Bella Hadid Just Wore One of 2020’s Most Polarizing Trends

Twenty-twenty is going to be a big year. It’s the start of a new decade, after all. We can only imagine how many internet debates are to come in our future in every aspect of life from politics to what to make of Taylor Swift’s Miss Americana documentary on Netflix. But on the fashion end of the spectrum, we already know what one of the highly contested 2020 trends is going to be—and that’s low-rise pants.

Bella Hadid is one of the first celebrities to venture out in the low-rise style while attending the Louis Vuitton men’s fashion show this week in Paris. The model chose a matching midnight blue bra top and super slouchy trousers for the occasion, showing off just how low that rise can go.

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To be fair, had she opted for a blouse or tucked-in tee with the pants, you probably wouldn’t even notice the rise on the pants. But since she decided to show us the fullest expression of the style, the internet had a few thoughts.

This isn’t even the first time people have had notes on a Hadid low-rise look. “I love Bella Hadid but we’re gonna have problems if she keeps contributing to the comeback of low rise jeans,” one fan wrote on Twitter.

As someone who lived through the first major incarnation of low-rise jeans and pants, I have mixed feelings about the trend. But I’m not completely mad at it. As one our style writers debated when the look made its early resurgence on the runway last year, the new version of the low-rise jean “suggests that there’s a way to participate in the trend without wearing yours with 42 henleys or polo shirts—nor do your pants need to be too tight and too flared. These updated styles reflect a more relaxed approach: wider legs, looser fits, an invitation to dress denim up or down.”

Bring it on, 2020.

5 Fun, Different Ways to Wear Beanies—That All Work

On the flip side, you can draw attention to your colorful beanie by wearing nothing but neutrals—like Kristen Bell does here. For the ultimate effect, pick a vibrant color like purple or neon green and match it with clothing in shades of black, white, and grey. You paid for that beanie, after all. Let the world see it.

Match with a graphic shirt or sweater

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If you’re looking for that effortlessly cool vibe, this is it. Go with a black beanie and black graphic tee to emulate those scene kids you desperately wanted to befriend in 2006. Lucy Hale gets it.

Color, but keep it muted

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If neon green is too much, the pop of color still works in less-intense tones, like maroon and deep blue. And, honestly, shades like that are more in line with winter, anyway. If you prefer, save the “look at me” palette for summer and warm up with some, well, warmer colors for now. Please see: Reese Witherspoon on a recent outing with her dog.

And wild card: a beanie in the summer

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If Ashley Tisdale can do it then so can you, right? But really: a beanie can work in the summer. The trick to not burning up is going super light and airy with your clothes—a simple white T-shirt and shorts will do just fine.

Sex Education Season 2 Review: The Netflix Series Is Even Better

When Sex Education—Netflix’s highly binge-worthy comedy about, you guessed it, sex and relationships—premiered last year, it was such a hit that the streaming service says more than 40 million households watched it within the first four weeks. Naturally, a season two had to happen, and it finally premieres today, January 17. Yes, Sex Education is back for an eight-episode run that’s even funnier and more awkward than the last.

“There were a lot of elements for season one that we loved, but when we came into season two, we really tried to empower all the different departments across the show—from wardrobe to the script department—to be as bold as possible,” executive producer Jaime Campbell tells Glamour. “I think that’s reflected.”

Jean Milburn (Gillian Anderson)

Sam Taylor/Netflix

Campbell points to more air time for the adults as one way the show will be expanded this season. You’ll see more of Jean Milburn (Gillian Anderson) and her relationship with Jakob (Mikael Persbrandt), and Mr. and Mrs. Groff’s relationship (Alistair Petrie, Samantha Spiro) will “come under more scrutiny,” according to Campbell. That’s a good thing, the producer adds, because “in a show like this, you can often forget the adults and how incompetent they are. We’re really doubling down on their incompetence this season.”

It’s a development the younger cast is happy about, too. Patricia Allison, who plays Ola, Otis’s girlfriend, thinks it’s important to feature the sex lives of the parents. “I don’t think we get to see enough of that,” she says. “Older women who get to actually be like, ‘This is what I want.'” One example of how that plays out: Mrs. Groff, the headmaster’s wife and Adam’s mother, will start her own journey of self-discovery. “She’s in this kind of loveless marriage and feels like she doesn’t have a voice in it,” Allison says, “but then she forms a really lovely friendship with Jean and goes to a vagina workshop which allows her to explore her own sexuality.”

While we loved season one of Sex Education for shedding a light on topics that are usually glossed over on other shows (masturbation and the female orgasm, just to start), season two will go even further. “Our creator and writer, Laurie Nunn, came up with an explosive storyline that has two particular female characters intersect, and I think fans are going to absolutely love it,” Campbell says. As to which two characters Campbell is talking about, Netflix has that plot development on its do-not-spoil list, so mum’s the word for now.

How Do You Diet When You Have Kids?

When I stopped breastfeeding my son at 16 months, I suddenly became very aware of just how large my body seemed to be. It was spring, almost summer, and with the thought of swimsuit season looming, I decided that it was time to prioritize getting back in shape. I started slowly, tracking my food and steps each day and cutting out the late evening post-nursing snack I’d held on to even after I’d stopped breastfeeding.

As I began to lose weight, and my old clothes began to fit again, I felt happy and satisfied. As the number on the scale went down, my sense of worth as a woman went up. I wondered how much more weight I could lose.

As the summer rolled by and slowly turned to fall, I began to take my dieting more seriously. I cut out certain food groups, abandoning carbs and meat, and started logging two hours a day in the gym. By winter I had reached the weight I was in high school, well before my two babies had come along, and had purchased a whole new set of clothes to accommodate my shrinking body.

Every time I looked in the mirror, stepped on a scale, or went down a dress size, I got a hit of satisfaction. I felt accomplished despite the fact that my whole relationship with food and exercise was becoming increasingly strained and stressful—I made separate meals for my family and myself and skipped out on bedtime kisses for an evening workout each night. My happiness was perpetually tied to whether I’d stuck to my ‘limit’ of calories for the day.

The compliments were flooding in. Friends told me how great I looked, congratulating me on all the hard work I must be doing. Everyone noticed. Even my five-year-old son.

One morning, as I slid a fresh batch of pancakes, scrambled eggs, fruit and bacon onto the plates of my husband and two sons, my eldest asked me, “mommy, why don’t girls eat pancakes?” As I tried to puzzle together his question I realized that I was the only girl he saw eating breakfast each day and I was indeed guilty of skipping pancakes in favor of a small bowl of grapes. Just like everyone else, my son had noticed my dieting but it wasn’t my thinner thighs or smaller tummy that caught his attention, it was the fact that wasn’t eating full meals. “Lot’s of girls eat pancakes baby,” I responded, “I just don’t like them” I lied.

As soon as the words were out of my mouth, I felt guilty, not just for lying but for eating in a way that seemed so unnatural to my five-year-old—a kid I’d always encouraged to fill his plate with delicious and nutritious foods. I felt guilty for setting up a world in which it was normal for my son to see the woman he knows best saying no to healthy, good food, in pursuit of a smaller body. A world in which he might see women’s bodies as up as projects that needed to be constantly under construction. Later that week, after he’d asked me another tough question about why ladies only eat salads for dinner. It was devastating to hear my son make such disturbing generalizations about women and even more upsetting to know that my behaviors were the cause.

Research suggests that kids as young as three years old can begin to develop a dislike of their body. Given what was happening in my own kitchen, it’s not surprising. How was my diet impacting my son’s body image?

The tricky thing is figuring out how to do better. It’s impossible to unlearn all of the harmful messages about our bodies we’ve been internalizing for decades in one exchange. It’s impossible to fall in love with your body just the way it is over the course of one meal.

Sometimes, it even feels impossible to learn to practice what we preach to our kids. Danielle* a mom in Tennessee says that her six-year-old son has noticed that she constantly measures food to make sure that each serving size fits in with her diet plan. After asking her about it repeatedly, she still measures her food though she no longer does it in front of her kids. Mary F., a “lifelong dieter,” in North Carolina, also feels challenged by the idea of dieting while parenting. “Since I’ve had kids I’ve struggled to diet more because I’ve gotten heavier. But having a five-year-old daughter has made me think about how I talk about dieting,” she says, “I try to talk a lot more in terms of health and feeling good than achieving a certain number or a certain image.”

How to Clean Suede Shoes: 5 Tips to Making Them Look New Again

I’ve spent a large portion of my adult life wondering how to clean suede shoes properly. In the past, I’d keep about a dozen pairs in my closet, and instead of diligently taking care of them I would just…rotate, then buy new ones. And that’s not good for my bank account at all. Rather than continue buying more pairs of suede shoes, I knew I needed to figure out how to upkeep the ones I already own. After all, I know how to clean my shower and my closet and my inbox—so why should suede shoes be my impossible Everest?

I scoured the internet for tips on how to clean suede shoes and compiled the top five here. They’re fool-proof, trust me. My shoes have never looked better. And I guarantee yours will be sparkling in no time too.

Buy a suede brush

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Suede is sensitive material that’s best dealt with a tool specific to it. A suede brush comes with most suede kits, and buying one is the first step in getting your shoes to look like Beanie Feldstein‘s in the above photo.

Make sure your shoes are dry when cleaning

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No water! I know, that’s difficult to wrap your mind around when thinking about cleaning. But suede is actually very sensitive to H20, and not in a good way. Keep it far, far away when up-keeping your shoes. Brad Pitt (and his suede shoes) are counting on you.

Read the manufacturer’s label

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Because all suede is made differently, you have to handle it differently. So check the label before you do anything, and it will point you in the right direction. Are you listening, Hilary Duff?

Brush in the same direction when cleaning your shoes

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Not back and forth. Yes, it matters. Be gentle, not too vigorous. We’re dealing with suede here! Don’t you want your pumps looking like Jennifer Hudson‘s at the Cats premiere?

Use suede protective spray

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After you brush. This will prevent future stains. I wonder if Kristin Cavallari does this with her suede shoes.

The Women’s March 2020 Is This Weekend. Go, So You Don’t Have to Go Next Year.

In 2018, the marches were smaller, which was to be expected—it’s almost impossible to recreate a historic event.

In 2019, discord among the national leadership of the march and serious accusations of anti-Semitism against some of its leaders fractured and fizzled the momentum. (Since then, the original leadership has been almost completely replaced with a new board of directors.)

Millions of marchers in 2017 turned into hundreds of thousands in 2018 turned into tens of thousands in 2019. Now what? The relentlessness of bad news—and the feeling of our powerlessness in the face of it—is overwhelming. The world is burning and kids sicken and die in cages and women’s rights to health can be rescinded and wars can be started on social media. How do you even presume to respond to that?

“I think that there’s a lot of sense of people not necessarily knowing how to make their best contribution” says Rachel O’Leary Carmona, the new COO of the Women’s March. “There’s been a lot of efforts to distract women from building power, and a lot of distractions in the news—it’s very hard with a country going through an impeachment of the president, an international provocation that brought us to the brink of war, and in the midst of a presidential election,” she added. “But I think that’s why it’s more important than ever all those things are a demonstration of the abuses of power that Trump has engaged with.”

“How do I contribute?” is the first question that so many of us ask about our role in making the world feel less like one all-encompassing PortaPotty. After Trump’s election, thousands of people—and women in particular, if the outcome of the 2018 midterms is an indication—were spurred to participate in politics and political activism far outside their comfort zone, whether it embarrassed them or felt a little lame or not. Women surged into office. But for more of us, “How do I contribute?” is also the last question we ask before throwing up our hands.

The thing that the Women’s March did so well was give us an answer that made political engagement simple. In sending a national invite to join a clear action that required merely that people be able to move in one direction, it welcomed millions of people to the world of protest. The Women’s March allows people to participate in an act of organized political protest at little personal cost. To be a part of a march, show up. It’s quicker and easier than (but not a replacement for) voting. It’s a bridge between the isolation of reading the news and the much bigger ask of phone banking or donating. It’s not sufficient on its own, but it’s also the easiest possible first step.

The Women’s March also made people feel good. That’s partially why it’s treated with suspicion, as if having a good time means what you’re doing isn’t also serious. (Meanwhile, attendees at Trump rallies don’t seem to do a lot of hand wringing about mixing fun and politics.) Marching in 2017 made joining together in a massive action feel both consequential and joyous. Winning in 2020, not to mention the general project of making America more just and more livable, will require more from us than spending a few hours in the streets. Marching is often less like protesting or canvassing, and more like praying—it refocuses and centers you, it sharpens your resolve, it can form exceptionally strong bonds and build a sense of fellowship.

“The broader goal is to create a big tent for people to organize with community and build capacity and build relationships so that there’s an infrastructure for feminist organizing in 2020,” Carmona says. Marching isn’t a replacement for other forms of activism, it’s fuel for them. If marching isn’t your thing, there are plenty of alternatives, even more effective ways of influencing political and social change. But we shouldn’t dismiss the form of activism that welcomed millions of people to political involvement—or worst of all, feel embarrassed about it.

Don’t wait for 2021, for the fifth march, for another Trump administration. If you’d go next year, go this time too. Better to be there when we still have time to march, to donate, to register ourselves and others, and to vote. Better to feel a little dumb at an under-attended march, a little cold in the January weather, a little unsure if waving a sign around makes a difference. Ask the woman next to you—maybe she’ll have an idea.

Jenny Singer is a staff writer for Glamour.

Lili Reinhart Wants to End the Stigma Against Acne

What’s one beauty rule you think is B.S.?

I feel like “baking” your face with powder is kind of overrated. I think it’s just sort of adding product on your face that you don’t really need. I don’t like wearing a lot of product; I like keeping it very simple and clean. So I’ve never been a huge fan of layering on a bunch of powder. Less is more sometimes. No, most of time!

Fill in the blank: “I love my hair…”

Healthy. I use a lot of Olaplex, which strengthens your hair, in between highlighting sessions. I have to get my hair heat-styled for work every day. But for my CoverGirl shoot, we’re showing my natural waves. It’s nice to bring out the diffuser and let my natural hair texture come out rather than blowing it dry and straightening it out.

You travel constantly. What city or country gives you the greatest beauty inspiration?

When I’m in L.A., I feel like I have the most creative freedom to go crazy with makeup and try bold looks. I think it’s a really golden place for people to be very exploratory with their makeup.

You’re stranded on a desert island. What are the three products you bring with you?

I would bring lip balm because I have to have lip balm with me literally everywhere I go. I use one by Hanalei. It’s made in Hawaii. I would also bring a moisturizer that has sunscreen in it. And probably a cheek stain that I could also use as a lip stain, like CoverGirl Clean Fresh Cream Blush. I love creamy products that you can use wherever.

What colors are you loving on your nails right now?

I actually don’t get my nails done very often. I rarely have polish on them; usually just nail strengthener. When I do paint my nails, they’re usually a very nude pink. I think I would paint my nails more if I wasn’t on set so much and didn’t have to worry about continuity.

What’s your getting-ready music?

I really like Tame Impala. I listen to feel good and chill. I like to—how should I say this?—calmly jam out to music. That’s sort of the whole vibe of my life, calmly jamming out.

How much time do you spend getting ready?

I tend not to have a lot of patience when I’m getting ready. If I’m going to an event, I’ll probably start getting ready an hour before. But if I’m just going out for breakfast for the day, I can probably get ready in five minutes. I’m pretty quick.

Lili Reinhart Wants to End the Stigma Around Acne

What’s one beauty rule you think is BS?

I feel like “baking” your face with powder is kind of overrated. I think it’s just sort of adding product on your face that you don’t really need. I don’t like wearing a lot of product; I like keeping it very simple and clean. So, I’ve never been a huge fan of layering on a bunch of powder. Less is more sometimes. No, most of time!

Fill in the blank: “I love my hair…”

Healthy. I use a lot of Olaplex, which strengthens your hair in between highlighting sessions. I have to get my hair heat styled for work every day. But for my CoverGirl shoot, we’re showing my natural waves. It’s nice to bring out the diffuser and let my natural hair texture come out rather than blowing it dry and straightening it out.

You travel constantly. What city or country gives you the greatest beauty inspiration?

When I’m in L.A., I feel like I have the most creative freedom to go crazy with makeup and try bold looks. I think it’s a really golden place for people to be very exploratory with their makeup.

You’re stranded on a desert island. What are the three products you bring with you?

I would bring lip balm because I have to have lip balm with me literally everywhere I go. I use one by Hanalei. It’s made in Hawaii. I would also bring a moisturizer that has sunscreen in it. And probably a cheek stain that I could also use as a lip stain, like CoverGirl Clean Fresh Cream Blush. I love creamy products that you can use wherever.

What colors are you loving on your nails right now?

I actually don’t get my nails done very often. I rarely have polish on them; usually just nail strengthener. When I do paint my nails, they’re usually a very-nude pink. I think I would paint my nails more if I wasn’t on set so much and didn’t have to worry about continuity.

What’s your go-to getting ready music?

I really like Tame Impala. I listen to feel good and chill. I like to—how should I say this?—calmly jam out to music. That’s sort of the whole vibe of my life, calmly jamming out.

How much time do you spend getting ready?

I tend not to have a lot of patience when I’m getting ready. If I’m going to an event, I’ll probably start getting ready an hour before. But if I’m just going out for breakfast for the day, I can probably get ready in five minutes. I’m pretty quick.

The Circle Is More Than a Netflix Reality Show—It’s Challenging Fatphobia

Netflix’s new reality series The Circle is an undeniable hit, thanks to a premise that’s truly unlike any other show on TV. In it, contestants rate each other based on their profiles and interactions on a fake social network (called The Circle, naturally). But the wildest part is that the contestants’ profiles can be whatever they want—meaning a person can catfish other players. And in this week’s set of episodes, fans saw one catfishing contestant, Sean, face both support and backlash after revealing that she’d been using a friend’s photos on her profile.

Sean, a plus-size social media manager and self-proclaimed body acceptance advocate, shared her true personality, job, and hometown with the others in The Circle. The only difference: She used the photos of a straight-size friend. But after getting to know the other contestants, she eventually decided to share her real self with them.

Several were positive about Sean’s reveal, but two in particular, Shubham and Ed, were less than impressed. And they’re not alone—a quick Twitter search for “Sean The Circle” shows that many feel critical about her choice. “Sean using a catfish photo is such a shitty thing to do when she promotes body acceptance irl,” one user argued. “She had this huge platform to show HAES & continue promoting body acceptance. Instead, she decided to reinforce the idea that size & beauty is what matters most.”

But Ed, Shubham—and, I’m assuming, many of Sean’s critics on Twitter—don’t know what it’s like to go through life as a fat woman, and I think they’re missing the core point of what she’s doing. As Sean explained on the show, she didn’t use her friend’s pictures because she’s not confident. Rather, it was a strategy: She knows the harassment that simply existing while fat can bring, especially online. As a plus-size person myself, I was excited to see her reveal on-screen—and what she said about fat women being mistreated rang true. Sure, most of The Circle‘s contestants were supportive of Sean, but trolly, anonymous comments are what many plus-size women deal with on a daily basis on Instagram and Twitter. (Just ask Lizzo.)

Sean on Netflix’s The Circle.

Courtesy of Netflix

It’s not like the catfishers, Sean included, who made it to the final three episodes were pretending to be other people for fun. One, Seaburn, used his girlfriend’s photos because he wanted to show it was OK for men to express their emotions. Karyn says she chose to be Mercedeze because she didn’t want to be judged for her looks. And Sean connected with her fellow competitors without having to worry about potential snap judgments that could have come with using her real photos.

By using another woman’s photos, Sean challenged the show’s contestants—and viewers—to examine the unconscious biases society has toward plus-size women. Even The Circle players who responded to her reveal positively might be more cognizant of some of the challenges and harassment that plus-size people face every day after hearing Sean’s reasoning. What her critics are missing is that this isn’t a debate about whether or not Sean should just “be herself”—it’s a call to rethink internalized fatphobia entirely. And how often do we get that on a reality show?

Meghan De Maria is a writer and editor based in New York.

Here’s Why Kate Middleton Says She and Prince William Aren’t Having More Kids

Kate Middleton and Prince William have their hands pretty full with their three adorable kids, Louis, George, and Charlotte (who looks so much like Prince William that he recently confused her baby picture for his). Still, people have often wondered if they might expand their family at any point, and tabloids have certainly had fun encouraging the idea. But Middleton spoke to a few members of the public while visiting Bradford this week, and reportedly put the rumors to rest by saying she and Prince William aren’t thinking about more kids.

Sources say Kate Middleton made the comment to a fan who asked if she and Prince William planned on adding any members to the family. “I don’t think William wants any more,” Middleton said, according to Hello! That seemingly puts an end to all the speculation—for now, at least.

Victoria Jones/PA Images via Getty Images

Of course, Middleton has said a few things that have made people wonder if she might possibly have more babies on her mind. Last year, about a year after giving birth to Louis, she was out in Northern Ireland and crossed paths with a five-month-old baby, who she allegedly cooed over and admitted, “Makes me very broody.” She also joked, “I think William might be slightly worried.”

But feeling “broody” is one thing and full-on planning is another, and it seems like the Cambridges are committed to being a family of five . Plus, they have a ton going on, between a packed schedule of royal engagements and helping to figure out complications in the Sussex separation. (Prince William was reportedly part of a meeting that the Queen convened earlier this week.) And in between it all, Middleton has reportedly said she wants the kids to spend more time with Archie. Now, hopefully people will stop asking these two if they want more kids.