Glow Recipe Banana Soufflé Moisture Cream Review

To top it off, a few more anti-inflammatory ingredients were mixed in. Cofounder and co-CEO, Christine Chang, points to centella asiatica and turmeric, which she loves for taking down redness and irritation. (She also notes that the addition of chia helps lock in water, provide essential fatty acids, and maintain your moisture barrier.) Vitamins A, B, and C finish off the ingredients list, working together to maximize hydration and counteract dullness.

All of this gets whipped into a pale yellow cream that comes in one of the brand’s cute glass jars. If you love bakery-style banana pudding as much as I do, you will be overjoyed when you unscrew the lid and smell dessert. (And if you don’t, fret not; like all of Glow Recipe’s other offerings, the scent dissipates as soon as you apply it.) The moisturizer has a texture that’s much less dense than you might expect from a winter-grade product. It’s more bouncy gel-cream than buttery lotion, which means it spreads into the thinnest of layers and sinks in instantly; you won’t feel like you’re wearing a banana-infused mask and can easily pat it on under makeup.

Miraculously, it achieves the same level of evaporation-free hydration it usually takes me several serums, a leave-on face mask, two layers of salve, and a face oil to accomplish. I treat it as a final layer morning and night, ditching the heavy ointments in favor of this lightweight barrier. As soon as I layer it over my glow-boosting serums and essences of choice, it smooths out dry patches, takes my dehydrated midface region from parched to plump, and keeps it that way until I wake up in the morning (or remove my makeup at night). Truly, this is how the universe intended bananas to be used. Winter, go ahead and do your worst.

Sarah Wu

Glow Recipe Banana Soufflé Moisture Cream, $39, 12/4 on the Sephora App, 12/5 on sephora.com.

Glow Recipe Banana Soufflé Moisture Cream

Sephora

$39

Buy Now

Sarah Wu is a writer in Berlin. Follow her on Instagram @say.wu.

Best Fragrances for Women in 2019: Top Fragrances by Zodiac Sign

If you’re the type of person who pays attention to what the stars have in store for you, there’s a fair chance you’ll allow the zodiac to have at least a little reign over your life—even if it’s something as simple as the jewelry you wear or finding a splashy holiday gift for your closest Leo.

Whether you’re of the water, air, fire, or earth family, the twelve sun signs have characteristics that surface in a number of ways, and can guide you towards who you date, what you watch, which sex positions to try next, and—hear us out—which signature scent to call your own. Dreamy Pisces? Look for light, natural scents. Luxurious Taurus? Go for rich, earthy oils. Hardworking Virgo? Unwind with cedarwood.

Ahead, astrologer Vanessa Montgomery of Astro All-Starz shares the fragrance notes that vibe with your sign—which we conveniently paired with the best perfumes for 2019.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Best Fragrances for Women in 2019: Top Scents by Zodiac Sign

If you’re the type of person who pays attention to what the stars have in store for you, there’s a fair chance you’ll allow the zodiac to have at least a little reign over your life—even if it’s something as simple as the jewelry you wear or finding a splashy holiday gift for your closest Leo.

Whether you’re of the water, air, fire, or earth family, the twelve sun signs have characteristics that surface in a number of ways, and can guide you towards who you date, what you watch, which sex positions to try next, and—hear us out—which signature fragrance to call your own. Dreamy Pisces? Look for light, natural scents. Luxurious Taurus? Go for rich, earthy oils. Hardworking Virgo? Unwind with cedarwood.

Ahead, astrologer Vanessa Montgomery of Astro All-Starz shares the fragrance notes that vibe with your sign—which we conveniently paired with the best fragrances for women in 2019.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

5 Tips for Turning Your Big Idea Into Even Bigger Small Business

She Makes Money Moves is a new podcast from Glamour and iHeartRadio. Hosted by Glamour editor in chief Samantha Barry, the podcast shares intimate, unscripted stories from women across the country along with advice from financial experts to help guide those women—and women everywhere—forward. Download a new episode every Tuesday, then visit glamour.com/money for an article like this, with more insights from that week’s expert.


The number of women-owned businesses in the United States has grown by almost 3,000% since 1972, according to the 2018 State of Women-Owned Businesses Report. Women now make up 40% of entrepreneurs—and more are becoming their own boss than ever before.

This week’s podcast guest did just that. She left her job to hike the Pacific Crest Trail, and when she finished that, she eventually opened a business inspired by the trek. While she loves her work, she’s having trouble making enough money to stay in business. To make do, she’s picked up side jobs, but would like to come up with a more rigorous business plan. So Barry welcomed Ashley Feinstein Gerstley, founder of the Fiscal Femme to the podcast. Here Feinstein Gerstley outlines how to turn your big idea into an even bigger business.

Know your numbers.

When we’re going out on our own and starting our own businesses, it’s more important than ever to know our numbers. That means knowing exactly what our personal and business expenses cost us each month and each year. When planning, try to include things that happen less regularly like annual subscriptions, doctor’s appointments, travel needs, etc. Using a budgeting spreadsheet helps to make the process simple.

Map out your future income.

When I left my corporate job to run the Fiscal Femme full-time, the business was nowhere near profitable. I was earning some income from the Fiscal Femme, so I did my best to map out/project how that could potentially grow over time. This was important so I knew how much “runway” or how many months of expenses I needed to have saved to be able to stay afloat if the business continued to lose money.

This is a lot more of an art than a science but aim to map out how you expect your revenue to look over time. This number will continually change so update your numbers as your business grows and changes—and budget accordingly.

Create your version of a “freedom fund.”

When I decided I wanted to work on the Fiscal Femme full-time, I created a spreadsheet called the “Project Freedom.” Here I tracked all of my income and expenses, and most importantly, it was a place where I tracked my total savings. Every time I saved money, I added it to the total on the spreadsheet. I never felt more motivated to decrease my expenses as when I was building up my freedom fund.

How a Grey’s Anatomy Episode Led to an Increase in Sexual Assault Awareness

We may be living in the age of too much content (because really, who can get to it all?!?), but a new study shows that one single episode of popular television can still make a big impact on the world. Grey’s Anatomy has been in our lives since it premiered on ABC in 2005, and over the past 15 seasons fans have seen many powerful and emotional episodes. But one, in particular, from last March is proving to have a lasting effect on awareness around sexual assault.

“Silent All These Years” first aired on March 28, 2019 and featured a storyline with a patient named Abby, who Dr. Jo Karev and Dr. Teddy Altman learn has been sexually assaulted. At the time, I wrote about how sensitively the show handled the issue of consent on many levels, but particularly how the doctors treated Abby as they examined her. The episode culminated in an emotional moment where female doctors, nurses, and other hospital staff line the hallway as Abby was taken into surgery because every male face she sees reminds her of her attacker.

At the end of the show, Ellen Pompeo did a PSA for viewers about reaching out for help if they had been affected by sexual violence, and gave information about contacting the National Sexual Assault Hotline operated by the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network, or RAINN (800-856-HOPE or via online chat hotline.rainn.org/online/). And now a new study is showing the real-life impact of the show.

Researchers at the Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences studied search trends on Google and Twitter for two weeks before and one week after the episode aired. They monitored terms like “Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network,” “RAINN,” “sexual assault,” “rape,” “sexual assault hotline,” and tweets mentioning @RAINN. They also collected data from RAINN on call volumes in the 48 hours after the episode aired.

“Engagements with the @RAINN Twitter account and tweets mentioning ‘sexual assault hotline’ increased by 1,097% the day after the episode,” researcher Trevor Torgerson told Reuters Health. They also found the National Sexual Assault Hotline call volume increased by 43% in the 48 hours after the episode, and the volume of searches for the term “RAINN” was 41% larger than expected, and search volumes for “rape” and “sexual assault” were 8% and 9% higher, respectively. In addition, the number of tweets mentioning “sexual assault hotline” and “RAINN” were 1,995% and 292% higher than usual.

“An adored actress, such as Ellen Pompeo, may be able to convince someone to seek help in a way that ‘only’ flashing the hotline number may not be able to. That being said, if flashing the hotline number is all that can be done, we would agree there is a benefit to it,” Torgerson said.

Whatever the factors, it’s incredible to see the impact that one episode of television (in this case, Grey’s Anatomy) can have on the world.

Want to Know What Consent Looks Like? Start Reading Romance Novels

When we’re writing these scenes, the author has control over every aspect: when, where, and what the characters are thinking and feeling. So we have the power to create something sexy, wonderful and totally consensual. All we have to do is pause, look at what we write, and make sure all the characters have real agency.

But it’s not just sex! A lot of what has been coded “hero behavior” in our brains isn’t cool anymore. Stuff like exerting control or the heroine, or following her home “for her safety” and “because he cares.” As authors we have a choice about what portray is heroic behavior, so we should use our power for good.

What do you wish that people who still think of romance novels as “bodice rippers” knew about what sex is actually like in romance novels today?

Rodale: I wish people knew that in romance we’re not ashamed. We’re really damn proud of it and we don’t feel guilty about it. And you notice these characters never feel guilty for enjoying themselves. Not to mention, that in a lot of [older] literature, the heroine dies after they have sex. There is some sort of punishment for a woman daring to enjoy herself. But with romance novels it’s like, “No. She’s going to have a great time and live happily ever after.”

Gallop: I would love romance novels to actually set the agenda for depictions of fulfilling and consensual sex in a way that no other area in popular culture is doing. Not least because every other era of popular culture is massively male dominated. There’s a misconception out there that consenting sex means stopping every two minutes going, “Is this okay? Is it okay if I do this? Is it okay if I do this?” And of course that’s not it. I would just love to see many more people actively turn to romance novels to understand what really drives fantastic, great, fulfilling consensual sex.

Romance novels have come along way, but what do you believe still needs to be done to push the genre forward?

Rodale: I might be alone in this, but I think there’s a space for the characters to not have perfect sex the first time. People want sex to be perfect on the first time, but in reality it doesn’t always happen like that. I love [when writers] explore the process of two people learning each other. I think that’s sexy and romantic. Then I think we need more overall inclusivity and favorable depictions of nontraditional relationships. Romance is still very one man, one woman, who are probably going to get married. That works for a lot of people and that’s great. But I think that can also be kind of limiting. So I think it’d be interesting to read those stories and explore other definitions of happy ever after for people.

Samantha Leach is the associate culture editor at Glamour. Follow her on Twitter and Instagram @_sleach.

The Ripped Bodice Is the Only Romance Bookstore in the Country. For the Sisters Who Opened It, It’s a Love Story

The Ripped Bodice, which counts Stacey Abrams as a fan, officially opened in the Culver City neighborhood of Los Angeles in 2016. With books hanging from the ceiling, walls of antique bureaus that look like they’re ripped from a 19th century heroine’s boudoir, and a one-eyed Chihuahua roaming the aisles (their bookstore dog, Fitzwilliam Waffles)—it’s every inch the fantasy. But its impact on the community has been real, and meaningful. The shop has become a staple for prominent romance novelists on tour, as well as a bucket list destination for readers who for far too long felt marginalized within the greater literary world. And in response to their visitors’ frequent requests for more diverse stories—”Customers would walk in the door saying, “I want books with an Asian heroine. Do you have any books about people with disabilities, or with Muslim characters?” says Koch—they now publish an annual diversity report advocating for more nuanced stories in the genre.

Then in 2018, in true meet-cute fashion, a mystery woman walked into shop and offered them an opportunity to reach an even wider audience. The Ripped Bodice is only a few blocks away from the Sony Pictures lot. So when Executive Vice President of Drama Development Lauren Stein got wind of her new neighbors, she saw an opportunity. As the studio behind the juggernaut Outlander TV adaptation, Sony knows the value of a good romance. So execs tapped the Koch sisters to help them find the next great love story, giving them an overall deal to develop romance-focused projects.

Jenn LeBlanc

With the rom-com renaissance well underway, it seems obvious to turn to romance novels for source material, but the Koch sisters say the books are shockingly underutilized. “Hollywood ignores the romance genre as a possibility for adaptation, with the exception of places like Lifetime or Hallmark,” says Koch. “[Because] Hollywood executives are men, and they’re just not that interested in a genre that’s dominated by women.”

But the Koch sisters, and the all-female team they work with at Sony, are aiming to change that—with two highly-confidential projects already in production. Of their work as the cool whisperers’ of romance, Koch says, “[Our goal] is to bridge the gap between Hollywood and the romance community. To bring the authors that our people are really excited about to the screen.”

Samantha Leach is the associate culture editor at Glamour. Follow her on Twitter and Instagram @_sleach.

The Ripped Bodice Was the First Romance Bookstore in the Country. For the Sisters Who Opened It, It’s a Love Story

The Ripped Bodice, which counts Stacey Abrams as a fan, officially opened in the Culver City, California, in 2016. With books hanging from the ceiling, walls of antique bureaus that look like they’re straight from a 19th-century heroine’s boudoir, and a one-eyed Chihuahua roaming the aisles (their bookstore dog, Fitzwilliam Waffles)—it’s every inch the fantasy. But its impact on the community has been real, and meaningful. The shop has become a staple for prominent romance novelists on tour, as well as a bucket-list destination for readers who for far too long felt marginalized within the greater literary world. And in response to their visitors’ frequent requests for more diverse stories—”Customers would walk in the door saying, ‘I want books with an Asian heroine. Do you have any books about people with disabilities, or with Muslim characters?'” says Leah—they now publish an annual diversity report, advocating for more nuanced stories in the genre.

Then in 2018, in true meet-cute fashion, a mystery woman walked into the shop and offered them an opportunity to reach an even wider audience. The Ripped Bodice is only a few blocks away from the Sony Pictures lot. So when executive vice president of drama development Lauren Stein got wind of her new neighbors, she saw an opportunity. As the studio behind the juggernaut Outlander TV adaptation, Sony knows the value of a good romance. So execs tapped the Koch sisters to help them find the next great love story, giving them an overall deal to develop romance-focused projects.

Jenn LeBlanc

With the rom-com renaissance well underway, it seems obvious to turn to romance novels for source material, but the Koch sisters say the books are shockingly underutilized. “Hollywood ignores the romance genre as a possibility for adaptation, with the exception of places like Lifetime or Hallmark,” says Leah. “[Because] Hollywood executives are men, and they’re just not that interested in a genre that’s dominated by women.”

But the Koch sisters, and the all-female team they work with at Sony, are aiming to change that—with two highly confidential projects already in production. Of their work as the cool whisperers of romance, Leah says, “[Our goal] is to bridge the gap between Hollywood and the romance community. To bring the authors that our people are really excited about to the screen.”

Samantha Leach is the associate culture editor at Glamour. Follow her on Twitter and Instagram @_sleach.

Hugh Grant Is Recreating Love Actually Scenes To Try To Stop Brexit

For years, Grant had a reputation as a charming playboy. Reports of his romantic life, coupled with his wink-y, roguish interview style, gave him an appearance more like one of his bad-boy characters than a woke activist. But though his dimples are the same, his behavior has changed over the years. Grant’s Twitter account, complete with a picture of Audrey Hepburn dressed as a nun, posts constant political content. He’s also an active board member at Hacked Off, a campaign to hold press in the UK accountable. His quotes these days contain fewer and fewer witticisms about tea with the Queen and more comments like his August tweet in which he raged against current Prime Minister Boris Johnson, “You will not f**k with my children’s future. You will not destroy the freedoms my grandfather fought two world wars to defend.”

Asked by reporters about his habit of knocking on random doors, Grant referenced a gig from long before his Love Actually days. “I did used to sell fire extinguishers door-to-door,” he said. “I was very good.”

Ah, Hugh! Same dry humor, new desire to make the world a better place for his grandchildren. It’s just like he says—“If you look for it, I’ve got a sneaky feeling you’ll find that love actually is all around.” And if you open your door in London this week, Hugh Grant might actually be all around.

Jenny Singer is a staff writer for Glamour.

Hugh Grant Is Re-Creating ‘Love Actually’ Scenes to Try to Stop Brexit

For years Grant had a reputation as a charming playboy. Reports of his romantic life, coupled with his winky, roguish interview style, gave him a semblance more akin to one of his bad-boy characters than a woke activist. But though his dimples are the same, his behavior has changed over the years. Grant’s Twitter account, complete with a picture of Audrey Hepburn dressed as a nun, posts constant political content. He’s also an active board member at Hacked Off, a campaign to hold the press in the U.K. accountable. His quotes these days contain fewer and fewer witticisms about tea with the queen and more comments like his August tweet in which he raged against current Prime Minister Boris Johnson, “You will not f**k with my children’s future. You will not destroy the freedoms my grandfather fought two world wars to defend.”

Asked by reporters about his habit of knocking on random doors, Grant referenced a gig from long before his Love Actually days. “I did use to sell fire extinguishers door-to-door,” he said. “I was very good.”

Ah, Hugh! Same dry humor, new desire to make the world a better place for his grandchildren. It’s just like he says—“If you look for it, I’ve got a sneaky feeling you’ll find that love actually is all around.” And if you open your door in London this week, Hugh Grant might actually be all around.

Jenny Singer is a staff writer for Glamour.