Amazon’s 10 Bestselling Books of 2019

2019 was a year for the books. Literally. Throughout the year, authors published works that inspired us, challenged us, and also gave us an escape. We saw new work from legendary author Margaret Atwood, were floored by newcomer Casey McQuiston’s debut romance novel, Red White & Royal Blue, and couldn’t get enough of author and survivor Chanel Miller’s triumphant memoir, Know My Name. Our “TBR” lists were long, and rich with incredible reading material.

As 2019 comes to a close, Amazon decided to take a look back at some of their most popular titles of the year. The books that customers shopped the most. From Michelle Obama’s memoir, Becoming—which was the highest-selling work of non-fiction on the site—to Delia Owens’ New York Times bestselling Where the Crawdads Sing.

Read on for the books that Amazon customers couldn’t get enough of. And consider giving your loved ones a break from the world for the holidays—through the power of the written word.

Most Sold Books, Fiction

Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens

Amazon

$10

Buy Now

The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

Amazon

$14

Buy Now

Treasure Island: An Audible Original Drama by Robert Louis Stevenson and Marty Ross

Buy Now

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

Buy Now

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

Amazon

$16

Buy Now

Most Sold Books, Non-Fiction

Becoming by Michelle Obama

Amazon

$12

Buy Now

Educated by Tara Westover

Amazon

$14

Buy Now

Girl, Stop Apologizing by Rachel Hollis

Amazon

$10

Buy Now

Girl, Wash Your Face by Rachel Hollis

Amazon

$13

Buy Now

Can’t Hurt Me by David Goggins

Amazon

$18

Buy Now

Amazon’s 10 Best-Selling Books of 2019

This was a year for the books. Literally. Throughout 2019, authors published works that inspired us, challenged us, and also gave us an escape. We saw new work from legendary author Margaret Atwood, were floored by newcomer Casey McQuiston’s debut romance novel, Red, White & Royal Blue, and couldn’t get enough of author and survivor Chanel Miller‘s triumphant memoir, Know My Name. Our TBR lists were long, and rich with incredible reading material.

As 2019 comes to a close, Amazon takes a look back at some of their most popular titles of the year. The books that customers shopped the most. From Michelle Obama’s memoir, Becoming—which was the highest-selling work of nonfiction on the site—to Delia Owens’s New York Times–best-selling Where the Crawdads Sing.

Read on for the books that Amazon customers couldn’t get enough of. And consider giving your loved ones a break from the world for the holidays—through the power of the written word.

Most Sold Books, Fiction

Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens

Amazon

$10

Buy Now

The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

Amazon

$14

Buy Now

Treasure Island: An Audible Original Drama by Robert Louis Stevenson and Marty Ross

Buy Now

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

Buy Now

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

Amazon

$16

Buy Now

Most Sold Books, Nonfiction

Becoming by Michelle Obama

Amazon

$12

Buy Now

Educated by Tara Westover

Amazon

$14

Buy Now

Girl, Stop Apologizing by Rachel Hollis

Amazon

$10

Buy Now

Girl, Wash Your Face by Rachel Hollis

Amazon

$13

Buy Now

Can’t Hurt Me by David Goggins

Amazon

$18

Buy Now

Leave The Peloton Bike Ad Lady Alone

Peloton, a company that sells (checks notes) bikes that don’t go anywhere, is worth nearly 10 billion dollars. But the latest Peloton Bike ad—you know, the 30-second spot that went viral and drew comparisons to the brainwashed family from Get Out—just lost the company almost one billion dollars and sparked an endless stream of Twitter hot takes.

In case you’ve been sitting this internet controversy out, the infamous ad—which shows a woman receiving a Peloton bike from her husband for Christmas, then tracking her progress over the year by vlogging her rides—touched a nerve with millions of people. Critics called it “sexist,” “body shaming,” “abusive” and “dystopian.” Something about the sleek aesthetic of the ad, coupled with a plot involving a man getting his wife exercise equipment—equipment she takes to like a hamster on a wheel—unleashed a kind of public anguish.

Comedian Eva Victor’s very funny parody of the ad has over three million views:

Watch the ad for yourself:

Normally we’re all for any outcry about perceived sexism. But the intensity of the anger over the Peloton bike ad has its own eeriness. The woman in the ad is not being “abused” or “controlled,” and insistence that she is suggests that women can’t make their own choices about their desires and their bodies. America has an obsession with thinness, and that can’t be disentangled from exercise crazes like Peloton. But it’s also oddly disrespectful to act like exercising—albeit on fancy equipment and for social media glory—is something women do solely to please men. It’s just more complicated than that.

It’s ironic that the company so garbled their message in this ad, because so many women have been open about finding friendship and wellness through Peloton that have nothing to do with fitness—or their partners. The hundreds of thousands of women who have created networks based on their at-home workouts can’t be reduced to a reaction to the male gaze. How hard would it have been to make an ad about what so many Peloton women actually seem to have a cult-like devotion to: community.

Maybe part of the anger over the Peloton bike ad is how accurately it reflects consumerism right now, and how uncomfortable that makes us. Peloton Lady and her (maybe evil) Peloton Husband live in a pristine, open concept house with hardwood floors, high windows, and one very well-behaved child. Peloton Lady’s skin is dewey but matte. She comes home from work in block-heeled pumps and a cream-colored coat with a statement lip. She wakes up in matching menswear separates. Everything the Peloton family owns is minimalist but perfect, like it all came from prestige direct-to-consumer startup brands.

It’s a very 2019 fantasy. And when we see clearly that our deeply held fantasy is also a carefully calculated bid by a private company to make money, it suddenly feels more like a nightmare. Friends, Romans, countrymen determined to rescue Peloton Lady from her living hell, consider this hot take: The Peloton Lady isn’t a hostage, but we are.

Jenny Singer is a staff writer for Glamour.

43 Best Gifts for Kids in 2019: Shop for Babies, Toddlers, Tweens, and Teens

If Cyber Monday was any indication, there’s no shortage of gifts for kids on the market right now. But little ones are discerning and, adorably, some of the harshest critics out there, so you’re going to want presents that impress—and won’t end up in the back of their closet. A gift that won’t just make their eyes glow, but also be memorable and useful.

Whether you’re a parent or a cool aunt, we know you want to score brownie points, so we rounded up the best gifts for kids (think babies, toddlers, tweens, and teens!) that are sure to be used more than once or twice. If you’ve got a future chef, astronaut, physician or coding genius on your list, we’ve got you covered. Scroll on for the coolest toys and presents that are fun to buy, and even more fun to watch being unwrapped.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Spotify Wrapped 2019: How to Find Out Your Most-Played Songs of the Year

You’ve probably noticed your friends starting to share their top Spotify songs of 2019, along with their other streaming habits, courtesy of Spotify Wrapped. It is, after all, the time of year when your feed is inundated with “best of” lists, summing up the last 12 months of entertainment and culture. And with 2019, we also happen to be at the end of a decade, which means even more content.

These lists are certainly fun to read (and argue about), but what we love even more is looking back at our own lives over the course of the past year—or ten. So how are your friends finding these fun facts and graphics about their music stats?

There are a couple of ways to do it. and they both involve Spotify Wrapped. First, you can simply go to spotify.com/wrapped and log in to your account. You’ll be greeted with all your streaming trends from the past year and more. “This year, your Wrapped will include the songs, albums, artists, and podcasts you discovered throughout 2019, plus the artists you streamed the most throughout the decade on Spotify. It’s ‘Wrapped’ the way you love it—but with more nostalgia than ever before,” the company said in a release.

For the first time this year, you’ll also be able to access Wrapped via your Spotify app. Once there, you’ll discover your top artist, top song through each season, top podcasts, genres, and total minutes streamed in 2019. Plus the results are easily shareable to your social media feeds, including Instagram Stories, Facebook, Snapchat, and Twitter. You can also instantly add your most played songs to your library, if for some reason they’re not already there.

Perhaps the most shocking information will come via exactly how many minutes you’ve spent streaming Spotify in 2019—even if you want to keep that information to yourself.

Next up after #SpotifyWrapped in the year-end generator line will surely be the Instagram #TopNine, right?

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel Season 3 Details: Rachel Brosnahan and Alex Borstein Interviews

Rose Weissman (Marin Hinkle)

Where we left off: Abe Weissman announces that he’s going to resign from Columbia, which would mean that he and wife Rose will have to give up their lavish apartment (Columbia owns it). Can Rose talk some sense into her suddenly reactive husband?

Amazon Studios

What’s to come: Surprises, and lots of them. “The curveballs just kept coming,” Hinkle says. “Rose continues to be thrown and has to find a way to right the ship. She’s fierce, though. I never had any idea what her path would be [from episode to episode]. Although I want Rose to be comfortable, I love that everything is completely out of sorts for her.” It’s a sentiment that Sherman-Palladino echoes as well. “Rose is figuring out her new reality,” she says.

Amazon Studios

Sophie Lennon (Jane Lynch)

Where we left off: Sophie pleads with Susie to represent her and fight for her the same way she does for Midge. Will Susie accept? And will Sophie soften her attitude towards Midge?

What’s to come: Lynch is now a series regular, which means that you can expect to see a lot more of Sophie. Still, Lynch isn’t hopeful that Sophie will turn over a new leaf. “She won’t change at all,” she says with a laugh. “And although she wouldn’t admit it, she’s inspired by Midge. She’s abandoning Sophie from Queens for now and is going into a new realm. She wants to try her chops at acting and she wants to break out of where she was. But her insides are pretty much the same throughout the whole season.”

Amazon Studios

The third season of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel premieres Friday, December 6 on Amazon Prime.

Jessica Radloff is the* Glamour West Coast editor. You can follow her on Instagram here.

Your Horoscope for the Week of December 9, 2019

Midweek the moon waxes full in the sign of the chatty twins. Under loquacious Gemini, the feels flow in words while the sun exactly opposite in Sagittarius expands word count and the bigger picture. Journal if you’re not ready to reveal. Refresh copy on your bio, socials, or other comms that could do with some shameless spin from these cosmic wordsmiths. Open up to alternative means of data collection if the usual pathways are foggy. What’s hidden from your awareness that you’re not allowing yourself to see, feel, or otherwise understand? Intuitive Intel 101: “First thought is often the best thought” before you talk yourself down. Read on to discover what’s in store for your sign during the week of December 9 through to December 15, 2019, and double down by getting to know your rising sign.

Aries | Aries rising

Not everything can be understood with a rational approach, being broken down into logical facts, and not everything has some overarching symbolic meaning. Somewhere between these two points is another space, and that channel of information seems to be jamming up your well-ordered thought process. The more you resist it the more confused you’ll be. Combine all three sectors and you won’t need Google. We have access to all knowledge and nonordinary waking states. Dreams or just “knowing” is as valid as research found in a standard-edition textbook; it’s just harder to “prove.” Be open to the message behind the meaning, but don’t overdo it by searching for that meaning. Meanwhile, Mercury engages your mind in higher knowledge and tracking down flights for that much-needed vacay. Expand your experience, Aries.

Taurus | Taurus rising

Your money zone is getting all the attention this week as La Luna brings money matters to fruition. Set your intentions on the new moon to reveal what you’d like to see in terms of income, perhaps an opportunity for extra revenue or an investment opportunity. Even that perfect something you’ve been shopping for could be in the cards—if it’s anything to do with communication, it could be an investment, especially if it’s for work; make it a quality choice. A generous flow could come through a significant other; however, you’ll need to define what is yours and what is someone else’s. Mercury’s moving into your shared resources zone suggests an active bedside manner, and perhaps someone bringing you some useful information. If you’re emotionally investing in your “stuff” this week, make sure it doesn’t define or possess you.

All the Meghan Markle References in A Christmas Prince: The Royal Baby

They want their baby to have a “normal life.” “I went to public school. I played with neighborhood kids,” Amber tells Richard on a carriage ride, the implication being she wants their child to have the same. Richard agrees, though he says they’ll have to find a “new definition of ‘normal’.” This sounds a lot like the stance Markle and Prince Harry took on their child, who doesn’t have a royal title.

“When I think about Harry and the man I’ve written about—this is a man who, as a young boy, resented being a prince, resented the weighted burden that came with his title,” royals expert Katie Nicholl told Glamour earlier this year. “I think it’s very unlikely he’s going to want a title for his child. I think Lord or Lady is probably more than good enough for the Sussexes. I think more important than the title is the ability to raise a child with a rounded view of the world—with a normal childhood, as much as they can possibly give him or her.”

Penglia’s queen, named Ming, has a son. And guess what that son’s name is. Harry. It’s only mentioned once, and subtly, but we see what Netflix did there.

Netflix

Queen Amber considers hypobirthing for the delivery of her baby. Which Meghan Markle was reportedly considering, as well.

And she does yoga to stay relaxed while pregnant. The Duchess of Sussex is a famous yoga-doer. (Her mom, Doria Ragland, is an instructor.)

Queen Amber has a baby shower. As did Meghan Markle, even though it was against British royal tradition.

Prince Richard’s announcement of the birth. He’s the one who goes out and tells their extended family about Amber’s delivery, much like Prince Harry did with the press after Markle gave birth.

A Christmas Prince: The Royal Baby is now streaming on Netflix.

Christopher Rosa is the staff entertainment writer at Glamour. Follow him on Twitter @chrisrosa92.

Ghosting: The Spirit of Christmas Is Bizarre in the Best Way Possible

Warning: Light spoilers ahead.

The wildest, most delightful holiday movie you’ll watch this year isn’t on Hallmark or Netflix. No, that honor goes to Freeform’s Ghosting: The Spirit of Christmas, a left-of-center rom-com about both relationship ghosting and literal ghosts. (It premiered Wednesday night, December 4, on the network.) At one point, the literal ghost is the one doing the relationship ghosting.

The movie centers on Jess (The Bold Type‘s Aisha Dee), a single twenty-something who goes on a date with the very hot and charming Ben (Kendrick Sampson). They hit things off, exchange numbers, and cutely text on their respective drives home. But then Jess dies in a car crash, unbeknownst to Ben, who assumes she’s ghosting him. It turns out she’s now an actual ghost who can’t ascend to the afterlife. The key, she realizes, is to finish whatever unfinished business she has on Earth.

There are only two people who can see Jess as a ghost: Ben, of course, and her best friend, Kara (Kimiko Glenn), who helps her figure out what this said “unfinished business” is. At first, they think it’s finding true love with Ben, so he and Jess go on some dates. (Remember, she’s a ghost, so, to the outside world, it looks like he’s talking to himself.) Eventually, they have sex during the winter solstice because, for whatever reason, that’s the only time Ben can “feel” Jess like a human. Don’t ask me. This is a movie about ghosts.

But the boning doesn’t work: Jess still can’t ascend. It’s only after she gets in a fight with Kara that she realizes her true love isn’t with Ben: It’s with, well, Kara. This isn’t a romance, though: The takeaway from [Ghosting: The Spirit of Christmas is that worthwhile friendships, like the one Kara and Jess have, reign supreme over any relationship. Tender!

10 Movies You Didn’t Realize Were Based on Romance Novels

Romance is a billion-dollar industry. In 2016 these novels made up 23% of the overall fiction market, and they consistently out-perform all other genres. But while we’ve reclaimed the rom-com in film, these books are still often relegated to being “guilty pleasures” or considered “mommy porn.” This week we’re discussing these overlooked, often powerfully feminist books—that just so happen to have a happy ending.

Think back to some of the most romantic movies in recent memory. I’m sure a few titles come to mind: Me Before You, A Walk to Remember, Something Borrowed—the list goes on and on. And while these movies are different in terms of plot, they do have one commonality: They’re all actually based on romance novels. Yup: Before Shane West and Mandy Moore made you swoon in AWTR, their characters were just in the pages of Nicholas Sparks’ 2002 novel.

And there are more where these three came from. So many of your favorite rom-coms are actually based on these kind of books. The 10, below, are my personal favorites. Are they all traditional romance novels? No. But they all embody the core hallmarks of the genre: love, passion, and of course, sex.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Christopher Rosa is the staff entertainment writer at Glamour. Follow him on Twitter @chrisrosa92.