The Women of RAICES Have an Important Message: ‘Stand Up. Fight Back’

The truth isn’t so easy. I had a choice of going either to school or surviving. I had to help my madrecita put food on the table and raise my brother. But the system doesn’t reward those priorities. Instead, the system made me and my family suffer. It’s deporting my friends, it’s killing families, it’s putting children in cages, and keeping thousands of people in danger across the border. It’s this system that these women on stage are fighting every day.

My mom, sitting right there, the love of my life, that beautiful woman, is a woman who knows how to play both mama and papa. She’s a woman who gave up her dreams, left everything behind in Peru, like so many mothers may be doing at this moment. The story I continue to write is her story, and tonight, I want to give her some hope in writing a new chapter in her life.”

She then called her mother up to the stage and presented her with a gift: an envelope containing her green card. “You’ve been waiting for this for the past 17 years,” she said, “and I’m happy to let you know that you are finally getting it.”

The women then led the audience in a chant: “When immigrant rights are under attack, what do you do? Stand up. Fight back!”

A leader in providing legal services to immigrants in federal detention centers and in the community, RAICES is a resource for asylum-seeking families in a system designed for them to fail. With over 10 million undocumented individuals in the U.S., RAICES helps unaccompanied children, single adults, families, and the LGBTQ community feel welcomed, safe, and protected in their new cities.

With the enactment of the Trump administration’s zero-tolerance policy, RAICES’ work is more vital than ever. And after raising $20 million through a Facebook fundraiser amid nationwide uproar over family separations—it’s clear that they’re not slowing down. The majority of RAICES’ employees are female, and women hold most of the leadership positions, so Glamour was honored to welcome the change-makers at the annual awards ceremony.

Find out more about Glamour’s 2019 Women of the Year here.

Jane Fonda Says Greta Thunberg Inspired Her to Step Up Her Climate Activism

In the year since 16-year-old Greta Thunberg started striking to demand action on climate change, the movement has grown fast. Young people all over the world have started walking out of school once a week to call on the grownups to do something in an action called #FridaysforFuture. And when activists talk, Jane Fonda listens.

Fonda has been an outspoken advocate for most of her life, protesting war, violence, discrimination, and now our collective inaction when it comes to saving the planet. And last month, Fonda launched her Fire Drill Fridays campaign, promising to protest in Thunberg’s spirit each Friday through the end of 2019. (It’s led to her getting arrested at the U.S. Capitol on a regular basis.)

At Glamour‘s Women of the Year Awards on November 11, Fonda continued to honor Thunberg’s example. She accepted Thunberg’s WOTY Award on the teen’s behalf as Thunberg continues to travel the United States to draw attention to the issue of climate change. With her at New York’s Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center for the occasion were activists Xiye Bastida, 17, Alexandria Villaseñor, 14, and Jade Lozada, 17. “When I saw Greta Thunberg strike for climate, I knew I had to mobilize my school and our city. Greta’s views match my own, that you take care of the Earth, and the Earth takes care of you,” Bastida said ahead of Fonda’s remarks.

Fonda delivered a passionate speech, reminding the audience of the power of activism. “I have not met Greta Thunberg, but Greta Thunberg changed my life,” Fonda said.

Fonda asked the crowd to become “warriors for the climate” on Thunberg’s behalf and take greater, bolder risks to save our planet. Read Fonda’s entire call-to-action on behalf of Greta Thunberg, below.

“I have not met Greta Thunberg, but Greta Thunberg has changed my life. I’d been feeling anxious and depressed, because I knew I wasn’t doing enough in the face of the catastrophe that is looming.

I drive an electric car. I’m stopping the use of single-use plastic in my home. I eat a lot less meat or fish. Yes, and fish, because fish stocks are plummeting because the ocean is becoming acidified and the climate is warming. These things are wonderful, they’re all very important, and we should all do them. But it’s a good place to start—it’s not a good place to stop. Because individual life choices like these can’t be scaled up in time to get us where we need to be.

But what do I do? I thought, I wondered, I asked myself in the comfort of my Beverly Hills home. And then I read about Greta.

I read that she’s on the spectrum. She has Asperger syndrome, and that means that unlike the rest of us, you see, people with Asperger see and learn things that are not clouded by the rationalizations and obfuscations of the rest of us. They don’t worry about being popular or fitting in. What they see, they see, pure and direct. And I knew that what Greta had seen was the truth.

When she realized what was happening and looked around and saw that no one was behaving like it was a crisis, it so traumatized her that she stopped speaking. When I read this, I decided that I needed to do something more than what I’d been doing.

Greta said, today we use 100 million barrels of oil every day. There are no politics to change that. There are no rules to keep the oil in the ground. And so we can’t save the world by playing by the rules, right? Right? Right? Greta knows that.

Tory Burch Has a Message For Women Everywhere: ‘Embrace Your Ambition’

“It’s amazing isn’t it, how difficult it can be for a woman or a girl to simply be ambitious,” The Walking Dead and Black Panther star Danai Gurira said as she presented designer Tory Burch with her 2019 Glamour Women of the Year award on Monday, November 11. “To have her eye on the prize without apology. How many times do we diminish ourselves, our voices, our abilities, even our opportunities, to stay comfortably within the status quo? To not ruffle any feathers or draw attention unto ourselves? How much greatness has been lost through this pervasive type of oppression?”

She continued, “Tory is unapologetic with her brand. The bold way she adorns women with class, flair, and fun all at once, and with the way she is working to leave no woman or girl behind. To popularize feminine ambition. From the millions of dollars she invests in female entrepreneurs to her awareness campaigns, arming people with education on the grotesque gender gap that still exists in so many ways. Tory is a champion for change, using the fruits of her ambition to nurture and empower the ambition of others.”

And when Burch took the stage, she had a poignant message on how to accept being told “no” in business. (Spoiler: don’t.) After all, anyone who manages to transform a small creative concept—her debut collection was based out of a Manhattan kitchen—into over 250 boutiques worldwide knows a thing or two about ambition. In addition to that, her charitable organization, The Tory Burch Foundation, was built to empower aspiring female entrepreneurs. The designer has clearly gone above and beyond in terms of achieving her dreams—and others’.

“When I was first launching the company, I presented my business plan to a group of men, they were the investors. I told them I was going to build a business that focused on purpose. They very concretely said to never mention the words ‘business’ and ‘social responsibility’ in the same sentence,” Burch said in her speech. “Of course, that only furthered my resolve. What they called ‘charity work,’ I called a business plan.”

She continued, “It was then that I realized that women are criticized for being ambitious, for exhibiting the exact same traits that men are praised for. And that is simply unacceptable. The reason we launched our Embrace Ambition initiative is to create a new paradigm, to change the conversation and to spark real and meaningful change around this topic. I’ve learned a few things since we started. First, women and men need to do this together. Men need to be part of the conversation. Second, women are the best investments. One stat I looked up this evening, is that if women entrepreneurs participated equally in the economy, the GDP would go up by $5 trillion. That is good for business, that is good for our economy and that’s common sense. And third, we must combat the unconscious bias at the root of all inequity. And we believe that starts with embracing ambition. I believe that starts with embracing ambition. Whether that means being a stay-at-home mom, a business executive or an activist, whatever ambition means to you.”

She concluded her speech with a moving quote. “I’m a big fan of quotes. Shakespeare once said, ‘The very substance of the ambitious is merely the shadow of a dream.’ My dream—my ambition—is to move the needle, to help create the equality our world so desperately needs right now. To all the women that are here tonight, all of you that have a dream, I want you to remember that the world will say no to you in so many different ways. Your job is to keep saying yes to yourself. And know that you have women, you have me supporting you all along the way. Because I feel like we’re just beginning, and the conversation is so important, so thank you so much for this honor.”

Find out more about Glamour’s 2019 Women of the Year here.

Read Every Word of Chanel Miller’s Powerful Poem at the ‘Glamour’ Women of the Year Awards

In September 2019, 27-year-old Chanel Miller told the world that she was Emily Doe, the young woman who was sexually assaulted by Stanford University student Brock Turner. Her case rocked the nation in 2016 and started necessary conversations about assault on college campuses. Shortly after Miller came forward, she released her memoir, Know My Name, sharing even more of her story. Miller has become a beacon of hope for sexual assault survivors everywhere, and—after being honored in 2016 as Emily Doe—she was recognized in person at Glamour‘s annual Women of the Year Awards.

“There’s a leader here tonight who changed the way our society sees assaults against women on college campuses,” Glamour editor in chief Samantha Barry said before Miller joined her on stage. “She told the story of her rape at Stanford with a courtroom impact statement that vibrated around the globe. She also shared her story anonymously in the pages of Glamour. Back then she was known as Emily Doe, and she became a real-life hero to assault survivors and justice seekers everywhere.”

Barry continued, “We honored Emily as a Glamour Woman of the Year in 2016, but she couldn’t collect her award herself. To protect her privacy she had a representative accept on her behalf, reading a note she had written, reminding us that our stories are our power. What we didn’t know then was that Emily was actually in the room that night, sitting silently in the back, listening to every word. In September this year, she finally felt safe enough to bravely and publicly share her identity. Now everyone knows her name: Chanel Miller.”

Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Glamour

In lieu of a speech, Miller recited a poem she had written called “I Don’t Give A Damn.” Read it, below:

I don’t give a damn / What you were wearing / I don’t give a damn how much you drank / I don’t give a damn / If you danced with him earlier in the evening / If you texted him first / Or were the one to go back to his place. / People may continue to come up with reasons “why it happened” / But the truth is, I don’t give a damn.

But I do / give a damn / How you’re doing / I give a damn about you being okay / I give a damn if you’re being blamed for the hurt you were handed / If you’re being made to believe you’re deserving of pain.

The only reason I am standing here / Is because people gave a damn about my well-being / Even when I did not. / They reminded me that I carry light / and I deserve to be loved / Even when I forgot.

They gave a damn. / That’s why I am who I am today.

So here’s the takeaway. / When we step up for survivors / when we stop sealing them off in shame / When we quit interrogating them with stupid questions

Look what happens.

Books are written, laws are changed, / We remember we were born to create / To not only survive, but look hot and celebrate.

Tonight you must come away knowing / That I will always, always give a damn about you / The way you gave a damn about me.

Find out more about Glamour‘s 2019 Women of the Year here.

Read Every Word of Chanel Miller’s Powerful Poem at Glamour’s Women of the Year Awards

In September 2019, 27-year-old Chanel Miller told the world that she was Emily Doe, the young woman who was sexually assaulted by Stanford University student Brock Turner. Her case rocked the nation in 2016 and started necessary conversations about assault on college campuses. Shortly after Miller came forward, she released her memoir, Know My Name, sharing even more of her story. Miller has become a beacon of hope for sexual assault survivors everywhere, and—after being honored in 2016 as Emily Doe—she was recognized tonight at Glamour‘s annual Women of the Year Awards.

“There’s a leader here tonight who changed the way our society sees assaults against women on college campuses,” Glamour‘s editor-in-chief Samantha Barry said before Miller joined her on stage. “She told the story of her rape at Stanford with a courtroom impact statement that vibrated around the globe. She also shared her story anonymously in the pages of Glamour. Back then she was known as Emily Doe, and she became a real-life hero to assault survivors and justice-seekers everywhere.”

Barry continued, “We honored Emily as a Glamour Woman of the Year in 2016, but she couldn’t collect her award herself. To protect her privacy she had a representative accept on her behalf, reading a note she had written, reminding us that our stories are our power. What we didn’t know then was that Emily was actually in the room that night, sitting silently in the back, listening to every word. In September this year, she finally felt safe enough to bravely and publicly share her identity. Now everyone knows her name: Chanel Miller.”

In lieu of a speech, Miller recited a poem she had written called I Don’t Give A Damn. Read it, below:

I don’t give a damn / What you were wearing / I don’t give a damn how much you drank / I don’t give a damn / If you danced with him earlier in the evening / If you texted him first / Or were the one to go back to his place. / People may continue to come up with reasons “why it happened” / But the truth is, I don’t give a damn.

But I do / give a damn / How you’re doing / I give a damn about you being okay / I give a damn if you’re being blamed for the hurt you were handed / If you’re being made to believe you’re deserving of pain

The only reason I am standing here / Is because people gave a damn about my well being / Even when I did not / They reminded me that I carry light / and I deserve to be loved / Even when I forgot

They gave a damn / That’s why I am who I am today

So here’s the takeaway / When we step up for survivors / when we stop sealing them off in shame / *When we quit interrogating them with stupid questions *

Look what happens

Books are written, laws are changed / We remember we were born to create / To not only survive, but look hot and celebrate

Tonight you must come away knowing / That I will always, always give a damn about you / The way you gave a damn about me.

Find out more about Glamour‘s 2019 Women of the Year here.

Megan Rapinoe: ‘Lending Your Platform to Others Is Cool’

So while I’m enjoying all of this unprecedented—and, frankly, a little bit uncomfortable—attention and personal success, in large part due to my activism off the field, Colin Kaepernick is still effectively banned from the NFL, for kneeling during the national anthem in protest of known and systematic police brutality against people of color, known and systematic racial injustice, and known and systematic white supremacy. I see no clearer example of that system being alive and well than me standing before you right now. It would be a slap in the face to Colin, and to so many other faces not to acknowledge, and for me personally, to work relentlessly to dismantle that system that benefits some over the detriment of others, and frankly is quite literally tearing us apart in this country.

While we all have injustices we are facing—for me personally, a very public fight with our [US Soccer] Federation over why we don’t deserve to be paid equally; some people even say we do our job better. I don’t know! It’s crazy!—I still know in my heart of hearts and my bones that I can do more. And that we can do more. And I know that because we just have to. We must. It’s imperative that we. do more.

My mom, who’s here today, looking stunning, by the way—shout-out to mom—impressed upon me and my twin sister at a very young age, ‘You ain’t shit cause your good at sports. You ain’t shit cause you’re popular. You’re gonna be a good person. You’re gonna be kind. And you’re gonna do the right thing. You’re gonna stand up for yourself, always. You’re gonna stand up for each other, always. And you’re damn sure ‘gonna stand up for other people. Always.

She taught us that in kindness and in caring and in giving a shit and sharing—that’s abundance. That’s the kind of culture we want to live in. I feel like we live in this scarcity type culture; one of my best friends always says that. That’s not the world I wanna live in. I think we can move on from losing alone to the belief in winning together.

With that abundance in mind, I want to re-imagine what it means to be successful, what it means to have influence, what it means to have power, and what that all looks like.

I’ve gained this incredible platform in such a short period of time, but I’m not gonna stand on it alone. I refuse to do that. There’s gonna be ladders on every side, all over the place. And I’m not gonna act like it wasn’t Colin Kaepernick, Tarana Burke and the #MeToo Movement, Patrisse Cullors, Alicia Garza, and Opal Tometi of Black Lives Matter, the women of Time’s Up, Harvey Milk, Gloria Steinem Audre ‪Lorde, Travon Martin, Sandra Bland, and the injustices that so many others face that have put me in this very position. And I’m not gonna act like my whiteness has nothing to do with me standing before you now. I don’t want to live in that kind of world. I don’t think that kind of world is the world that suits everybody and is gonna move us forward in the direction that we need to go.

We’ve gotta switch the game up.

Caring is cool.

Lending your platform to others is cool.

Sharing your knowledge and your success and your influence and you power, is cool.

Giving all the fucks is cool. Doing more is cool.

I don’t need to say that to all the other women who are being honored tonight. Everyone is doing that. But to everyone else in this room, we have such an incredible opportunity to redefine what power and influence and success looks like. From the looks of it, this looks like a room full of powerful and influential and successful people. So share that platform. Throw your ladders down. It’s our time. We’re ready for this. And it needs to happen. This is such a pivotal movement for us. There’s so much momentum, but we have to move forward and we have to be better. So everybody: We have to do more. We’re here. We’re ready. Everyone’s ready to do more? Good!

Thank you so much for this amazing award. Thank you, everyone.

Find out more about Glamour‘s 2019 Women of the Year here.

Let Margaret Atwood’s Women of the Year Speech Inspire You to Keep Rising Up

Margaret Atwood‘s work needs no introduction. She’s the prolific writer of the eerily prescient The Handmaid’s Tale and its sequel, the newly released The Testaments, as well as 60 other literary triumphs. Still, at the 2019 Glamour Women of the Year Awards, she admitted to the audience that she’s still experiencing some firsts: “This is my very first pair of false eyelashes,” she said.

In her acceptance speech, Atwood spoke about what questions she’s asked most often, what gives her hope, and why the kids are alright.

“I’m often asked what words of encouragement I might have for young women especially at this moment, with so many countries trying to roll back women’s rights, with many female politics subjected to vicious attacks, and with uncertainty everywhere,” she said. “What’s encouraging to me is seeing how women come together—in journalism, to research and expose abuses, in business to invent their own companies, in politics to defend and to extend democracy, and in health and welfare to help other women around the world.”

Atwood highlighted the work of fellow 2019 Women of the Year Greta Thunberg as an example of how the next generation inspires her. “You hardly need my words of encouragement, young women, because you are creating your own words and encouraging one another,” she said. “Because of you, we oldies have hope for the real world. So go for it.”

Atwood went on to talk about what it means to her to receive the award later in life. “It’s encouraging for someone over 70 to still be considered ‘glamorous,'” she said. “When I was 20 and just beginning to publish, I believed life ended at 40.” To present our 2019 Lifetime Achievement winner—and hero to women everywhere—with her award, we called upon one of the women who knows her best: Samira Wiley, star of Hulu’s adaptation of Handmaid’s.

Wiley shared her first memory of Atwood with the audience. “I first met the literary goddess Margaret Atwood at a dinner in Toronto before we started shooting The Handmaid’s Tale. I was super nervous. Her characters are so iconic, and here I was about to bring one to life. I’m thinking, ‘Oh God, will she approve of me?’ Then Margaret walks in, and it’s like a wave of reverence washes over the restaurant,” she said. “She’s pretty much Canadian royalty, with this energy that draws you to her. She quickly pegged me and Lizzy Moss as the cool kids—rightfully so—treating us like that hip aunt with so much wisdom…who also gives you a bit of a hard time. I’m proud to report that by the end of that magical night, I had wrangled both her seal of approval and the confidence I needed.”

She also went on to describe the impact of Atwood’s work. “What’s so powerful and awe-inspiring about Margaret’s work—not just The Handmaid’s Tale and her brand new sequel The Testaments but her entire body of brilliant, subversive, multi-genre writing—is that she creates art that elicits real change in our society. She makes you look. She makes you terrified, particularly about reproductive rights. And then she makes you brave. Along with millions of fans around the globe, she has expanded my idea of the impact that I can make in this world. And I am certain that we all dream bigger because of Margaret Atwood.”

Find out more about Glamour‘s 2019 Women of the Year here.

Busy Philipps’ Best Quotes at Glamour’s Women of the Year Awards

Actor Busy Philipps lives up to her name and has been, well, busy. In addition to releasing her memoir This Will Only Hurt a Little, launching a late-night talk show in 2018, and becoming one of Aerie’s new role models earlier this year, Glamour tapped her to host the 2019 Women of the Year Awards, which took place on November 11 at Alice Tully Hall in New York City.

If you follow Philipps on Instagram, you know she’s a natural at making you feel like she’s your best friend. She brought the same warm, inspirational, and hilarious energy to Glamour‘s Women of the Year events. First, at the Women of the Year Summit, she had a heartfelt conversation with her friend and Ban.do founder, Jen Gotch. “I’ve long believed in internet friendships becoming real-life friendships,” Philipps said. “I do think one of the wonderful things about social media is it can help you reach out to people: commenting on people’s photos, finding like-minded people through friends of friends.”

Busy Philipps exuded her signature energy hosting the Glamour Women of the Year Awards. Introducing this year’s honorees, including Charlize Theron, Yara Shahidi, and Megan Rapinoe, Philipps encouraged the crowd to embrace discomfort and continue pushing for the changes they want to see in the world, all with her winning sense of humor.

See her best quotes from the night, below.

“Make some noise if you’re an empowered lady! Make some noise if you love to empower ladies! Now make some noise if you’re so tired of making noise in order to fight for gender equality but that’s how things are so we’re just going to keep making noise!”

“Charlize Theron is here! Hi. Actress. Activist extraordinaire, Oscar-winner, and radical risk-taker. I’ve been in spin class with her—she can ride a bike. This year she’s shining a spotlight on sexual harassment by appearing in the upcoming film Bombshell as Megyn Kelly. I mean obviously, your movie about Roger Ailes had to be called Bombshell since you already made a movie called Monster.”

“Because of women like you, I stand here in front of you tonight with more hope than I’ve ever had in my life. Because we are no longer observers in the great work of other great women. We are the great women doing the great work to make change.”

“Change sucks! It’s uncomfortable, for some! But you know who’s really fucking used to being uncomfortable? Women. I mean PHYSICALLY, personally, I’ve been uncomfortable since I was 11. Do you even REMEMBER how bad nipple buds hurt? … And then cramps and the mood swings and the bleeding that ruins all your underwear cause period trackers didn’t exist and most of them sell your information to the government anyway. Do you know the discomfort boys have to deal with in puberty? It’s wet dreams. They literally get to cum in their sleep. Look, I bet 90% of you are uncomfortable right now, I’m a little bit uncomfortable, because just today you got extra-strength mascara in your eye or had hot wax ripped from your labia or you’re currently wearing a bra or shoes that feel like medieval torture devices! But we know the discomfort of being the only woman in the room. Or of being condescended to. Of walking to our car or the train at night. Are we as women afraid of a little discomfort? Fuck no. And since discomfort is where change happens, trust me, women will change this world.”

Busy Philipps’s Best Quotes at Glamour’s Women of the Year Awards

Actor Busy Philipps lives up to her name and has been, well, busy. In addition to her releasing a memoir This Will Only Hurt a Little, launching a late-night talk show in 2018, and becoming one of Aerie’s new role models earlier this year, Glamour tapped her to host the 2019 Women of the Year Awards, which took place on November 11 at Alice Tully Hall in New York City.

If you follow Philipps on Instagram, you know she’s a natural at making you feel like she’s your best friend. She brought the same warm, inspirational, and hilarious energy to Glamour’s Women of the Year events. First, at the Women of the Year Summit, she had a heartfelt conversation with her friend, Ban.do founder Jen Gotch. “I’ve long believed in internet friendships becoming real-life friendships,” Philipps said. “I do think one of the wonderful things about social media is it can help you reach out to people: commenting on people’s photos, finding like-minded people through friends of friends.”

Busy Philipps exuded her signature energy hosting the Glamour Women of the Year Awards. Introducing this year’s honorees, including Charlize Theron, Yara Shahidi, and Megan Rapinoe, Philipps encouraged the crowd to embrace discomfort and continue pushing for the changes they want to see in the world, all with her winning sense of humor.

Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for Glamour

See her best quotes from the night, below.

“Make some noise if you’re an empowered lady! Make some noise if you love to empower ladies! Now make some noise if you’re so tired of making noise in order to fight for gender equality—but that’s how things are, so we’re just going to keep making noise!”

“Charlize Theron is here! Hi. Actress. Activist extraordinaire, Oscar-winner, and radical risk-taker. I’ve been in Spin class with her—she can ride a bike. This year she’s shining a spotlight on sexual harassment by appearing in the upcoming film Bombshell as Megyn Kelly. I mean obviously, your movie about Roger Ailes had to be called Bombshell since you already made a movie called Monster.””

“Because of women like you, I stand here in front of you tonight with more hope than I’ve ever had in my life. Because we are no longer observers in the great work of other great women. We are the great women doing the great work to make change.”

Glamour Women of the Year Awards 2019: The Best Moments

The accomplishments of Glamour‘s Women of the Year Awards honorees are vast, but their stories all share one thing in common: These women aren’t waiting for the world to become a better place—they’re making it one. They span a wide range of ages, backgrounds, and professions—an author, a director, an athlete, a designer, actors, and activists fighting to make a lasting difference. They’re all warriors on the front lines of change.

Hosted by Busy Philipps at Alice Tully Hall in New York City’s Lincoln Center on November 11, Glamour‘s 2019 Women of the Year Awards is set to be one of our greatest yet. All year we’ve watched women go higher, think bigger, and demand more. A record number of women won Congressional elections last fall. More women are starting businesses than ever before. We continue to share our #MeToo stories and our demands for safety in the workplace and in our relationships. We insist on equal opportunity and equal pay, especially for women of color.

Tonight, we celebrate these messages of hope, strength, and resiliency—and the women using their platforms to spread them. Read on, below, as we recap every unforgettable moment from the 2019 Glamour Women of the Year Awards.

Opening Remarks From Busy Philipps

Busy Philipps—the best-selling author, actor, activist, and your favorite follow on Instagram—was the host of Glamour‘s 2019 Women of the Year Awards. She kicked things off by marveling at the many accomplishments the Women of the Year honorees have had this year, before sharing a big moment of her own. “A year ago I launched a late-night talk show called Busy Tonight,” she said. “Yes, I interviewed celebrities and talked about pop culture news, but I also wanted to use the opportunity to subversively talk to my audience about things like sexual harassment, systemic racism, and internalized misogyny—you know, but in a fun way. I also talked about my period a lot. Then, in the face of terrifying reproductive rights legislation last spring, I shared my own abortion story on air. I encouraged other women to join me on social media using the hashtag #youknowme, which resulted in empowering millions of women to not only join the fight for a women’s right to choose but also to rid themselves of a stigma we don’t need to hold onto any longer. I even testified before Congress.”

She continued, “I don’t share this story to pat myself on the back—although, Jesus, that’s allowed, ladies! Do we have to get [Megan] Rapinoe out here for a symposium on confidence? I share this story to say I’m not fearless. I was scared at times. I don’t think there’s a person in this room who is fearless. I just think we realized that in order for change to happen, we have to be willing to be a part of it. And at this point, I just hope that our hope for how things could be and our anger at how things have been is so much greater than any fear that could ever hold us back.”


Everyone at Glamour would like to extend a very special thank you to our sponsors. Without them, Women of the Year would not be possible.

Special thanks to our presenting sponsors: L’Oréal Paris | Mercedes-Benz

Supporting sponsors: Aerie | JNSQ | Verizon

And philanthropic partner: Children of Fallen Patriots

Special thanks to: America SCORES New York | Rent the Runway | The Wall Group

Special thanks to our gift bag contributors: Aerie | ASHA by Ashley McCormick | Aritzia | Botkier | Carolina Lemke | Casa Dragones | Clare V. | Emily & Meritt Glamsquad | L’Oréal Paris | Rothy’s | Small Packages | Terez | Tory Burch | The Little Market