babysitting adventures of The Baby-Sitters Club have been so much fun to perform,” the actor said in a press release. “It has been such an exciting and new experience for me to bring this entrepreneurial squad to life as Audible books. People can now relive these coming of age stories in a whole new way or enjoy them for the very first time.”

A scene from the 1995 film version.

©Columbia Pictures/Courtesy Everett Collection

But really, did the books ever go away? We’d argue no. The first book by Ann M. Martin was published in 1986 and since then more than one generation has learned a thing or two about entrepreneurship, friendship, family problems, and coming of age from Kristy Thomas, Mary Anne Spier, Claudia Kishi, Stacey McGill, Dawn Schafer, and all the other characters who are introduced in the fictional town of Stoneybrook, Connecticut. And then, of course, there was the great 1995 film starring Rachel Leigh Cook and Schuyler Fisk, among others.

“I’m thrilled to see that the readership for The Baby-sitters Club continues to grow after all these years,” Martin said in Audible’s press release. “And I’m grateful and honored to hear from fans – young and old – who have supported the series with such affection, love and nostalgia for all things BSC. I’m excited that Audible will bring the books to life in a new format for the next generation.”

Get your Baby-Sitters Club fix here—and you’ll be prepped and ready when the Netflix show finally premieres.

Mama Cax Is Taking the Modeling World By Storm—While Wearing a Prosthetic Leg

For Mama Cax, modeling is an act of self-love. In a world that privileges a narrow standard of beauty and attempts to erase those who don’t fall within it, she opens up a perspective on what the industry could—and should—aspire to look like. On the runway, in front of the camera, and in every frame of her Instagram feed, she embraces herself, her black girl magic, and her disability. “It’s not only looking out for myself, but looking out for my community and making sure that whatever doors I open stay open,” she says.

Cax, who grew up in Haiti and is now based in New York, was diagnosed with bone and lung cancer when she was 14. “The worst part was I didn’t know much about cancer when I was diagnosed,” she recalls. “The stories I heard from friends were scary. It sounded like a death sentence, and my doctors weren’t confident I was going to make it, because this thing was spreading.” Following her treatment, she had a hip replacement, but realized a few weeks later that her body was rejecting it. She was told she had to go into surgery within a matter of hours, where she got a hemipelvectomy amputation on her right leg—a procedure that meant she would require a prosthetic leg and crutches.

At first, becoming confident in her skin wasn’t even a thought she entertained. “I broke down crying,” she says of the moments immediately following her surgery. “I probably spent one or two weeks without looking at my body whatsoever. That sort of disgust lingered and lasted throughout my early years in college. Feeling beautiful or being in a space where I would feel beautiful was not at all on my radar. It wasn’t a priority because I figured I could never get there.”

Growing up, her vision of what it meant to be a beautiful woman entailed curves, long hair, and lighter skin, an image she viewed in opposition to herself. “Obviously, I didn’t fit any of that,” she says. “I still don’t fit any of that.” Her earliest memory of feeling pretty remains clear in her mind—getting her ears pierced at eight years old, a rite she thought of as a marker of femininity.

There is no longer any mold Cax tries to inhabit other than the definition she makes for herself. Rather than attempting to make others comfortable by shopping for prosthetic legs that match her skin tone, she revels in her collection of vibrant covers by Alleles, often matching them to her outfit. But that shift required her to first re-examine her relationship to her appearance and how disability would fit into her identity. At first, fashion was a way for her to hide everything she had no desire to see. “I fell in love with fashion because I realized I looked pretty when I covered everything up,” she says.

Then two things happened. A decision to travel through Southeast Asia made her realize that blogs failed to account for much of the population. “They didn’t tell me if I’d be safe as a woman, if I would face racism, and if it was accessible,” she says. She decided to provide that information and in doing so, began to speak about her disability with confidence. “I think that was the very moment where I was like, ‘I’m a woman with a disability, I need certain accommodation—how can I get there, survive there for six months, and use my knowledge to let other people know they can do it as well.'”

Cashmere Nicole Is What a CEO in 2019 Looks Like

Despite catering primarily to women, the beauty industry has typically been run by older white men. After 86 years in business, Revlon just hired its first-ever female CEO in 2018. The CEOs of Estée Lauder, Coty, and LVMH, which control a large majority of the beauty industry are still all men. According to LedBetter’s Database, only 24% of executive seats at personal care companies are held by women, and women only hold 5% of CEO titles at S&P 500 companies, little to none of which are women of color.

But there’s a new wave of female entrepreneurs shaking this up. Brands like Pat McGrath Labs, Glossier, Huda Beauty, and Anastasia Beverly Hills are valued in the billions, and Beauty Bakerie is showing no signs of stopping. The magic of these brands lies in the fact that they aren’t run by traditional businessmen, instead by women who closely understand their target markets and are social media savvy enough to foster a true community and cult following.

Making an impression online has become a crucial part of Beauty Bakerie’s business. In August 2018, the brand went viral again for its Cake Mix Foundation launch, which comes in 58 shades, and was the first in the industry to label its shades from darkest to lightest, a move that was followed by Glossier.

Foundation shopping was never easy for Nicole, even as a lighter-skinned black woman, and she saw how it was nearly impossible for her darker-skinned relatives and daughter. Nicole says she internalized that and began to notice that it not only hurt to have to hunt for shades, but that it was physical work. Endless scrolling, bending down to the very bottom of a display, approaching sales people only to be told a shade was an online exclusive, just for a single bottle of foundation.

“I thought to myself, I’m going to create a situation, where women of color don’t have to feel that way anymore,” she tells Glamour, noting the decision was simple. “It would have a major positive outcome for African-Americans, and it wouldn’t have a negative outcome on white Americans. No one light- or fair-skinned was going to feel slighted.” Nicole doesn’t want credit when it comes to creating this new metric, since it’s about more than her—she’s just happy to see it’s catching on. “We did this to create change, and the change is taking place. That makes me smile,” she says.

Employers Have Policed Black Hair for Decades. These Women Have Had Enough.

“As a black woman who’s worn my hair natural since 1995, I’ve understood how important hair and hair texture is for women, especially the issues we’ve had surrounding our hair,” says Eggleston Bracey. That’s also why she felt a corporate responsibility to expand on [Unilever brand] Dove’s commitment to real beauty and diversity. “I was looking out around the room, and I was looking at how diverse the legislative officials were; how many of our black legislative officials had textured hair. And it occurred to me, ‘Wow, with this critical mass, we can change this.'” Her plea to those legislators? Find a resolution to hair discrimination.

Eggleston Bracey’s speech cut right to Mitchell’s core. “It’s personal for me from many perspectives,” the senator tells Glamour. Growing up, she wore braids with decorative beads through high school—a style that helped solidify her sense of self. She now wears locs. “Fast forward several years, to having my son in high school. He wore twists to school on the first day of his junior year, then came home that evening and made the decision to take them out, because he wasn’t comfortable with bullies,” she says, adding, “I graduated from high school in 1982 in Riverside [California], which wasn’t a bastion of progressive politics. At no point was my wearing braids to school every day an issue. I thought, How did we go backward?”

Mitchell flagged down Eggleston Bracey as soon as she got off the podium.

“I followed her out of the breakfast, grabbed her staff member, gave them my card, and said, ‘Here I am, a state senator in California, the fifth-largest economy in the world. A progressive, important state legislature, and I’m loc’d. I think it would make sense that I carry the bill,'” Mitchell recalls. It’s a crucial example of just how vital representation in our boardrooms and our legislation truly is—in few other scenarios could two people with the power to make change not only empathize but honestly understand why the need for protection against hair discrimination is so imperative.

From there, the two went to work, recruiting the help of a handful of activist organizations to co-found the CROWN (Creating a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair) Coalition. While Mitchell began drafting language for the bill, Eggleston Bracey led Dove’s CROWN Research Study, in which the brand surveyed 2,000 women ages 25 to 64 who worked in office settings to uncover just how societal norms and corporate grooming policies unfairly impact Black women in the workplace. The results, depending on your own awareness, were either shocking…or not.

“What the study showed is how pronounced and prevalent the issue around hair is,” says Eggleston Bracey. “Eighty percent of women reported that they’ve changed their hair from its natural stage to fit in a corporate environment. That’s four out of five black women in the study. I knew it would be an issue, but to see how broad-scale and pervasive it was [was surprising].” Another stat that was widely reported from the survey? Black women were 50 percent more likely to have reported having been sent home or know of a black woman sent home from the workplace because of her hair.

The stats and Mitchell’s powerful introduction of the bill spoke for themselves. In July, the California state assembly unanimously passed The CROWN Act. Five days later, the governor signed it into law, making California the first state to legally enforce that locs, twists, and braids are just as school- or business-appropriate as any other hairstyle. New York state followed 12 days later with its own anti-discrimination bill.

Some have made the argument that there are more pressing issues to set legislation around than hair, a complaint both Malalis and Mitchell have heard repeatedly. “When we first came out with our guidance, there were some folks who said, ‘Hair? Who is going to care about hair?'” says Malalis. “But there were other folks who said, ‘I cannot believe you actually have to say this. I can’t believe people don’t know this is racist.’ The reality is that so many people have been experiencing this because schools and employers have never really cross-examined their own policies or what’s behind them. Is this really about health and safety? No, it’s not. Because even the U.S. Army who exacts the highest degrees of health and safety amongst its ranks has also said this is not okay. So if it’s not about health and safety, what [are these rules] really based on?”

Glamour Women of the Year All Year: Beauty

This year has made one thing clear: women are showing up, stepping up, and taking what they deserve. From politics to pop culture, women aren’t just leveling the playing field, they’re owning it. As we ramp up to our annual Women of the Year summit, we will be highlighting women across industries who do the work every day. Whether it’s the CEO of a multinational retail corporation, a James Beard Award-winning chef, or the World Cup champions, here are the women you need to know right now. We’ve celebrated the women in sports, up now: 12 women who are making their mark in the world of beauty, where entrepreneurs, artists, influencers, and legislators are fighting to make the beauty industry—and our culture at large—a more inclusive, truly beautiful place.


Anne Marie Nelson-Bogle Climbed the Ladder at L’Oréal. Now She’s Calling the Shots.

Despite a new guard of women-led start-ups challenging the beauty industry, the corporate world of Big Business Beauty remains a fairly male-dominated environment. But there are glimmers of hope proving women can get ahead at the giants built on our spending power, and no one exemplifies that more Anne Marie Nelson-Bogle.

For over 16 years, Nelson-Bogle has climbed corporate ladder at L’Oréal, working on various brands under the company’s umbrella. She began as a group manager for L’Oréal Paris Skin Care’s Canadian market in 2004, making stops along the way in the marketing departments for La Roche-Posay, Maybelline New York, and L’Oréal Paris Cosmetics. Now, as the Deputy General Manager for L’Oréal’s entire U.S. portfolio, she’s the decision-maker behind all the major campaigns and spokeswomen you see on TV. She knows what women want when it comes to beauty, and she’s pushing back against the industry’s status-quo.

“Women are defined by so much more than just their age or backgrounds, and we want this to come across in everything we do,” Nelson-Bogle tells Glamour. The core of every L’Oréal Paris campaign is the brand’s slogan “Because you’re worth it,” which the exec says has gone beyond a tagline to become a promise to empower women. It’s a mission that’s incredibly personal to Nelson-Bogle, and to her, that means showcasing women of all walks of life, particularly when it comes to aging and skin tone. “I know when you recognize and realize your worth, it’s a powerful thing,” she says. “I hope to help instill this sense of worth in others.”

One of the ways she leads the charge in this is through L’Oréal Paris’ Women of Worth philanthropy, which awards one winner $25,000 to her own charitable initiatives each year. Over the past 13 years, more than 130 women have been honored. Nelson-Bogle says it’s one of the most rewarding parts of her job. “One honoree who stands out is Jaha Dukureh, who was recognized as a Woman of Worth in 2015,” she says. “Jaha was recognized for her cause, Safe Hands for Girls, which does life-saving work to protect young girls against female genital mutilation in Gambia, Africa. I’m incredibly humbled and proud of my role in a company that uses our global platform to elevate their inspiring stories and missions.”

Of course, philanthropy is only part of her role—another big part is casting the spokeswomen who represent the brand and what it stands for. In an industry where youth is not only the ideal but the standard, it’s still considered a risk to show a women over 40 as aspirational. But it’s a risk Nelson-Bogle is happy to take.

The Golden Age of Influencers Might Be Ending, But Jackie Aina Is Just Getting Started

If that’s not proof enough of clout she’s earned herself, there’s this: at a recent editor-only event for Pat McGrath, one of the industry’s most influential makeup artists, Aina was the sole influencer to appear, looking right at home as she caught up with McGrath one-on-one.

There are few individuals that brands both deeply adore and are afraid to be called out by—a review from Aina carries enough weight to make or break a launch, and she says she often consults with brands for free. It’s a task she’s more than willing to undertake, knowing that there’s often a disconnect between what companies discuss at the table and what consumers of color need. “These things that happen probably could’ve been avoided if you had somebody from that community at the table actually saying, ‘This isn’t a good idea.’”

Not only is Aina calling on brands to do better, she also weaves necessary discussions of cultural appropriation and representation into her videos. Her viral “colorblind” makeup tutorial is evidence that viewers watch—and appreciate—content that directly addresses these issues. Aina recalls how early on in her career, a subscriber approached her and told her she had previously hesitated to wear red lipstick because she was too dark. Through her channel, Aina showed her she could feel beautiful. “It’s always the ‘thank you for teaching me that dark skin isn’t punishment and isn’t ugly’ moments that tell me I’m doing something worthy,” she says.

There’s been plenty of chatter about 2019 being the end of influencers, but Aina isn’t worried one bit. She thinks people are turning to accounts that make them feel seen now more than ever. “You can go online and find someone who looks like you, thinks the same way you do, had the same struggle, but got out of that,” she says. “There are so many great things about that. People really want to know you holistically; especially what else you stand for.”

For Aina, the message has always been clear—and it’s always been bigger than her. “What is this going to do for my community?” says Aina. “If I don’t say anything, will it harm my community?” With that in mind, she keeps speaking up.

Bella Cacciatore is the beauty associate at Glamour. Follow her on Instagram @bellacacciatore_.


This year has made one thing clear: Women are showing up, stepping up, and taking what they deserve. From politics to pop culture, women aren’t just leveling the playing field—they’re owning it. As we ramp up to our annual Women of the Year summit, we will be highlighting women across industries who do the work every day. Whether it’s the CEO of a multinational retail corporation, a James Beard Award–winning chef, or the World Cup champions, here are the women you need to know right now. We’ve celebrated the women in sports, up now: 12 women who are making their mark in the world of beauty, where entrepreneurs, artists, influencers, and legislators are fighting to make the beauty industry—and our culture at large—a more inclusive, truly beautiful place.