The Women of the WNBA Just Scored a Historic Victory In the Fight for Equal Pay

This summer was huge for the fight for equal pay—thanks largely to the very high-profile crusade of the US Women’s Soccer Team leading up to and following their World Cup victory. But the battle for equal pay and playing conditions isn’t just happening in soccer. It’s sweeping the world of sports—and the women of the WNBA just won big.

For over a year, the players have been fighting for fair pay and play—bigger paychecks and better benefits—and today, thanks to a new eight-year collective bargaining agreement, they’re about to see it starting with the 2020 season. “The 2020 CBA features significant investments by the league and its teams aimed directly at increasing player salary and compensation, improvements to the overall player experience, resources specifically designed with the professional female athlete in mind, as well as a commitment to implement an integrated marketing plan league-wide,” the league said in a press release.

First, there’s the straight-up salary situation. There will be 53% increase in total cash compensation, which is made up of base salary, performance bonuses, prize pools for new in-season competitions, and league and team marketing deals. Under the new agreements, the top players will be able to earn over $500,000, which is triple the number of the previous deal. Other players will have the chance to earn between $200,000 and $300,000.

This is historic. As the release notes, the women of the WNBA will average a six-figure salary for the first time in league history.

But this isn’t just about the money, though that is obviously important. The CBA also guarantees a better player experience when it comes to travel, guaranteeing an individual hotel room for each player and an upgraded class of plane travel. It’s an issue that’s plagued women across sports as male athletes get the first class treatment and female athletes are on the ultra-budget plan. (Can you imagine asking Steph Curry or LeBron James to bunk up with someone on the road or cram into a coach seat on the way to a game? No, you cannot and these elite athletes should not be forced to do so either.)

The WNBA will also institute new maternity and child care policies. For example, players will receive their full salaries while on maternity leave, a new annual childcare stipend of $5,000, safe and private spaces for nursing mothers, and an up to $60,000 reimbursement for veteran players to offset the costs of adoption, surrogacy, egg freezing or fertility/infertility treatment. Players will also have access to enhanced mental health benefits, education and counseling related to domestic/intimate partner violence, and career development support that could include off-season job opportunities with league partners.

These changes still don’t amount to equality, but they’re a huge an important step—one that could be a model for female athletes across sports. In negotiations between the players and the WNBA, “we found common ground in areas that confirmed the league’s and the players’ intentions to not only make meaningful improvements in working conditions and overall professional experience, but also to improve the business with strategic planning and intentional marketing that will keep the WNBA front and center year-round,” said Nneka Ogwumike, president of the WNBA Players’ Association.

Let this be a sign for more progress for all women in the workplace in 2020.

The Women of the WNBA Just Scored an Historic Victory in the Fight for Equal Pay

This summer was huge for the fight for equal pay—thanks largely to the very high-profile crusade of the U.S. Women’s Soccer Team leading up to and following their World Cup victory. But the battle for equal pay and playing conditions isn’t happening only in soccer. It’s sweeping the world of sports—and the women of the WNBA just won big.

For over a year, the players have been fighting for fair pay and play—bigger paychecks and better benefits—and today, thanks to a new eight-year collective bargaining agreement (CBA), they’re about to see it starting with the 2020 season. “The 2020 CBA features significant investments by the league and its teams aimed directly at increasing player salary and compensation, improvements to the overall player experience, resources specifically designed with the professional female athlete in mind, as well as a commitment to implement an integrated marketing plan league-wide,” the league said in a press release.

First, there’s the straight-up salary situation. There will be 53% increase in total cash compensation, which is made up of base salary, performance bonuses, prize pools for new in-season competitions, and league and team marketing deals. Under the new agreements, the top players will be able to earn over $500,000, which is triple the previous deal. Other players will have the chance to earn between $200,000 and $300,000.

This is historic. As the release notes, the women of the WNBA will average a six-figure salary for the first time in league history.

But this isn’t just about the money, though that is obviously important. The CBA also guarantees a better player experience when it comes to travel, guaranteeing an individual hotel room for each player and an upgraded class of plane travel. It’s an issue that has plagued women across sports as male athletes get the first-class treatment and female athletes are on the ultra-budget plan. (Can you imagine asking Steph Curry or LeBron James to bunk up with someone on the road or cram into a coach seat on the way to a game? No, you cannot, and these elite athletes should not be forced to do so either.)

The WNBA will also institute new maternity and child care policies. For example, players will receive their full salaries while on maternity leave, a new annual child care stipend of $5,000, safe and private spaces for nursing mothers, and an up to $60,000 reimbursement for veteran players to offset the costs of adoption, surrogacy, egg freezing, or infertility treatment. Players will also have access to enhanced mental health benefits, education and counseling related to domestic/intimate partner violence, and career development support that could include off-season job opportunities with league partners.

These changes still don’t amount to equality, but they’re a huge an important step—one that could be a model for female athletes across sports. In negotiations between the players and the WNBA, “we found common ground in areas that confirmed the league’s and the players’ intentions to not only make meaningful improvements in working conditions and overall professional experience, but also to improve the business with strategic planning and intentional marketing that will keep the WNBA front and center year-round,” said Nneka Ogwumike, president of the WNBA Players’ Association.

Let this be a sign for more progress for all women in the workplace in 2020.

11 Best Yoga Pants in 2020, According to Yoga Instructors

Finding the best yoga pants is as satisfying as falling asleep in Shavasana. Because whether you spend your mornings performing four or five Sun Salutations, or just need a pair to lounge in while watching the new season of You, the perfect yoga pant is a notoriously elusive closet essential.

You need leggings that won’t roll down your waist, aren’t too sheer, and don’t squeeze you like a stress ball. Plus, the technology involved in modern-day yoga pants is a far cry from the simple cotton ones of decades past—now there are moisture-wicking materials to keep the sweat at bay in a heated room and stretch fibers to keep your waistband from folding as you move through poses. Add in a million options for styles, cuts, and patterns and things can start feeling very un-zen.

So we went to the experts—real women who teach yoga—to find out what they actually wear when practicing…or running errands. From tried-and-true Lululemon leggings to new favorites from Carbon38 and some seriously comfy borrowed-from-the-boys sweats, check out their recommendations for the best yoga pants, below.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Best Haircuts for 2020: 19 Popular Haircut Ideas to Try

Whether you’re scoping out the best haircuts for 2020 or curious to see the most popular haircuts on the rise, you’ve come to the right place. Because while we love the classic lob as much as the next person, we need a little variety—and what better way to get inspired than with the coolest hairstyles from around the U.S.?

Starring curly shags in Detroit, textured bobs in Austin, and curtain bangs in New York City, we asked stylists to share the most requested styles at their salons to bring you the best haircuts from every corner of the country. Scroll on for all the inspiration you need.

Alison Pill: ‘I Thought Mom Brain Would Be the End of Me—It Became My Super Power.’

It started with crosswords. Or rather, the lack of them. Or rather, the lack of me doing them. My brain was a little muddled, and names were not coming to me as easily as they once had, so suddenly crosswords weren’t as fun. Also books. And scary movies. And talking to people. I blamed the baby who’d suddenly taken up residence in my body.

I had complicated feelings about becoming a mom. As a feminist, I wondered how this new person would affect my work and how my work would affect this new person. How would I make sure I still had interesting things to talk about and not turn into a mom person who only wanted to chat about her kid? How would I keep my identity clear to myself, my husband, and this human?

I was between acting jobs when I got pregnant, and therefore was forced to a very luxuriously long (and very frustratingly unpaid) maternity leave. (Shockingly, no one was looking to hire a pregnant actress for non-pregnant parts.) It was the longest break I’d taken from working since I was 12. And surprisingly? I was into it. I was obsessed with the creature inside me, and what kind of curtains that person might enjoy as I decorated our nursery. I’ve never cared about curtains so much in my life.

Alison Pill in The Newsroom. 

Courtesy of HBO

Then I hit my third trimester and discovered that one of the great tragedies in the life of a pregnant lady is being unable to sleep. The little monster inside of me had taken my body’s stillness at night as an invitation to perform their own dances and yoga routines. It was wonderful…and annoying.

As a result of only sleeping from 3 a.m. to 7:30 a.m. most days (feeling thankful for every precious minute) and dealing with wave after wave of hormone changes, my brain was feeling…different. Less rested, more volatile. As the months passed, I gave up on crosswords past Thursday. I gave up on books that weren’t hilariously addictive crime fiction (Carl Hiassen in particular gave me joy in those very uncomfortable months). I gave up on movies that couldn’t guarantee a happy ending. And conversations about anything other than puppies and rainbows.

I hadn’t even given birth yet and already I had “mom brain”—I couldn’t have the same conversations or read the same books. I felt less and less recognizable to myself.

Eventually, the creature keeping me up all night from inside my body began keeping me up all night while outside of my body. It was a thrilling change becoming a mom, but did nothing for my sleep habits or my emotional consistency. I was a human puddle of hormones, thrilled when I got to have a shower, let alone a conversation with my husband that didn’t revolve around feeding schedules. I started to feel lonely, as so many new moms do—understandable given the person you spend the most time with sees you as a pair of nipples and a warm body. That person doesn’t share your love of Russian literature, or your interest in great plays. That person wants milk, sleep, cuddles, and to figure out how to make their eyes work. Fascinating and inspiring and beautiful though they are, infants are terrible conversationalists.

Deep into the disorienting haze of mom brain, I came upon a study outlining how pregnancy literally reduces the gray matter of your brain. The gist is that through “synaptic pruning,” a pregnant woman’s brain goes through a change similar to adolescence in its restructuring—some aspects of your cognition become weaker while others become sharper in an effort to better tailor your brain to the challenges of motherhood.

The idea that my brain was redefining what it could and would do was terrifying. I’d spent nine months surrendering so many things I thought were essential to my being—my body, my job, my irresponsibility. No one mentioned I’d also be giving up my brain as I knew it. But reading the study made me feel like someone had reached out to say, “It’s okay. Your brain is normal. You’ll be alright.” My lizard brain desire to protect my kid and lack of patience for social interactions that felt inauthentic suddenly made sense. Evolution is cool like that.

Motherhood did change my identity, right down to my gray matter, but not in the scary ways I’d feared. I used to have hours in a day to learn lines, to dream up character ideas, to wallow in self-indulgent actor stuff. Now I only have nap time to do all that but I find my brain can shift into different modes so much more swiftly. Mom brain isn’t such a bad thing.

Alison Pill and Wilder. 

Joshua Leonard

More than anything, I’ve learned it’s impossible to get it right as parents, and yet, we do it anyway. Accepting the less-than-perfect scenario is my new cognitive superpower, and momhood lets me practice it every single day.

My kid is three now and my mom brain has continued evolving—mostly thanks to the fact that I now cohabitate with a little Question Machine. I try to limit myself to one “just because” answer per day, which means I have to do a lot of research. It’s exciting and humbling to realize just how little you know when grilled by a three-year-old.

My mom brain has become a time management expert, a more humble and patient servant, and a curious challenger—and I’ve never been more grateful for the work it does. Even if it means I don’t do crosswords all that often anymore. After all, I’ve got to use my mom brain to explain optical physics (AKA rainbows) to my three-year-old.

Alison Pill is mom to Wilder and also an actor. She can be seen in Star Trek: Picard and in the upcoming DEVS and Them.

Is Andrew Yang 2020’s Unlikeliest Feminist Truth Teller?

The sixth Democratic debate held in December 2019 wasn’t quite filled with surprises, but it did have a few good zingers—one of which was delivered to us by none other than Andrew Yang, the sole person of color in attendance and perhaps the unlikeliest candidate on stage. (He just missed the cut-off for tonight’s debate in Iowa.)

“If you get too many men alone and leave us alone for a while, we kind of become morons,” Yang said.

For much of the 2020 race, Yang was a virtual unknown in a crowded field; he’s never held an elected position and the position he talks about with the most passion isn’t health care or student debt, but Universal Basic Income—which, he would maintain, could help deal with problems like health care and student debt.

Yang believes that advancements in AI will eliminate entire swaths of the American workforce. To cope with the destabilization, he wants to put a little cash in people’s pockets each month—no strings attached. Yang is an optimist about human nature and a realist about the issues we all face. Hence, the “men can be morons” quip.

Sure, the line shouldn’t be that impressive. But in the context of a presidential debate, the admission that groups of men left alone in rooms can and do wreak havoc on the world (and the women) around them felt momentous.

A few weeks later, I called Yang to talk about it as he was driving around rural South Carolina and I was heading from Palm Springs to Los Angeles. We chatted about feminism, tech, child care, reproductive health care, and, as Yang put it, a lot of “bullshit, frankly.”

Molly Jong-Fast: How did you get here? How did your views on sexism evolve?

Andrew Yang: I’ve been working in the startup world for a number of years. And it doesn’t take anyone that savvy to figure out pretty quickly that the startup world is highly male-dominated and chauvinistic. I saw dozens of aspiring female entrepreneurs who would interact with potential advisors or investors who were men and the men were more interested in hitting on them than helping them.

You see that and you think, Wow. Any thought that the startup ecosystem is somehow a meritocracy of ideas and [the process is fair] is completely farcical.

My husband is a [venture capitalist] so we talk about this a lot—women in tech and how women in tech are treated.

I’m sure he sees a lot of the same. Bullshit, frankly. I mean, just the level of bullshit that women have to put up with is staggering. So that was one input.

Another was seeing so many incredibly talented women that I went to school with end up running into all these headwinds when they were in various corporate environments. The companies seemed to alienate women in ways big and small. I saw so many women friends eventually just say, “Is this worth it? I have to armor myself up when I go into the workplace every day.”

On top of that, many of them also have families and all of their responsibilities were just multiplied 10 times over, 20 times over, a 100 times over. I saw it with my wife’s experience even when she was pregnant and had our boys.

Is that how you realized that paid leave was such a big problem?

You have to ask yourself, “How the heck is the United States nearly alone on a global list of countries that doesn’t recognize something as basic as a need for moms to take time off when they have kids?” It’s because we’re pathologically anti-woman, anti-family, and we treat everyone like their [only value is] their economic output.

This Is Reportedly Why Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Decided to Step Down as Senior Royals

Things have been moving very quickly across the pond since Meghan Markle and Prince Harry shocked the world with their decision to step down as senior royals.

There has been much speculation about who knew what and when, what their futures will look like as they work to become “financially independent,” and, of course, why this is happening at all. In a new People story, a friend of the couple says, “If relationships had been better, things would have been different.”

“This is not how they wanted to handle this, but Meghan and Harry’s hand was forced,” the friend continued. “There is so much bad blood in that family—it’s toxic.” (The person did not call out any specific members of the royal family by name.) Another source told People that the negative press left Markle, in particular, “deeply, deeply hurt.”

“Meghan and Harry didn’t feel they got enough comfort or solace from them,” the source also said.

Whatever is actually going on inside the family is hard for anyone to guess. But we do know Prince Charles, Prince William, and Prince Harry joined the queen at Sandringham yesterday for a summit to discuss solutions and possible plans for the Sussex’s future. Ahead of the meeting, the brothers released a joint statement condemning a story that stated William had “bullied” Prince Harry and Markle out of the family. “Despite clear denials, a false story ran in a U.K. newspaper today speculating about the relationship between The Duke of Sussex & The Duke of Cambridge. For brothers who care so deeply about the issues surrounding mental health, the use of inflammatory language in this way is offensive and potentially harmful,” the statement read.

Queen Elizabeth also emphasized family in her statement yesterday after the meeting. “My family and I are entirely supportive of Harry and Meghan’s desire to create a new life as a young family. Although we would have preferred them to remain full-time working Members of the Royal Family, we respect and understand their wish to live a more independent life as a family while remaining a valued part of my family,” she said.

It’s expected that decisions surrounding what Meghan Markle and Prince Harry’s future will look like will be made quickly, per the queen’s request. As for the complicated family stuff, that may take longer.

People Can’t Stop Talking About Netflix’s New Show, The Circle

We’re only a couple weeks into 2020, and there’s already one show that has everyone on the internet buzzing: Netflix‘s The Circle. It was really just a matter of time before the streaming giant got into the reality TV game—and here we are.

In The Circle, which is hosted by Michelle Buteau, contestants all move in to a single building, but each one is sequestered in their own apartment and they don’t physically interact with each other. Instead, they communicate via a specially-designed social media app where they create profiles that are then rated by the others. This means they can create any persona they want to—and think will resonate with the others. The two with the highest ratings become “influencers” while the rest are at risk of being “blocked” by said influencers. But there are often twists and turns thrown in along the way. The winner takes home $100,000.

The Netflix press site describes the show this way: “In The Circle you never know who you’re playing against as contestants bond, flirt, and plot, all in an effort to earn clout exclusively through a unique social media platform. Everyone’s competing to gain influence and avoid getting voted out. But who’s for real and who’s a catfish? With $100K on the line, what would you do—and who would you be—to win?”

People online can’t stop talking about The Circle, even if they feel a little bit guilty for watching it. “Anybody else start watching The Circle on Netflix as a joke and wind up getting sucked in??” one person tweeted. Another wrote, “The Circle sounds like my dream reality show. I’m in complete isolation in a nice apartment, no one is allowed to contact me except through social media and I get to scream at my TV all day?? Sign me up ASAP.”

See more reactions for yourself, below.

The Circle is currently streaming on Netflix.

11 Best Pillows for Side Sleepers, According to Diehard Reviews

Have you ever spent time thinking about what the best pillows for side sleepers are? Turns out the quest for a comfortable night’s sleep is quite popular in certain corners of the internet. It makes sense—we all have very specific things that help us fall asleep at night, whether it’s lavender spray, tips from a week of sleep bootcamp, or finding the perfect pillow.

Side sleeping is generally considered the healthiest position, according to Terry Cralle, RN and certified clinical sleep educator, but that doesn’t stop many of us who prefer it from waking up with all kinds of neck, back, and ear pain. That’s because, unlike stomach and back sleepers, side sleepers need extra support to keep their head and neck in a neutral position. Michael Breus, Ph.D., a Los Angeles clinical psychologist and sleep specialist, recommends a thick, firm pillow that “will fill the space between your outer shoulder to your ear, allowing your nose to be in line with the middle of your chest,” he says.

Breus also recommends replacing your bed pillows every 18 months. “If you’re using [a] pillow that’s five or six years old, you’re not getting the support you need—and you’re not sleeping as comfortably as you could,” he says. Not sure whether yours needs to be swapped out? Check for sweat stains, tears, and weird smells—all signs that your pillow (and pillowcase) has reached its final days.

Short of buying and testing rounds of pillows yourself, a useful place to start is with the people who’ve put in the hours on the top-rated pillows for side sleepers. We combed through thousands of reviews and found some strong opinions—from those who swear their decades of neck pain was gone in one night to people who claim they were lulled to bed in mere seconds. Here are the 11 best pillows for side sleepers, according to diehard reviews.

Some reviews have been edited and condensed for clarity.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

11 Best Pillows for Side Sleepers, According to Die-Hard Reviews

Have you ever spent time thinking about what the best pillows for side sleepers are? Turns out the quest for a comfortable night’s sleep is quite popular in certain corners of the internet. It makes sense—we all have very specific things that help us fall asleep at night, whether it’s lavender spray, tips from a week of sleep bootcamp, or finding the perfect pillow.

Side sleeping is generally considered the healthiest position, according to Terry Cralle, RN and certified clinical sleep educator, but that doesn’t stop many of us who prefer it from waking up with all kinds of neck, back, and ear pain. That’s because, unlike stomach and back sleepers, side sleepers need extra support to keep their head and neck in a neutral position. Michael Breus, Ph.D., a Los Angeles clinical psychologist and sleep specialist, recommends a thick, firm pillow that “will fill the space between your outer shoulder to your ear, allowing your nose to be in line with the middle of your chest,” he says.

Breus also recommends replacing your bed pillows every 18 months. “If you’re using [a] pillow that’s five or six years old, you’re not getting the support you need—and you’re not sleeping as comfortably as you could,” he says. Not sure whether yours needs to be swapped out? Check for sweat stains, tears, and weird smells—all signs that your pillow (and pillowcase) has reached its final days.

Short of buying and testing rounds of pillows yourself, a useful place to start is with the people who’ve put in the hours on the top-rated pillows for side sleepers. We combed through thousands of reviews and found some strong opinions—from those who swear their decades of neck pain was gone in one night to people who claim they were lulled to bed in mere seconds. Here are the 11 best pillows for side sleepers, according to diehard reviews.

Some reviews have been edited and condensed for clarity.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.