21 Inspirational Mental Health Quotes

One of the biggest threats to our mental health is the stigma surrounding it–nearly one in five American adults live with a mental illness, but the topic is all-too-often met with silence and shame.

But as these mental health quotes help prove, we can change that.Talking openly about mental health destroys dangerous taboos, normalizes treatment, and reminds us that we are never truly alone in our suffering.

Here are 21 seriously inspirational mental health quotes—from Hollywood actors, pop stars, best-selling authors, psychologists, world leaders, and more—that prove the power we gain from speaking out.

Oprah Winfrey on the importance of conversation

“I’m a good talker,” the cultural icon and media mogul wrote on Oprah.com. “But I soon learned that you can’t talk someone out of depression. Mental illness is real. And like everything else in life, it operates on a spectrum. Though there are common symptoms, everyone experiences it differently. Yet so many people live in shame, hiding their struggles, not seeking help. We, as a culture, have not fully acknowledged how much help is needed. The only real shame is on us for not being willing to speak openly. For continuing to deny that mental health is related to our overall health. We need to start talking, and we need to start now.”

Lady Gaga on asking for help

“If you see somebody that’s hurting, don’t look away,” the pop icon said during the 2019 Grammys while accepting an award for “Shallow” from A Star Is Born. “And if you’re hurting, even though it might be hard, try to find that bravery within yourself to dive deep and go tell somebody and take them up in your head with you.”

Edith Eva Eger on validating your pain

“There is no hierarchy of suffering,” the psychologist and Auschwitz survivor wrote in her 2017 memoir The Choice: Embrace the Possible. “There’s nothing that makes my pain worse or better than yours, no graph on which we can plot the relative importance of one sorrow versus another.”

Barack Obama on combating stigma

“The brain is a body part too; we just know less about it,” the former president said during a national conference on mental health in 2013. “And there should be no shame in discussing or seeking help for treatable illnesses that affect too many people that we love. We’ve got to get rid of that embarrassment; we’ve got to get rid of that stigma. Too many Americans who struggle with mental health illnesses are still suffering in silence rather than seeking help, and we need to see it that men and women who would never hesitate to go see a doctor if they had a broken arm or came down with the flu, that they have that same attitude when it comes to their mental health.”

Beyoncé on guilt-free self-care

“Women have to take the time to focus on our mental health—take time for self, for the spiritual, without feeling guilty or selfish,” the icon told Elle in 2016. “The world will see you the way you see you, and treat you the way you treat yourself.”

Arianna Huffington on self-awareness

“Learning to build self-awareness is so important,” the author and businesswoman wrote for Fortune last year. “When we know ourselves—the sources of our stress, how we respond, and what actions help us recharge—we’re far better able to minimize the damage. We can’t eliminate stress, but we can learn to manage it.

J.K. Rowling on pride in overcoming

“I have never been remotely ashamed of having been depressed. Never,” the Harry Potter series author told a student journalist in 2008. “What’s to be ashamed of? I went through a really rough time and I am quite proud that I got out of that.”

Troian Bellisario on normalizing your emotions

“It’s totally normal for you to feel like somedays you might be overwhelmingly sad, or some days you might be very angry,” the Pretty Little Liars actress said in a 2019 video for Child Mind Institute’s #MyYoungerSelf campaign. “Some days you might be really happy, and all of these feelings are real, and they’re legitimate, and they’re yours. And you just need to give them time and space. You don’t need to feel like you need to hide them or you need to push them away, because they’re your feelings and you are an incredible person, you’re a sensitive person, and there’s space for them.”

Terri Cheney on how to talk about mental illness

“After a lifetime of living with a mental illness, I’ve discovered that the most helpful thing someone can say to me when I’m suffering is, ‘Tell me where it hurts’,” the author told Glamour last year. “I don’t want advice. I don’t want to be cheered up. I just want to be listened to and truly heard. The pain is much more bearable when I’m allowed to open up and share it.”

Tracy Clayton on anxiety

“Before I was formally introduced to my anxiety, I called it by a bunch of other names—nervousness, weakness, timidity,” the writer and podcast host shared in a 2015 essay for BuzzFeed. “Employers called it laziness, distractedness, and ‘not being a team player.’ My ex called it clinginess. My mother called it oversensitivity and immaturity. But we were all wrong, and learning that we were all wrong, that there was an actual medical thing going on, overwhelmed me because it meant that it wasn’t a tornado of character flaws that landed me where I was. The problem was not that I simply chose not to be ‘normal,’ that I allowed my fears, baseless as they may have been, to conquer and dictate so much of my life. The problem was my brain. It was a chemical imbalance, something physical, not imagined.”

Nikki Webber Allen on the power of feelings

“Having feelings isn’t a sign of weakness,” the producer and activist said in a 2017 Ted Talk. “Feelings mean we’re human. And when we deny our humanity, it leaves us feeling empty inside, searching for ways to self-medicate in order to fill the void…These days, I share my story openly, and I ask others to share theirs, too. I believe that’s what it takes to help people who may be suffering in silence to know that they are not alone and to know that with help, they can heal.”

Matt Haig on resiliency

“And one night I lay awake, feeling less than happy. I started to worry. The worries spiraled,” the author wrote in his 2015 book Reasons to Stay Alive, which chronicles his struggle with depression. “And for three weeks I was trapped in my own mind again. But this time, I had weapons. One of them, maybe the most important, was this knowledge: I have been ill before, then well again. Wellness is possible.”

Anne Hathaway on collective suffering

“We all walk around sometimes feeling like we have an elephant on our chest, but we’re not alone,” the actress said in an interview with Glamour last year. “And we’re not less than because of that. We’re not unlovable because of that.”

Jon Hamm on the benefits of therapy

“Medical attention is medical attention whether it’s for your elbow or for your teeth or for your brain,” the actor said in a 2017 interview with InStyle. “And it’s important. We live in a world where to admit anything negative about yourself is seen as a weakness, when it’s actually a strength. It’s not a weak move to say, ‘I need help.’ In the long run it’s way better, because you have to fix it.”

Carrie Fisher on bipolar disorder

“One of the things that baffles me (and there are quite a few) is how there can be so much lingering stigma with regards to mental illness, specifically bipolar disorder,” the late actress wrote in her 2008 book Wishful Drinking. “In my opinion, living with manic depression takes a tremendous amount of balls. Not unlike a tour of Afghanistan (though the bombs and bullets, in this case, come from the inside). At times, being bipolar can be an all-consuming challenge, requiring a lot of stamina and even more courage, so if you’re living with this illness and functioning at all, it’s something to be proud of, not ashamed of.”

Fred Rogers on talking about your feelings

“Anything that’s human is mentionable, and anything that is mentionable can be more manageable,” the children’s TV host said, according to the 2005 book Life’s Journeys According to Mister Rogers. “When we can talk about our feelings, they become less overwhelming, less upsetting, and less scary. The people we trust with that important talk can help us know that we are not alone.”

Selena Gomez on destigmatizing therapy

“I wish more people would talk about therapy,” the actress and singer told Vogue in 2017. “We girls, we’re taught to be almost too resilient, to be strong and sexy and cool and laid-back, the girl who’s down. We also need to feel allowed to fall apart.”

Shaun David Hutchinson on depression

“You may have depression, but you are not depression. Stop telling yourself you are,” the writer shared in an essay published in the 2018 book (Don’t) Call Me Crazy: 33 Voices Start the Conversation About Mental Health. “Wake up every day and tell yourself that your thoughts and your words belong to you. No one is allowed to undermine who you are by defining you on their terms. Depression is a disease, a collection of symptoms. It is not a human being. It is not a person.”

Kristen Bell on the power of communal action

“We’re all on team human here, and let’s be honest—it’s not an easy team to be on,” the actress wrote in a 2016 essay published by Motto.“It’s stressful and taxing and worrisome, but it’s also fulfilling and beautiful and bright. In order for all of us to experience the full breadth of team human, we have to communicate. Talking about how you’re feeling is the first step to helping yourself. Depression is a problem that actually has so many solutions. Let’s work together to find those solutions for each other and cast some light on a dark situation.”

Rachel Griffin on acceptance

“Dear Person With Mental Illness,” the musician, songwriter, and mental health advocate wrote in an open letter published by The Huffington Post in 2015. “You are not a monster. You are a valuable, unique, wonderful human being who deserves everything grand that this life has to offer. Come out of the shadows and stand proudly in who you are. You are not damaged. You are whole, regardless of having a mental illness. I like you the way you are. I wouldn’t change you. I see you differently than you see yourself. I am not afraid of you or your illness…I am amazed by you. I am amazed by your courage, willpower, gifts and talents. I accept you, and your worlds of light and darkness.”

David D. Burns on avoiding labels

“Labeling yourself is not only self-defeating; it is irrational,” the psychiatrist wrote in his book Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy, first published in 1980. “Your self cannot be equated with any one thing you do. Your life is a complex and every-changing flow of thoughts, emotions, and actions. To put it another way, you are more like a river than a statue. Stop trying to define yourself with negative labels—they are overly simplistic and wrong.”

15 Best Waterproof Mascaras for Smudge & Sweatproof Lashes 2020

Few things deliver such instant satisfaction as longer, darker lashes. The best waterproof mascaras do all that more. A really great formula takes everything you love about the all-time best mascaras—falsie-level length, major volume, long wear—and gives it the power to withstand whatever you throw at it, whether that’s a beach day, a workout, or your run-of-the-mill grocery run on an 80 degree summer day.

But waterproof formulas are also notoriously tricky. By nature, tough-acting, sweat-proof options tend to be drier, clump faster, and leave your lashes feeling brittle and hard. Or they’re a huge pain to take off at the end of the day. So if you’re new to the game or you’re still wondering if the perfect waterproof mascara really does exist, here are a few basics to keep in mind.

Is waterproof mascara better than regular mascara?

There’s no clear-cut answer here because choosing a waterproof mascara largely depends on what any given day looks like for you. If you have a sweaty yoga class coming up, opting for a smudge-proof formula might be your best bet. The same goes if you live in a humidity hellscape, which can wreak havoc on even the most minimal no-makeup makeup look. But if you have fine or fragile lashes, you might want to avoid heavy-duty water-resistant formulas, since taking them off could tug or pull your lashes out.

How to remove waterproof mascara

The last thing you want to do is damage or lose lashes while taking your makeup off, so arming yourself with a great makeup remover is key. Soak a reusable cotton pad with a liquid formula or gently hold a micellar wipe to your lashes for 10 seconds to remove—just be sure not to rub or tug on the delicate eye area. If stubborn remnants continue to cling to your lashes, try nudging it free with a soaked Q-tip.

Now that we’ve got that out of the way, let’s talk options. We polled Glamour editors with strong opinions on the topic, and they didn’t hold back in their reviews. Here are the best waterproof mascaras that withstand workouts, Nicholas Sparks movies, Queer Eye marathons, and—yes—even virtual weddings.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Chrissy Teigen Revealed She’s Having Her Breast Implants Removed

To know Chrissy Teigen (or at least her social media persona) is to love her candor and openness about her own life. So it’s no surprise that she recently let the world in on a big decision: She’s having surgery to remove her breast implants.

The conversation actually began after Teigen posted a video where she was receiving a test for COVID-19. There was some backlash online, like the person who tweeted, “Man, I wish I had the privilege of being tested,” at which point she replied, “Everyone in L.A. can get tested for free. I’m having surgery and had to. I’m sorry if this offends you.”

After getting a number of questions from fans, Teigen decided to explain the situation further on Instagram. “Hi hi! So I posted myself getting a COVID test on the Twitter, as I’m getting surgery soon. A lot of people are understandably curious (and nosey!) so I’ll just say it here: I’m getting my boobs out!” she wrote in true Chrissy Teiten style. “They’ve been great to me for many years but I’m just over it. I’d like to be able to zip a dress in my size, lay on my belly with pure comfort! No biggie! So don’t worry about me! All good. I’ll still have boobs, they’ll just be pure fat. Which is all a tit is in the first place. A dumb, miraculous bag of fat. ❤️”

Teigen received lots of positive support in the comments. “Life changing, you’re gonna love it. I got mine out last year. They were making me so sick. 😍,” Ayesha Curry commented. Meanwhile, Erin Foster had jokes, “Can I take the ones your chucking. They look great. Sisterhood of the traveling boob.” One fan wrote, “You go gurl!! You look beautiful no matter what!! I’ve been wanting mine out for years!!! Love how you share the ups and downs of Womenhood [sic], Motherhood, and just being silly during this lockdown!!”

We love seeing women supporting women making their own decisions about what’s right for their bodies. Hope the surgery goes well, Chrissy!

Love Life Review: Anna Kendrick’s Series Is Like Sex and the City

“It would be exactly, like almost verbatim, a conversation I’ve had with someone,” she says. “They’d be like, ‘No, we never talked about that.’ It’s amazing how universal some of these experiences are.”

Jin Ha plays Augie, one of Darby’s first romances in the series

HBO Max

One storyline that did make it in: Kendrick, who is also an executive producer on the series, says she pushed to include a “d-bag” character. “I felt like, in my experience, women don’t make it out of their twenties without dating one guy who’s a little scary,” she says. “The degree to which he’s scary varies for everybody, and I didn’t want turn it into an after-school special, but I do think that’s something worth exploring.” I’ll refrain from spoiling how that manifests for Darby but…yeah, Kendrick is spot-on.

And Kendrick wasn’t the only one on set whose dating experiences made it onto screen. “Every time I make a comment about a line that makes me laugh, someone is like, ‘Oh, that’s because that exact thing happened to me,'” she says. Using a Paperless Post invitation to figure out where an ex will be on Saturday night, for example. “It’s so specific but so real.”

Of course, this wouldn’t be a good rom-com series without a best friend with her own messy love story to tell. Zoë Chao is a revelation as Sara, keeping the character from falling into the wacky BFF trope by giving her necessary depth. If Darby is a Carrie with Charlotte tendencies, Sara is a Samantha all the way.

Zoë Chao and Anna Kendrick in Love Life

HBO Max

“She’s really funny and spontaneous and wild,” says Chao. “But also destructive and depressed and sad and confused. We get to explore all of those chapters.” One of the most heartbreaking episodes of the season is devoted to Sara and Darby’s relationship—boyfriends come and go, but seeing two friends wonder if they’ve outgrown each other cuts deep. “I really like Sara because I understand her a lot through her love of Darby,” Chao adds. “This friendship is very real, and it’s nice to see a female friendship where oftentimes they’re taking care of each other in a really nurturing way.”

That’s ultimately what the show is going for, Kendrick says—that realness, the feeling of recognition. “That’s the best thing, isn’t it?” she says. “Whether it’s a non-fiction book or a movie or anything, it’s recognition that you’ve had an experience and somebody else is talking about it. It just makes you feel less alone.”

Anna Moeslein is a senior editor at Glamour. Follow her on Instagram @annamoeslein.

Kensington Palace Responds to Claims Kate Middleton Is ‘Furious’ About Her New Workload

Kensington Palace issued a rare statement on Tuesday night, May 26, after a story about Kate Middleton was published in the British magazine Tatler.

Gossip-filled stories about the royal family run regularly, but it’s not often that palace spokespeople weigh in on them. The Cambridges’s team clearly felt strongly enough about claimed falsehoods in the Tatler story that they issued a response, according to multiple sources, including Entertainment Tonight. “This story contains a swathe of inaccuracies and false misrepresentations which were not put to Kensington Palace prior to publication,” the palace said.

Royals reporter Rebecca English also tweeted about the statement. “It’s rare for any of the royal households to issue such a vehement statement and indicates the depth of their ire,” she wrote.

So what made the palace so angry? Well, since they don’t call out specific inaccuracies, we can’t be totally sure. But there are some very salacious claims made in the piece—all by anonymous sources—like how the Duchess of Cambridge is angry about her increased workload due to Meghan Markle and Prince Harry‘s decision to step down as senior working royals. “Kate is furious about the larger workload. Of course she’s smiling and dressing appropriately but she doesn’t want this,” an alleged friend of the duchess told the magazine. “She feels exhausted and trapped. She’s working as hard as a top CEO, who has to be wheeled out all the time, without the benefits of boundaries and plenty of holidays.”

“Kate understands that the only credo of the royal family is duty, duty, duty,” an alleged royal courtier said. “Whereas with the Sussexes it is constant uncertainty, [the Cambridges] represent stability and continuity.”

Another gossip-y item in the article asserts there was some kind of rift between Middleton and Markle dating back to the Duchess of Sussex’s wedding. “Then there was an incident at the wedding rehearsal. It was a hot day and apparently there was a row over whether the bridesmaids should wear tights or not,” a “friend” of the Cambridges told Tatler. “Kate, following protocol, felt that they should. Meghan didn’t want them to.” Another supposed palace insider seemed to want to continue the Kate vs. Meghan narrative: “In the palace, you hear numerous stories of the staff saying so-and-so is a nightmare and behaves badly but you never hear that about Kate,” they said.

Needless to say, there is a lot that Kate Middleton, Prince William, and Kensington Palace might take issue with. Tatler has not yet responded to the palace’s rebuttal of the story.

The Big Bang Theory’s 12 Best Episodes—and the Stories Behind Them

But that doesn’t mean you can’t reminisce. So to celebrate Big Bang‘s launch on HBO Max, I picked the 12 best. It wasn’t easy: The series ran for 279 episodes, so 12 episodes accounts for less than five percent. And my final picks weren’t about finding the best moments or scenes, of which there are plenty, but rather the funniest episodes overall. I loved Shamy’s wedding episode, for example, but it was so guest-star heavy that it took away from the rhythm you get when the seven main characters are involved. From 279 episodes, I narrowed the list down to 40, then 20, and then 14. From there, I called in reinforcements—Molaro and Holland—to weigh in on my choices and narrow it down to 12 (in chronological order).

For over an hour, they laughed and reminisced with me and took turns guessing what each episode was about based on the those hard-to-remember episode titles. Since we’re not going to get a Friends-like reunion just yet, this was the next best thing. From never-before-heard-stories to the inspiration behind various plot points, get ready to revisit Big Bang‘s best—and learn something new in the process.

1. The Pilot (Season 1, episode 1; September 24, 2007)

In the series premiere, roommates Leonard and Sheldon meet new neighbor, Penny, who Leonard has a secret crush on.

Greg Gayne

The first scene starts out at a sperm bank, where Sheldon is planning on making a donation. When I mention that I can’t believe Sheldon would do that, Steve Holland jokes, “Neither can [co-creator] Chuck Lorre!” In fact, it was so out of character that the scene was later cut from re-runs. “I’m sure it’s on the DVDs,” Holland says, “but Chuck felt that scene was a mistake.”

It’s still an iconic episode high on laughs as Penny, Leonard, and Sheldon meet for the first time and go back and forth saying hi and bye. Other great moments: a MySpace reference, Howard’s Nintendo controller belt, and Penny unknowingly sitting in Sheldon’s spot. “I look at them and get emotional because they’re babies,” Molaro says. “It’s like looking at old movies of your kids.” It’s also when Leonard says he’s going to be the father of Penny’s babies and they’ll be “smart and beautiful”—a line that was echoed in the finale when Penny and Leonard found out she’s pregnant.

Fun fact: Chuck Lorre wanted Howard Wolowitz to have a Beatles-style haircut, Molaro reveals. Also, the episode as a whole wasn’t a favorite of Molaro’s. “It’s been years and years since I watched it, and I remember my wife liking the pilot more than I did,” he says while laughing. “I thought it was OK.”

2. The Adhesive Duck Deficiency (Season 3; episode 8; November 16, 2009)

Penny dislocates her shoulder in the shower and Sheldon has to come to her rescue. Meanwhile, Leonard, Howard, and Raj get high while camping in the desert.

“Boy, that’s so good,” Steve Holland says of the episode that saw Sheldon awkwardly come to Penny’s aid. Whether it was driving Penny to the ER or helping get her shirt over her head (and accidentally touching her breast), Sheldon had to come to terms with his fear of intimacy—both physical and emotional. And unlike “The Bath Item Gift Hypothesis,” which saw Sheldon and Penny separated for most of the episode, “The Adhesive Duck Deficiency” put Kaley Cuoco and Jim Parsons together, which is always advised. If there was ever an odd couple, this was it. Says Cuoco of the episode, “Jim and I laughed so hard while shooting the scene where he puts my shirt on. We couldn’t keep a straight face.” Oh, and Penny asks for a “Soft Kitty” duet at the end. Says Holland, “We didn’t try to overuse it, but every time we brought it out it felt good and fun.”

‘The Big Bang Theory,’ Its 12 Best Episodes—and the Stories Behind Them

But that doesn’t mean you can’t reminisce. So to celebrate Big Bang’s launch on HBO Max, I picked the 12 best. It wasn’t easy: The series ran for 279 episodes, so 12 episodes accounts for less than 5%. And my final picks weren’t about finding the best moments or scenes, of which there are plenty, but rather the funniest episodes overall. I loved Shamy’s wedding episode, for example, but it was so guest-star heavy that it took away from the rhythm you get when the seven main characters are involved. From 279 episodes, I narrowed the list down to 40, then 20, and then 14. From there, I called in reinforcements—Molaro and Holland—to weigh in on my choices and narrow it down to 12 (in chronological order).

For over an hour, they laughed and reminisced with me and took turns guessing what each episode was about based on the those hard-to-remember episode titles. Since we’re not going to get a Friends-like reunion just yet, this was the next best thing. From never-before-heard-stories to the inspiration behind various plot points, get ready to revisit Big Bang’s best—and learn something new in the process.

1. The Pilot (season 1, episode 1; September 24, 2007)

In the series premiere, roommates Leonard and Sheldon meet new neighbor Penny, whom Leonard has a secret crush on.

Greg Gayne

The first scene starts out at a sperm bank, where Sheldon is planning on making a donation. When I mention that I can’t believe Sheldon would do that, Steve Holland jokes, “Neither can [cocreator] Chuck Lorre!” In fact, it was so out of character that the scene was later cut from reruns. “I’m sure it’s on the DVDs,” Holland says, “but Chuck felt that scene was a mistake.”

It’s still an iconic episode high on laughs as Penny, Leonard, and Sheldon meet for the first time and go back and forth saying hi and bye. Other great moments: a MySpace reference, Howard’s Nintendo-controller belt, and Penny unknowingly sitting in Sheldon’s spot. “I look at them and get emotional because they’re babies,” Molaro says. “It’s like looking at old movies of your kids.” It’s also when Leonard says he’s going to be the father of Penny’s babies and they’ll be “smart and beautiful”—a line echoed in the finale when Penny and Leonard find out she’s pregnant.

Fun fact: Chuck Lorre wanted Howard Wolowitz to have a Beatles-style haircut, Molaro reveals. Also, the episode as a whole wasn’t a favorite of Molaro’s. “It’s been years and years since I watched it, and I remember my wife liking the pilot more than I did,” he says, laughing. “I thought it was okay.”

2. The Adhesive Duck Deficiency (season 3, episode 8; November 16, 2009)

Penny dislocates her shoulder in the shower and Sheldon has to come to her rescue. Meanwhile, Leonard, Howard, and Raj get high while camping in the desert.

“Boy, that’s so good,” Steve Holland says of the episode that saw Sheldon awkwardly come to Penny’s aid. Whether it was driving Penny to the E.R. or helping her get her shirt over her head (and accidentally touching her breast), Sheldon had to come to terms with his fear of intimacy—both physical and emotional. And unlike “The Bath Item Gift Hypothesis,” which saw Sheldon and Penny separated for most of the episode, “The Adhesive Duck Deficiency” put Kaley Cuoco and Jim Parsons together, which is always advised. If there was ever an odd couple, this was it. Says Cuoco of the episode, “Jim and I laughed so hard while shooting the scene where he puts my shirt on. We couldn’t keep a straight face.” Oh, and Penny asks for a “Soft Kitty” duet at the end. Says Holland, “We didn’t try to overuse it, but every time we brought it out it felt good and fun.”

Lady Gaga and Ariana Grande Filmed a Second ‘Rain on Me’ Video That’s Even Better Than the First

Lady Gaga and Ariana Grande gave the world a massive present on Friday, May 22 in the form of their new song, “Rain on Me.” Cut for Gaga’s sixth studio album, Chromatica (out May 29), the track is an instantly catchy, 90s house-inspired smash. It’s tailor-made for the dance floor and a strong candidate for 2020’s song of the summer.

The music video for “Rain on Me” also dropped May 22, and it’s one of Gaga’s most dazzling yet (which is saying something). Shot pre-quarantine, the clip is an elaborate, electric, choreography and rain-soaked pop extravaganza, complete with multiple costume changes and makeup looks begging to be replicated. It’s already racked up nearly 50 million views in just a few days.

That one clip alone was enough to satiate fans until Chromatica‘s release, but Gaga, ever the generous pop star, decided to give fans a surprise on Tuesday, May 26: a second video for “Rain on Me.” And for this one, Gaga and Ari are full-on comedy queens.

They play weather women in the minute-long clip, which includes umbrellas, fake water, and lots of cheeky banter. The song itself isn’t played, but they say “Rain on me!” enough times for you to get the point.

The video never once feels shamelessly promotional, though. It’s quite funny, and Gaga and Ari are clearly in on the joke with their broadcaster-parody voices. At the end, we even see Gaga turn to the person pouring water on her and say, “I think it was good. I don’t know!” Oscars! Oscars for everyone!

Watch the clip for yourself, below:

And check out the main video for “Rain on Me” here:

Ariana Grande is just one of three collaborators on Lady Gaga’s Chromatica. She also has songs with BLACKPINK (“Sour Candy”) and Elton John (“Sine From Above”). Are you ready for it?

All of Reese Witherspoon’s Romantic Comedies, Ranked

Reese Witherspoon has been called America’s Sweetheart for a reason. (Even if she doesn’t agree with it.) She’s sunshine and goodness, a cheerleader beauty queen with a heart of gold. But she’s got spitfire in her, too—that Southern spirit makes her charming, but also a little dangerous.

It comes out in her best work. In Election, she was as irrepressible as she was fearsome. In Walk the Line, she struck the perfect balance between ladylike and lady boss (and won an Oscar for it). In Vanity Fair, she was a social climber; in Wild, a literal climber (well, hiker). In her current incarnation as a powerhouse star and producer of prestige television, she’s a little more hardened but also more inspirational. The message of a Reese Witherspoon character is always this: You simply cannot keep the gal down.

That cheerful tenacity also makes Witherspoon a great leading lady for romantic comedies. Like fellow rom-com queens Julia Roberts, Jennifer Lopez, Sandra Bullock, and Meg Ryan, Witherspoon can play it innocent when she needs to and sassy when she wants to. Always likable, but sharp enough to believably kick ass at work, home, love, whatever.

One thing that makes movies of the Witherspoon rom-com canon stand out, however, is that they tend to have some other element mixed in, be they action-comedy hybrids or quasi-gimmicky holiday fare. Straight-up romantic comedies were a little out of style by the time Witherspoon hit the scene, but that also makes sense for the actor herself. Try to picture Witherspoon sitting around waiting for the phone to ring, or even just relaxing at the spa. You can’t. Now picture her with a newspaper in one hand, a drink in the other, and she’s going to read out the headlines or splash that cocktail in someone’s face. Or both.

This mixing of genres also means that even when her romantic comedies aren’t great—there are a few stinkers in everyone’s career, sorry—they’re never boring. And Witherspoon, to her absolute credit, never gives less than a hundred percent commitment to a part. She’s always doing her best to make the material work. When it clicks, it really clicks. So put on your Draper James wrap dress and pour yourself a whiskey in a teacup, because it’s time to rank the romantic comedies of Reese Witherspoon.

Home Again (2017)

This movie made so little impression on me that I barely remember the plot, but here’s what I think happens: Reese Witherspoon plays the daughter of a famous, now deceased, Hollywood screenwriter (producer?), and she and her kids (two daughters?) live in a beautiful house somewhere in or around Los Angeles, and the kitchen is especially beautiful because this movie was directed by Nancy Meyers’ daughter, Hallie Meyers-Shyer. Reese is, I think, divorced, and two (maybe three?) young guys in their twenties who want to be screenwriters come to live at her house. She flirts a bunch with one of them. By the end, one of her kids has performed some original story in a talent show, maybe, and after they all have a big family dinner in the backyard. She reconciles with her ex-husband, or something. Anyway, this movie is boring and even the charm of Reese Witherspoon can’t save it.

This Means War (2012)

If you were to just watch certain scenes from This Means War, you might think it was a fun, featherweight action romantic-comedy about two best friend CIA agents (Chris Pine and Tom Hardy, both so cute) who fall in love with the same woman. But actually, it’s a completely nonsensical, borderline psychotic battle between two CIA agents who lie to, gaslight, and spy on a woman while they essentially use her as the ruler in their dick-measuring contest. They bug her house, spy on her with thermal binoculars, and put a tracking device on her phone. Not only that, the guy she ends up choosing is straight-up mean to her at the beginning of their relationship. It’s not flirty banter or opposites attracting—he’s just a dick. And Pine’s character’s name is FDR. People call him that: FDR. Bewildering.

How Do You Know (2010)

This movie is not good by any stretch, but it’s sort of an interesting mess for those of us who have seen enough romantic comedies to know how they are supposed to go—or at least, how they usually go. They are, usually, about flawed but charming people looking for love and fulfillment and either finding it or losing it and learning something along the way. Not so with How Do You Know. Instead, Reese Witherspoon plays a former softball player who drifts aimlessly in and out of relationships with Owen Wilson and Paul Rudd while Jack Nicholson commits some kind of investment fraud and tries to get his son to take the blame for it. It’s like if the movie Wall Street were re-engineered so that the protagonist was neither Bud Fox nor Gordon Gekko but a former softball player named Lisa Jorgenson. In what world is Reese Witherspoon believable as a “Lisa,” let alone a “Lisa Jorgenson?”

Penelope (2007)

A baby girl is born to an aristocratic family that, thanks to a long-ago wrongdoing, is cursed so that the infant has a pig nose. Will she find love? Acceptance? Happiness? A new nose? Spoiler: Yes to all of the above! Though the plot itself is overly complicated, there are some winning moments and charming performances in this movie, not to mention a much-needed message, and the title character of Penelope is perfect for someone like Witherspoon. Problem is, it’s played by Christina Ricci. Ricci totally makes it work, I have zero issue with her acting in this or any other movie, but the glowing dynamo of Witherspoon gets shoved to the side and instead plays…some chick at a bar who shows the princess how to live among the people. It’s a waste in a movie that wasn’t spectacular to begin with.

Four Christmases (2008)

It’s like the title says, friends: four Christmases. Witherspoon and Vince Vaughn play a long-term couple wary of marriage because both of their parental sets have split. Conveniently, though, they all live in California, hence the challenge of hitting four separate celebrations over the course of Christmas Day. It’s not a laugh riot, but on a personal note, as the daughter of divorced parents who get along and split custody during my childhood, I appreciate that this movie shows the holidays being less a time for emotional catharsis and more a logistical headache. Been there.

Sweet Home Alabama (2002)

I struggled with the decision to keep this movie out of the top three. I know a lot of people like it, and it was a huge, huge hit. But I’m sorry, I was never that into it! Don’t get me wrong, there’s plenty to like: Candice Bergen, the proposal scene at Tiffany’s, Witherspoon’s performance. But the plot has the opposite problem from How Do You Know: It leans way too far into cliche. You can take the girl out of the South, but you can’t take the South out of the girl! Which do you follow, your head or your heart? Career versus love! It’s like every rom-com trope rolled together and set to a Lynyrd Skynyrd song with messy political connotations (though it’s a bop, I’m not an idiot). Fun enough, but not a classic.

Just Like Heaven (2005)

For most romantic comedies, the fun is in the journey so spoilers don’t make a huge difference. But Just Like Heaven is also dramatic and fantastical; if you haven’t seen it, I strongly urge you to stop reading this passage now because the twists and turns this movie takes are heartbreaking, magical, delightful. Oh, you’re still here? Well, fine, have it your way. Here’s the plot: Landscape designer David (Mark Ruffalo), mourning the death of his wife, moves into a new apartment and soon discovers that it’s haunted by doctor Elizabeth (Witherspoon), though she doesn’t realize at first that she is a ghost and refuses to believe she’s dead. Turns out, she isn’t; she’s in a coma. David and Elizabeth fall in love, but Elizabeth is due to be taken off of life support, and then…nope! Not gonna tell you what happens! You have to go watch it. It’ll make you cry, and you will be grateful that I let you discover the ending for yourself.

The Importance of Being Earnest (2002)

A quintessential romantic comedy, a story that helped shape and define the genre. Adapted from the Oscar Wilde play of the same name, this movie has everything a rom-com fan could possibly want: a little farce, a little trickery, a little love triangle, a lot of happy ending. Colin Firth, Rupert Everett, and Reese Witherspoon in a period piece together…and oh, would you look at that, simply by speaking those three names out loud a glass of chardonnay has appeared in my hand and my mom is on the couch next to me. Hi mom, love you, let’s queue it up.

Legally Blonde (2001)

Legally Blonde is not, strictly speaking, a “romantic comedy” film. It’s a courtroom thriller, a coming-of-age story, a testament to the power of friendship, a feminist polemic, an anti-sexual-harassment story, an animal rights film, a campus comedy, and a turn-of-the-millennium fashion tour de force. And, sure, it has a romantic subplot that actually sticks closely to the typical beats of the rom-com genre. Elle, though happy and fulfilled by her life as a sorority girl, still wants to prove herself a woman to be taken seriously, and the catalyst for her journey of self-discovery is an attempt to win back her handsome, rich ex Warner. But like any good rom-com heroine, she discovers that the man who is truly her equal is the humble and supportive TA Emmet. Once she learns to believe in herself—and her mind (she exonerates an innocent aerobics guru falsely accused of murder!)—she can accept his love and start a much healthier relationship. This is, by the way, why the sequel is not on this list: Her relationship with Emmet is already intact, ipso facto, not a rom-com.

Best of all, tucked within Legally Blonde is a story that is a full-on utter and complete romantic comedy: the tale of Paulette. She ditches her shabby ex, learns to arch her back, and bangs her hot delivery guy. There’s a reason why it’s also a beloved musical, and why it’s getting another installment written by Mindy Kaling. An absolute masterwork.

Elizabeth Logan is a writer and comedian in New York City. Follow her on Twitter @lizzzzzielogan.

19 Kitchen Essentials Everyone Needs, According to Professional Chefs

Even as social distancing restriction lift, your newfound cooking hobby doesn’t have to go anywhere. With the right kitchen essentials, you can still bake banana bread every weekend, or try your hand at recreating Disney’s best recipes (Tonga Toast, anyone?).

To find out what the undisputed kitchen essentials actually are, we asked six top-notch chefs and food bloggers about the tools they use every day. From Chloe Coscarelli’s secret to a “snowstorm” of powdered sugar to the under-$200 knife set Sophia Roe swears by, consider this your vetted kitchen essentials list to start cooking like a pro.

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