Beanie Feldstein, MJ Rodriguez, and Britney Young Are Redefining What It Means to Be Leading Ladies

Actors Beanie Feldstein, Britney Young, and MJ Rodriguez rocked the big and small screens this year in awe-inspiring ways. You probably recognize Feldstein best from the summer movie Booksmart. Meanwhile, Rodriguez brought tears to your eyes as Blanca on FX’s Pose. And Young has been killing it on GLOW for three seasons now.

These performances couldn’t be more different, but they’ve all had similar effects on viewers: We were captivated and transformed by them. Credit for that goes to Feldstein, Rodriguez, and Young, who have changed the landscape for women in Hollywood just by being themselves. They’ve each pushed the needle forward for representation in various ways—be it race, gender, sexual orientation, size. At Glamour’s Women of the Year Summit, these three women got together and talked about how they’re disrupting the system.

Growing up, Rodriguez, Feldstein, and Young didn’t really see themselves reflected on screen. “There wasn’t a lot of representation for young African American trans women,” Rodriguez told Vogue senior culture editor Estelle Tang, who was moderating their panel at the summit. “But I found comfort in watching shows like Will & Grace and Noah’s Arc. It made me feel included at a young age.”

Young, meanwhile, didn’t see good representation for either plus-size women or bi-racial people. “There were larger people on film and TV, but they were never shown in a positive light” she said. “They were always the bully, the prison guard. I never saw a nice plus-size girl who wasn’t being mean to people. [Bi-racial representation] was never shown in a positive light, as well.”

Feldstein had a similar experience growing up. People constantly told her she’d grow up to play Tracy Turnblad on Hairspray, but that role never interested in her. She wanted to be seen for all her complexities and nuances. , “[Tracy] is not who I am. I’m so many other things, let me show you all the other roles I can play,” she said. “Thank God things changed as I got older, and we have so much room for growth.”

We do have room for growth, but these three women are playing a huge part in moving things along. They’re using their positions of fame and power to impact the sets and projects they work on. Feldstein says she learned a lot from her Lady Bird co-star Saoirse Ronan on how to set the tone of a set. “Stepping into slightly bigger roles [like Monica Lewinsky in American Crime Story, her next project] at the center of a story, I think, ‘What would Saoirse do?’ To be the center of a story and hold that space is intimidating, but watching her do it was [inspirational].”

Beanie Feldstein, Britney Young, and MJ Rodriguez at Glamour‘s 2019 Women of the Year Summit.  

Getty Images 

Two Years After #MeToo, What’s Changed—And Who’s Changing It?

This month, the #MeToo movement turns two. In November 2017, twin Weinstein investigations in the New York Times and the New Yorker exposed pervasive sexual harassment in Hollywood. In the time since, #MeToo has become even more—a catchphrase, a caution, and a reminder that the work it set out to do isn’t done.

At Glamour‘s 2019 Women of the Year Summit in New York, CNN anchor Zain Asher sat down with three women on the front lines of the movement to take stock of it now—Carrie Goldberg, a Brooklyn-based attorney whose memoir Nobody’s Victim: Fighting Psychos, Stalkers, Pervs, and Trolls is available now, Tanya Selvaratnam, author of the upcoming book Assume Nothing: A Memoir of Intimate Violence, and Megan Twohey, the investigative reporter whose investigation into Harvey Weinstein at the New York Times with partner Jodi Kantor won a Pultizer, spawned a book (the transcendent She Said), and helped launch #MeToo in the first place.

The women discussed the #MeToo movement—how it came to be, how they each used their pain as a way to help ultimately empower others, and where to go from here.

For her first question, Zain Asher asked Meghan Twohey what her first question was to the women who were coming forward—whether she was interviewing A-list actors like Ashley Judd, Gwenyth Paltrow, or women like Laura Madden who had worked with Weinstein. Twohey, who had experience reporting on victims of sex crimes, said, “When asking women to open up about what was often the most painful experience in their lives…[I told them], ‘We can’t change what’s happened to you in the past. But if you work with us, and we’re able to publish the truth, we might be able to protect other people, and we might be able to turn your present pain into some sort of constructive public use.'”

Craig Barritt/Getty Images 

The sense that sharing your story, however painful, will ultimately make real change is what attorney Carrie Goldberg touched on next. Speaking to her own feeling of a lack of agency after experiencing harassment, she decided to start her own law firm representing victims who’ve suffered sexual abuse and harassment. Over the last five and a half years, her firm has helped hundreds of people “need orders of protection…or need to sue people like Harvey Weinstein.”

Two Years After #MeToo Went Viral, What’s Changed—And Who’s Changing It?

The sense that sharing your story, however painful, will ultimately make real change is what attorney Carrie Goldberg touched on next. Speaking to her own feeling of a lack of agency after experiencing harassment, she decided to start her own law firm representing victims who’ve suffered sexual abuse and harassment. Over the last five and a half years, her firm has helped hundreds of people who “need orders of protection…or need to sue people like Harvey Weinstein.”

Goldberg spoke about how she found strength in helping other women, despite “coming from a place of pain.” A similar sentiment was shared by author Tanya Selvaratnam, who said that the Summit was her first time telling her story in front of an audience. In regard to going public with abuse allegations against New York attorney general Eric Schneiderman, she said she felt “like I was damned if I did and damned if I didn’t”—but ultimately, she knew she needed to come forward.

Craig Barritt/Getty Images

Selvaratnam went on to say, “I don’t want to overstate my experience. There are millions of women who suffer violence so much greater than what I did. But I hope that my story helps others spot it.”

The conversation turned to where we go from here, with Asher stating, “The law does need to catch up with Me Too movements.” Goldberg says she still believes “in the civil justice system and the idea that if you’ve been injured—and sexual assault is an injury—then you should be able to take the offender for everything they’re worth.”

Selvaratnam shared that “a good part about my story came out in that New York now has its first African American and first female elected attorney general.” She added that she’s grateful for all the people who encourage everyone to keep fighting.

The #MeToo movement went viral with a tweet. For advocates and survivors, it can feel like there’s still a long way to go to make meaningful change—but as the women at the forefront discussed, societal change happens slowly, and it’s happening right now, with every conversation, and every discussion.

Find out more about Glamour‘s 2019 Women of the Year here.

Megan Phelps-Roper on Leaving the Westboro Baptist Church: ‘I Abandoned My Faith’

For this year’s Women of the Year issue, we asked inspiring womenpast honorees, athletes, and more—to reflect on their life and work. At our 2019 Women of the Year Summit, we asked speaker, activist, and author Megan Phelps-Roper to do the same.

Phelps-Roper grew up in the thick of a notorious religious group: her grandfather founded the Westboro Baptist Church, a congregation known for its fire-and-brimstone beliefs and antagonistic picketing lines. As a member church’s founding family, Phelps-Roper didn’t question the rhetoric her the parish espoused during her childhood. The Westboro Baptist Church was right, and everyone else was wrong.

Then, Phelps-Roper joined Twitter at 23 years old—and learned that the beliefs she’d grown up treating as facts were fiction. Onstage at the Glamour Women of the Year Summit, she talked about publicly leaving the Westboro Baptist Church with her sister Grace in 2012. Read her moving speech below.


My life’s unraveling took place on an ordinary, brilliant afternoon in July 2012. A Wednesday. I was painting the walls of a friend’s basement when it suddenly dawned on me: The world was right; my views were wrong. I remember thinking it strange that a mind—an entire world—could shift so drastically and so spontaneously.

But let me back up for a second.

I was born and raised in the Westboro Baptist Church, an infamous congregation started by my grandfather and consisting almost entirely of my extended family.

I’d been protesting gays since the age of five, preaching God’s hatred for sinners on picket lines across the country. In my teens, I joined my family on sidewalks outside of military funerals, spitting on American flags and exultantly singing praises to God for the homemade bombs that were killing service members in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Westboro’s fire-and-brimstone message was the air I breathed all my life. But after joining Twitter at the age of 23, I encountered people who challenged my beliefs and unearthed contradictions my blind faith had missed. Why did we call for the death penalty for gay people when Jesus said only sinless people should “cast stones”? How could we claim to love our neighbor while also praying for God to destroy them? Discussing and dissecting opposing viewpoints with others on Twitter opened up a whole new way of thinking for me. Twitter helped others see me as a human being, and showed me their humanity, too. It would even eventually introduce me to the man I would marry.

And so on that afternoon in 2012, dripping paintbrush in hand, I felt the last traces of my zeal for Westboro extinguish under a pile of mounting doubts. I had come to a series of terrifying conclusions: We were wrong. I had spent my entire life antagonizing vulnerable people for no good reason. I had to leave. I also realized that my refusal to continue as a member of the church would cost me my family, my community, my home, my job at my family’s law firm—everything that had ever been important in my life.

And though I was afraid, I also knew that—in the strangest way—Westboro brought me there. My family taught me to be honest, even when the truth was painful. They taught me to stand up for what I believe in, no matter what it would cost me.

And the church gave me the tools I needed to see hate—even my own—not as an obstacle but as an opportunity to advocate for the kind of empathy that builds bridges, heals divisions, and changes hearts and minds for the better.

Find out more about Glamour‘s 2019 Women of the Year summit and awards ceremony here.

Nasim Pedrad’s Best Quotes at the “Glamour” Women of the Year Summit

Comedian and actor Nasim Pedrad isn’t just a handmaiden to Princess Jasmine in Disney’s live-action remake of Aladdin—she’s also the emcee of Glamour’s 2019 Women of the Year Summit which took place at New York’s Alice Tulley Hall at Lincoln Center on Sunday, November 10. (You also probably remember her from her six seasons on Saturday Night Live). On top of hosting the day’s activities, Pedrad is also the creator, writer, and star of the forthcoming TBS series Chad, which was inspired by her own experience growing up in America as a child of Iranian immigrants. (She plays a 14-year-old boy.) And throughout the day, she had some wisdom to share on what it means to “Go Big.”

Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Glamour

Her best quotes, below.

“I wanted to play Middle Eastern characters— people—who were funny, nuanced, and flawed, and with flaws that were relatable. Characters that had humanity to them. But those parts didn’t really exist. Back then I found that so much of the representation of Middle Easterners in the media was predominantly negative. So since the roles I wanted weren’t available to me, I knew I had to ‘Go Big’ and create them myself. And that’s when I started writing.”

“I was determined and excited to be my own boss and create my own show.”

“When I first told the network I wanted to play a 14-year-old boy [in Chad], the idea was met with legitimate confusion and concern. ‘There’s no way we can make that show! What’s wrong with you! Like, Nasim, Why don’t you play the mom!’ In fairness, they had every reason to believe I’d pitch them a show where I’d play, you know, like an adult woman.

“But that’s not the show I wanted to make. I thought you could make a teen show so much funnier if the teenager was played by an adult who’s in on the joke who has that perspective of why teenagers are so funny. And I knew I could disappear into looking like a little dude…So I spent the next five years fighting for this show to see the light of day. Chad was my personal ‘Go Big’ moment. And by moment, I mean an excruciating half decade of challenges, set-backs, but ultimately perseverance.”

“I really wanted to write something that felt honest to my experience growing up in America as a child of immigrants.”

“Right now, I want you to take a second and think about a challenge you have in front of you where you could ‘Go Big.’”

“Raise your hand if you’ve ever had to help your parents with technology. Was it fun? Or did it result in the sudden death of your will to live?”

Find out more about Nasim Pedrad and Glamour’s 2019 Women of the Year here.

Nasim Pedrad’s Best Quotes at Glamour’s Women of the Year Summit

Comedian and actor Nasim Pedrad isn’t just a handmaiden to Princess Jasmine in Disney’s live-action remake of Aladdin—she’s also the emcee of Glamour‘s 2019 Women of the Year Summit which is taking place at New York’s Alice Tulley Hall at Lincoln Center. (You also probably remember her from her six seasons on Saturday Night Live). On top of hosting the day’s festivities, Pedrad is also the creator, writer, and star of the forthcoming TBS series Chad which was inspired by her own experience growing up in America as a child of Iranian immigrants. (She plays a 14-year-old boy.) And throughout the day, she had some wisdom to share on what it means to “Go Big”. Her best quotes, below.

“I wanted to play Middle Eastern characters— people—who were funny, nuanced, and flawed, and with flaws that were relatable. Characters that had humanity to them. But those parts didn’t really exist. Back then I found that so much of the representation of Middle Easterners in the media was predominantly negative. So since the roles I wanted weren’t available to me, I knew I had to ‘Go Big’ and create them myself. And that’s when I started writing.”

“When I first told the network I wanted to play a 14-year old boy [in my new TBS show, Chad], the idea was met with legitimate confusion and concern. [They said] ‘There’s no way we can make that show! What’s wrong with you! Like, Nasim, Why don’t you play the mom!’ In fairness, they had every reason to believe I’d pitch them a show where I’d play, you know, like an adult woman.”

“I was determined and excited to be my own boss and create my own show.”

“But that’s not the show I wanted to make. I thought you could make a teen show so much funnier if the teenager was played by an adult who’s in on the joke who has that perspective of why teenagers are so funny. And I knew I could disappear into looking like a little dude…So I spent the next five years fighting for this show to see the light of day. Chad was my personal ‘Go Big’ moment. And by moment, I mean an excruciating half decade of challenges, set-backs, but ultimately perseverance.”

“I really wanted to write something that felt honest to my experience growing up in America as a child of immigrants.”

“Right now, I want you to take a second and think about a challenge you have in front of you where you could ‘Go Big.’ “

Find out more about Nasim Pedrad and Glamour‘s 2019 Women of the Year here.

Glamour Women of the Year Summit 2019: All the Best Moments

For the past 29 years, Glamour’s Women of the Year Awards has honored game changers, rule breakers, and trailblazers. This year’s class of extraordinary winners is no exception. The accomplishments of these women are vast but they all share one thing in common: They’re not waiting for the world to become a better place—they’re making it one.

To kick off the celebration, Glamour is hosting our fourth annual Women of the Year Live Summit at Alice Tully Hall in New York City’s Lincoln Center—hosted by comedian Nasim Pedrad—which will be followed by our annual awards ceremony on Monday, November 11. Just a few things to expect from this year’s event? Conversations on #MeToo two years later with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Megan Twohey, an argument for embracing your inner asshole by Vanderpump Rules star Stassi Schroeder, and a no-holds-barred discussion with Busy Philipps and Jen Gotch on mental health.

The theme this year was Go Big to celebrate what all women do every day: make big choices, take big steps in their careers and personal lives, and push for big changes. So read on as we recap every Go Big moment and our panelists’ invaluable wisdom from the 2019 WOTY Summit.

Opening Remarks with Nasim Pedrad

The comedian, actor, and creator of the new TV series Chad kicked things off with an energetic speech about a moment in her life that she decided to Go Big. “When I started out fresh out of theatre school, as an Iranian American actress, casting directors had no idea what to do with me. They always referred to me as quote, ‘ethnically ambiguous,'” she said. “I wanted to play Middle Eastern characters who were funny, nuanced, and flawed. And with flaws that were relatable, that had humanity to them. So since the roles I wanted weren’t available to me, I knew I had to ‘Go Big’ and create them myself. That’s why I started writing.”

“I wrote a one-woman show called ‘Me, Myself and Iran’ that Tina Fey happened to see. Tina was really instrumental in helping me get my start,” Pedrad said. “From there I spent five seasons on Saturday Night Live. After my time at SNL, I was determined and excited to create my own show. I really wanted to write something that felt honest to my experience growing up in America as a child of immigrants. So with a fancy little development deal under my belt, I pitched a series where I would play a 14-year-old boy named Chad.”

11 TV Shows, Movies, and Music Moments for the Week of November 10, 2019

53rd Annual CMA Awards: Carrie Underwood hosts tonight’s show (with special guests Reba McEntire and Dolly Parton), which boasts the most nominations for Maren Morris. 8 P.M. ET on ABC

Thursday, November 14

Floribama Shore: Jersey Shore meets Southern Charm in this popular MTV series, which returns tonight for its third season. 8 P.M. ET on MTV

Friday, November 15

Charlie’s Angels: Ella Balinska, Kristen Stewart, and Naomi Scott are a new generation of crime-fighting Angels in this highly anticipated reboot. Elizabeth Banks, who directed the film, also stars as the all-seeing Bosley, and your internet boyfriend Noah Centineo has a role too. In theaters

Courage: Celine’s Dion’s new album is here, and it’s an eclectic mix of dance-pop and soulful ballads, all highlighting the icon’s superior vocal range.

THE WARRIOR QUEEN OF JHANSI: Per an official description from a press release, this movie “tells the true historical story of the Rani (translation: Queen) of Jhansi, a feminist icon in India and a fearless, freedom fighter – a real-life Wonder Woman who earned a reputation as the Joan of Arc of the East when in 1857 India, as a 24-year old General, she led her people into battle against the British Empire. Her insurrection shifted the balance of power in the region and set in motion the demise of the notorious British East India Company and the beginning of the British Raj under Queen Victoria.” In theaters

Dollface: Kat Dennings stars in and executive-produces this Hulu series about a young woman who, after a breakup, attempts to reacclimate herself with the girlfriends she left behind. Brenda Song and Shay Mitchell costar. Streaming on Hulu

Saturday, November 16

Double Holiday: Read Hallmark’s official description for this movie, below: 8 P.M. ET on Hallmark

“Career-minded Rebecca’s plans for Hanukkah go askew when a promotion opportunity comes up at work. When the company CEO asks Rebecca and her insufferable office mate, Chris—also her main competitor for the promotion—to plan the company’s Christmas party, she realizes they must overcome their opposing styles in order to succeed. Forced to work together on the holiday party, Chris learns more about Rebecca and her family’s Hanukkah traditions, while she also begins to see him in a new light. Although feelings slowly develop between the two, the ongoing competition over the promotion threatens to undermine it all. “

10 TV Shows, Movies, and Music Moments for the Week of November 10, 2019

53rd Annual CMA Awards: Carrie Underwood hosts tonight’s show (with special guests Reba McEntire and Dolly Parton), which boasts the most nominations for Maren Morris. 8 P.M. ET on ABC

Thursday, November 14

Floribama Shore: Jersey Shore meets Southern Charm in this popular MTV series, which returns tonight for its third season. 8 P.M. ET on MTV

Friday, November 15

Charlie’s Angels: Ella Balinska, Kristen Stewart, and Naomi Scott are a new generation of crime-fighting Angels in this highly anticipated reboot. Elizabeth Banks, who directed the film, also stars as the all-seeing Bosley, and your internet boyfriend Noah Centineo has a role too. In theaters

Courage: Celine’s Dion’s new album is here, and it’s an eclectic mix of dance-pop and soulful ballads, all highlighting the icon’s superior vocal range.

Dollface: Kat Dennings stars in and executive-produces this Hulu series about a young woman who, after a breakup, attempts to reacclimate herself with the girlfriends she left behind. Brenda Song and Shay Mitchell costar. Streaming on Hulu

Saturday, November 16

Double Holiday: Read Hallmark’s official description for this movie, below: 8 P.M. ET on Hallmark

“Career-minded Rebecca’s plans for Hanukkah go askew when a promotion opportunity comes up at work. When the company CEO asks Rebecca and her insufferable office mate, Chris—also her main competitor for the promotion—to plan the company’s Christmas party, she realizes they must overcome their opposing styles in order to succeed. Forced to work together on the holiday party, Chris learns more about Rebecca and her family’s Hanukkah traditions, while she also begins to see him in a new light. Although feelings slowly develop between the two, the ongoing competition over the promotion threatens to undermine it all. “

Travel Outfits: Photos of Celebrities at the Airport Are Here to Inspire Your Holiday Travel Style

Hey, reader! You might have noticed our new shopping tool—which lets us surface and suggest the best things to buy across the web—on this page. We’ve launched with two great retail partners: Gap and Walmart. Whether you’re on desktop or mobile, any Glamour story featuring a shopping bag icon means you’ll be able to instantly shop relevant, curated products. Check out the product picks to your left on desktop and right on mobile. Happy shopping!

With the money to pay for personal assistants, professional organizers, and full-time chefs and drivers, celebrities are oblivious to a lot of the annoying things you deal with on a day-to-day basis: packing lunches, having the oil changed, running out of toothpaste. But even the rich and famous aren’t spared the most annoying place in the world: the airport.

Some celebs move through the airport like we do: Let’s keep it comfortable and make it out of here without contracting anything viral. But other famous people, of course, treat LAX like every other public place: just another runway to strut down.

Here’s how four celebs do airports, in varying degrees of chic.

Victoria Beckham

Jackson Lee

The most posh, of course, is Posh herself, who made her way through JFK earlier this month. She mixed and matched three patterns—polka-dots, plaid, and argyle—and looked more pulled together than I have in all of 2019. Maybe it’s the wine-colored boots and bag or the supersize sunglasses that tied everything together; maybe she made a deal with the devil, who gave her style powers the rest of us just can’t comprehend.

Rihanna

Gotham