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12 Ingredients on the Insiders’ Fall Grocery List

12 Ingredients on the Insiders’ Fall Grocery List
Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto (all below)
Apples

“I appreciate that it can still be 70 degrees in the day and you can eat an apple, reminding you that cool weather is coming.”

12 Ingredients on the Insiders’ Fall Grocery List
Calabaza (Squash)

“I look forward to calabazas at this time of year to add to atole, a warm, creamy drink made with corn masa.”

12 Ingredients on the Insiders’ Fall Grocery List
Celtuce

“This leafy green vegetable is one of my favorite ingredients in fall and winter. We use the leaves to wrap and steam fish, and the stem is meaty and super versatile.”

12 Ingredients on the Insiders’ Fall Grocery List
Conch

“The Caribbean has a big culinary history of stews and one-pot meals. I like grilling the conch meat and adding it to a green-curry-base stew. That herbal brightness balances the flavor and picks up those salty sea notes.”

12 Ingredients on the Insiders’ Fall Grocery List
Fuyu Persimmons

“In springtime we have a lot of berries happening, and in the fall, persimmon is our way of having that sweet berry taste in dishes.”

12 Ingredients on the Insiders’ Fall Grocery List
Grapes

“When they’re not pure sweetness and have a bit of an acidic or tannic backbone, they’re really nice in savory food.”

12 Ingredients on the Insiders’ Fall Grocery List
Habanada Pepper

“This is a habanero bred to have all the flavor with none of the spice. It has incredible tropical tastes of passion fruit and pineapple. My favorite way to eat them is pickled. We recently put them in a beet salad with pluots and walnuts.”

12 Ingredients on the Insiders’ Fall Grocery List
Mushroom Powder

“It’s like adding a natural MSG, bringing a boost of umami to stocks, soups, burgers or, really, anything.”

12 Ingredients on the Insiders’ Fall Grocery List
Pomegranate

“The fruit is so versatile, it can bring a lot of things to life. That tartness and sweet-savory balance are integral to Middle Eastern cooking.”

12 Ingredients on the Insiders’ Fall Grocery List
Radicchio

“For standing up to stronger flavors and introducing something fresh to a heavier dish, radicchio is really great.”

12 Ingredients on the Insiders’ Fall Grocery List
Red Fermented Tofu

“There are layers of nuttiness and earthiness that take to dishes that are a little heartier, like a pork roast. It’s also the base for our fall bitter melon soup.”

12 Ingredients on the Insiders’ Fall Grocery List
Wild Mushrooms

“This season has been rainy, perfect for wild mushrooms. We’ve been seeing beautiful maitakes and matsutakes, and turning them into stock, blending them into purées and braising them.”

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If Only Airline Tickets Were Like Sports Tickets

Is a seat in the grandstands at a golf tournament similar to a seat on an airplane? Airlines want consumers to think so, but they add many restrictions to their tickets.
Is a seat in the grandstands at a golf tournament similar to a seat on an airplane? Airlines want consumers to think so, but they add many restrictions to their tickets. Photo: Andrew Redington/Getty Images

Airline executives love to equate their tickets to concert or sports tickets.

“When you go to a concert, if you have a better seat, you expect to pay more,” United Airlines President Scott Kirby said in an interview explaining new fees to reserve seat assignments.

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It’s an outlandish comparison, really, and a cover for restrictions on customers that would never fly in other industries. Sure, location matters and refunds aren’t allowed once you buy a ticket to a ballet performance or football game, just like they aren’t allowed for all but the most expensive commercial flights. But the similarities end there.

Unlike those events, airline tickets can’t be resold or given to someone else if you can’t use the ticket. Changes bring a $200 penalty. Event tickets have a price printed on them. The price of an airline seat varies wildly and fluctuates by the minute. And you don’t really buy a specific seat with an airline—you can be bumped or moved if the airline wants to.

Imagine showing up at a World Series game at Fenway Park and having the usher tell you the Red Sox gave your seat to someone else.

This faulty comparison airlines often make raises a fundamental question: What exactly is an airline ticket? You’re not buying a seat, you’re buying transportation—a contract to get you from one city to another as the airline wants. And the “ticket” comes with pages and pages of rules that work in the airline’s favor.

The most pernicious of those rules is the change fee, which airline executives admit isn’t to cover the minimal cost of altering a reservation but to discourage business travelers from buying cheap tickets and switching flights to fit their changing schedules. Same with restrictions on reselling tickets and changing names. They’re all to force corporate customers into higher fares.

The inflexibility has long grated on travelers, and leaves many wondering why airlines penalize their customers so aggressively.

“I can’t think of another business that charges for something that doesn’t seem to have value or seem to have a reason associated with it,” Jon Battle, a Dallas retiree, says of change fees. “Changing within the same airline? They’re still getting the business.”

Some ticket rules have loosened over time, airlines note, such as requirements for Saturday-night stays or round-trip ticket purchases. But others have grown into expensive consumer issues.

Reservation cancellation and change fees totaled $2.8 billion for U.S. airlines in the 12 months ending June 30, according to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics. They make up a big chunk of airline profits.

There have been a few recent efforts to make tickets more consumer-friendly, particularly with change fees, with little success so far.

Is That the Ticket?

How airline tickets are different from a ticket to the World Series:

  • You can’t resell an airline ticket.
  • You can’t give it to a friend.
  • You could get moved to a worse seat.
  • You could get bumped off the flight.
  • Preflight safety briefing instead of national anthem.
  • It’s usually much less fun.

A recent proposal in Congress to have the Transportation Department assess whether airline change fees are reasonable and proportionate to the service provided was removed from the final version of the Federal Aviation Administration reauthorization. Airlines lobbied against any possible limits, with American Airlines chief executive Doug Parker saying he’d eliminate any nonrefundable ticket changes if change fees were restricted.

“We, like the baseball team, like the opera, would say, ‘We’re sorry, it was nonrefundable,’ ” Parker said in September, according to the Associated Press. Yet unlike the baseball team or opera, the airline wouldn’t let you resell or give away a ticket.

One move that has stuck: Frontier Airlines slashed its $99 change fee last month. Now if you make a change 90 days or more before departure, Frontier won’t charge a change fee, but will collect any fare difference. Up to two weeks before departure a change costs an extra $49. Inside two weeks before departure, the fee remains at $99, plus fare differences.

United’s Mr. Kirby made his concert comparison when discussing new fees to reserve plain coach seats—with no extra legroom—that happen to be closer to the front of the plane. United announced in August it would start charging the fees for “preferred” seats by the end of the year. Other airlines, including American and Delta, do the same. Somehow being closer to the cockpit is, in airline thinking, like being in the orchestra section.

About all it really means is you deplane a couple of minutes earlier. The fees, on the other hand, force travelers, including families, to pay to reserve seats in advance. Fewer seats can be reserved for free. If you want seats together, you increasingly must pay fees.

Mr. Kirby acknowledges concerts aren’t a perfect analogy.

He says airlines need the rules and restrictions to separate leisure passengers, who are more price-sensitive and pay less, from business travelers, who are willing to pay more for seats booked closer to departure.

“For us, the same seat is a different product because of the flexibility inherent in being able to use that seat,” he says.

Were airlines to set a fixed price for seats and sell out the flight, the price for leisure customers would be about double, Mr. Kirby says.

“Everyone is better off with the structure we have in place,” he says.

If airlines allowed name changes on tickets, or let people sell or give tickets away like event tickets, speculators would buy up flights and push the cost higher. Online travel agencies might make a market in popular flights, or ticket-selling services like StubHub might get into the airline business.

“The policies are designed to effectively preserve the integrity of the pricing structure,” Mr. Kirby says. “The rationale for change fees is to keep those two things as distinct demand pools.”

With name changes, by the way, there is no security issue: TSA only wants the names of people on a flight hours before departure to be vetted against government databases. Name changes are allowed on group reservations at many airlines.

Southwest is the lone U.S. airline that doesn’t charge change fees and thinks it benefits with higher revenue by making life a little easier for travelers. Andrew Watterson, Southwest’s chief revenue officer, says passengers changing plans isn’t a problem as long as they realize they’re buying a new flight at a new price.

Adding a $200 change fee on top of a new fare, he suggests, is “gouging someone in their moment of need.”

Mr. Watterson contends ticket penalties are a relic of a bygone era when airlines couldn’t predict demand for each flight as accurately. Today, airlines have highly accurate flight-by-flight forecasts.

“Why should you penalize the customer,” he asks, “because we, as management, are doing a poor job?”

MORE FROM THE MIDDLE SEAT

Write to Scott McCartney at middleseat@wsj.com

I Was an Extra in the Biggest Scene in ‘A Star Is Born’—and Here’s What Happened

Courtney Conquers has been a Lady Gaga fan for 10 years—even before “Just Dance” was released—and like any dedicated Little Monster, she jumps at the chance to see her Mother in the flesh. “It’s been a decade of fangirling and networking and being crazy but not too crazy,” she tells Glamour.com. “So every once in a while, I get emails or links for opportunities.” Earlier this year, for example, she attended a taping of the Recording Academy’s Elton John tribute, at which Gaga performed “Your Song.”

Another opportunity arose in late April 2017, when Conquers and her friend Jamie (also a Gaga fan) got word that tickets to A Star Is Born filming event in L.A. were available. (Proceeds went to Gaga’s Born This Way Foundation.) In a matter of days, Conquers found herself witnessing the making of the movie’s most pivotal scene: when Jackson Maine (Bradley Cooper) pulls Ally (Gaga) onstage to sing “Shallow” for the first time. Here the 29-year-old Toronto native tells her story.


I run a blog called the Drag Coven with my best friend, Jamie, and we were on our way to L.A. for RuPaul’s Drag Con when a mutual friend sent us a link and was like, “Hey, I don’t know when you’re gonna be in L.A., but you guys should do it.” It was a sign-up link where, for $12 a day, you could go for two days and be in a scene of A Star Is Born.

We panicked because we were actually going to be in L.A. those days, but we had approximately T-minus 45 seconds to get the tickets for both of us—Gaga sells out like that, no matter what—and we were [on an airplane] about to take off. But we got them.

We didn’t know in what capacity we’d be involved, or where we’d stand, so we just went in the morning and got in line. We’re used to this—we’re those intense fans. The first thing they did when we walked in was make everybody put their cell phones in a locking pad. Then they filed us in, the appropriate number of people for each row. The people who got there first were closer to the front.

They [also] sectioned off a place at the front to put people who were there for fun but who kind of knew how this worked, who could hold their own. They wanted them to have followed the dress code. We were supposed to dress like we were going to a country-rock summer music festival. We were told specifically not to wear anything Lady Gaga–related, which I’d say at least a quarter of the people didn’t listen to and had to turn their shirts inside out.

“[After the filming] friends would be like, ‘I’m so excited. Can you hum the song for me?’ I’d say, ‘Actually, I can’t.'”

There was a warm-up host playing Lady Gaga trivia with the crowd [to compete for spots in the special section]. Jamie and I met up with a group of about seven [Gaga fans] we knew and got the questions right. So we ended up bumping [even closer] to the front. I doubt you’ll see us, but we were right there.

There were several hours where I definitely saw why they needed us there, but we weren’t active. Earlier in the day they had to do setups and practices with body doubles and stand-ins. They had to get the lights right.

We were there long enough that they made sure we had a meal. They gave us vouchers, which was good, because [the options were] very overpriced concert-venue foods. We all got hot dogs, a bag of chips, and a drink. But people got tired and squirrelly. There was one lady who was being particularly rude, shouting out of turn when set people were trying to concentrate. I ended up just taking her hot dog and eating it. She had it sitting under her seat, so I said, “You know what? She’s not eating that, and she’s really bugging me.” She didn’t even notice. It’s survival!

PHOTO: Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

Before Gaga came out, they were hyping us up by getting the crowd to sing Gaga songs. But then they were like, “OK, maybe getting you to sing Gaga songs was a mistake. What we really need from you is to pretend this is not Lady Gaga. You do not know this person. She is not the pop star you know and love. This is just some girl; you’re curious but not that enthused. Do not shout things. Do not go wild. Lady Gaga does not exist in this universe.”

We saw Gaga and Bradley do their scene probably about 18 times [over the course of both days]. They had internal mikes, but they turned the big amplifying mikes off; it wasn’t a full-on concert. People [outside the venue] were sending drones in trying to record the music—the crew caught them and explained, “We actually need you to be quite quiet, because we have to play the music so the people onstage can hear it, but soft enough that these drones won’t pick it up. You’re probably not going to hear anything.” [After the filming] friends would be like, “I’m so excited. Can you hum the song for me?” I’d say, “Actually, I can’t.”

“I slammed face-first into an absolute tree of a human being—it was Bradley Cooper!”

On the end of the first day, I went to the bathroom and whipped around the corner really fast; I slammed face-first into an absolute tree of a human being—it was Bradley Cooper! He almost knocked me on my butt. He was very tall, which I didn’t realize. (I was there for Gaga; I’m not an obsessive Bradley Cooper fan.) I was taken aback and was just like, “Oh, sorry.” And he went, “Oh, sorry.” And I said, “No, I’m sorry.” We kind of got in this sorry war, which was funny. He went, “Thank you for being there. How’s it going? Are you having fun?” And I said, “Yeah, it’s really good. I’m excited to be here.” He was like, “Oh, great, thank you.” And I went, “No, thank you.” And he went, “No, thank you.” He started laughing, and I got flustered and mumbled, “OK, I have to pee now.” I ran off, so embarrassed. He was very nice.

The second day they took us up into the higher stands to shoot again. (We’d only paid $12 for the first day, but they basically said, “Anyone who’s here today can come back tomorrow if they want to.”) You don’t end up seeing Jamie and me in the movie then, either, because there’s a flash of a spotlight [when Gaga walks past us in the scene]. It was cool because they did a couple takes and she walked by us over and over and over again. At one point she was standing, waiting for the take to start, and she kind of looked up and Jamie and I went, “Hey, girl.” She’s known Jamie longer, so she definitely recognized Jamie. I haven’t seen Gaga in a couple years, and I got a radical haircut since then, so she gave me this look. I saw both confusion and recognition. It was a very quick interaction, but very cute.

[Near the end of the second day] I remember them saying, “If you absolutely have to go, exit to the left and we’ll unlock your cell phones. If you can stay, please do.” They were checking that they got everything they needed and everybody was milling around waiting; there was downtime on set. So we stayed, and Gaga went to the piano and started tinkering around. Then she suddenly started singing her own music—she just did a mini concert out of nowhere. Jamie and I, being the adoring fans we are, immediately said, “Screw the seat I’m sitting in,” and hopped to the front of the stage. She did “You and I” and “Edge of Glory” and a little bit of “Born This Way.” Bradley Cooper came out and sat on one of the speakers and was smiling at all of us; he clearly enjoyed seeing her entertaining us. It was very sweet and the smallest little Gaga concert I’d ever been to.

Then they said, “All right, that’s a wrap.” We all cheered, and Gaga and Bradley each got on the mike and said, “Thank you so much for being here.” [The crew] unlocked our cell phones, and that was it.

When we saw the scene onscreen it was very weird. It was cool seeing it up there when we’d been there to see the inner workings. We were also seeing this woman, whose career has greatly influenced us, on the big screen in a new capacity. She was so good. She was even better than I thought she was going to be.

Related: The True Story Behind A Star Is Born‘s Final Scene Will Make You Cry All Over Again

I Was an Extra in A Star Is Born’s Biggest Scene—and Here’s What Happened

Courtney Conquers has been a Lady Gaga fan for ten years—even before “Just Dance” was released—and like any dedicated Little Monster, she jumps at the chance to see her Mother in the flesh. “It’s been a decade of fangirling and networking and being crazy but not too crazy,” she tells Glamour.com. “So every once in a while, I get emails or links for opportunities.” Earlier this year, for example, she attended a taping of the Recording Academy’s Elton John tribute, at which Gaga performed “Your Song.”

Another opportunity arose in late April 2017, when Conquers and her friend Jamie (also a Gaga fan) got word that tickets to A Star Is Born filming event in L.A. were available. (Proceeds went to Gaga’s Born This Way Foundation.) In a matter of days, Conquers found herself witnessing the making of the movie’s most pivotal scene: when Jackson Maine (Bradley Cooper) pulls Ally (Gaga) on stage to sing “Shallow” for the first time. Here, the 29-year-old Toronto native tells her story.


I run a blog called the Drag Coven with my best friend, Jamie, and we were on our way to L.A. for RuPaul’s Drag Con when a mutual friend sent us a link and was like, “Hey, I don’t know when you’re gonna be in L.A., but you guys should do it.” It was a sign-up link where, for $12 a day, you could go for two days and be in a scene of A Star Is Born.

We panicked because we were actually going to be in L.A. those days, but we had approximately t-minus 45 seconds to get the tickets for both of us—Gaga sells out like that, no matter what—and we were [on an airplane] about to take off. But we got them.

We didn’t know in what capacity we’d be involved, or where we’d stand, so we just went in the morning and got in line. We’re used to this—we’re those intense fans. The first thing they did when we walked in was make everybody put their cell phones in a locking pad. Then they filed us in, the appropriate number of people for each row. The people who got there first were closer to the front.

They [also] sectioned off a place at the front to put people who were there for fun but who kind of knew how this worked, who could hold their own. They wanted them to have followed the dress code. We were supposed to dress like we were going to a country-rock summer music festival. We were told specifically not to wear anything Lady-Gaga-related, which I’d say at least a quarter of the people didn’t listen to and had to turn their shirts inside out.

[After the filming] friends would be like, “I’m so excited. Can you hum the song for me?” I’d say, “Actually, I can’t.”

There was a warm-up host playing Lady Gaga trivia with the crowd [to compete for spots in the special section]. Jamie and I met up with a group of about seven [Gaga fans] we knew and got the questions right. So we ended up bumping [even closer] to the front. I doubt you’ll see us, but we were right there.

There were several hours where I definitely saw why they needed us there, but we weren’t active. Earlier in the day, they had to do setups and practices with body-doubles and stand-ins. They had to get the lights right.

We were there long enough that they made sure we had a meal. They gave us vouchers, which was good, because [the options were] very overpriced concert-venue foods. We all got hot dogs, a bag of chips, and a drink. But people got tired and squirrel-y. There was one lady who was being particularly rude, shouting out of turn when set people were trying to concentrate. I ended up just taking her hot dog and eating it. She had it sitting under her seat, so I said, “You know what? She’s not eating that, and she’s really bugging me.” She didn’t even notice. It’s survival!

PHOTO: Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

Before Gaga came out, they were hyping us up by getting the crowd to sing Gaga songs. But then they were like, “OK, maybe getting you to sing Gaga songs was a mistake. What we really need from you is to pretend this is not Lady Gaga. You do not know this person. She is not the pop star you know and love. This is just some girl; you’re curious but not that enthused. Do not shout things. Do not go wild. Lady Gaga does not exist in this universe.”

We saw Gaga and Bradley do their scene probably about 18 times [over the course of both days]. They had internal mikes, but they turned the big amplifying mikes off; it wasn’t a full-on concert. People [outside the venue] were sending drones in trying to record the music—the crew caught them and explained, “We actually need you to be quite quiet, because we have to play the music so the people on stage can hear it, but soft enough that these drones won’t pick it up. You’re probably not going to hear anything.” [After the filming] friends would be like, “I’m so excited. Can you hum the song for me?” I’d say, “Actually, I can’t.”

I slammed face-first into an absolute tree of a human being—it was Bradley Cooper!

On the end of the first day, I went to the bathroom and whipped around the corner really fast; I slammed face-first into an absolute tree of a human being—it was Bradley Cooper! He almost knocked me on my butt. He was very tall, which I didn’t realize. (I was there for Gaga; I’m not an obsessive Bradley Cooper fan.) I was taken aback and was just like, “Oh, sorry.” And he went, “Oh, sorry.” And I said, “No, I’m sorry.” We kind of got in this sorry war, which was funny. He went, “Thank you for being there. How’s it going? Are you having fun?” And I said, “Yeah, it’s really good. I’m excited to be here.” He was like, “Oh, great, thank you.” And I went, “No, thank you.” And he went, “No, thank you.” He started laughing, and I got flustered and mumbled, “OK, I have to pee now.” I ran off, so embarrassed. He was very nice.

The second day, they took us up into the higher stands to shoot again. (We’d only paid $12 for the first day, but they basically said, “Anyone who’s here today can come back tomorrow if they want to.”) You don’t end up seeing Jamie and me in the movie then, either, because there’s a flash of a spotlight [when Gaga walks past us in the scene]. It was cool because they did a couple takes and she walked by us over and over and over again. At one point she was standing, waiting for the take to start, and she kind of looked up and Jamie and I went, “Hey girl.” She’s known Jamie longer, so she definitely recognized Jamie. I haven’t seen Gaga in a couple years, and I got a radical haircut since then, so she gave me this look. I saw both confusion and recognition. It was a very quick interaction, but very cute.

[Near the end of the second day] I remember them saying, “If you absolutely have to go, exit to the left and we’ll unlock your cell phones. If you can stay, please do.” They were checking that they got everything they needed and everybody was milling around waiting; there was downtime on set. So we stayed, and Gaga went to the piano and started tinkering around. Then she suddenly started singing her own music—she just did a mini concert out of nowhere. Jamie and I, being the adoring fans we are, immediately said, “Screw the seat I’m sitting in,” and hopped to the front of the stage. She did “You and I” and “Edge of Glory” and a little bit of “Born This Way.” Bradley Cooper came out and sat on one of the speakers and was smiling at all of us; he clearly enjoyed seeing her entertaining us. It was very sweet and the smallest little Gaga concert I’d ever been to.

Then they said, “All right, that’s a wrap.” We all cheered, and Gaga and Bradley each got on the mike and said, “Thank you so much for being here.” [The crew] unlocked our cell phones, and that was it.

When we saw the scene on screen it was very weird. It was cool seeing it up there when we’d been there to see the inner workings. We were also seeing this woman, whose career has greatly influenced us, on the big screen in a new capacity. She was so good. She was even better than I thought she was going to be.

Related: The True Story Behind A Star Is Born‘s Final Scene Will Make You Cry All Over Again

The Easy Mascara Trick That Makes My Lashes Look a Million Times Better

Celebrity beauty tricks are a dime a dozen, but the ones that actually work are rare. Like, let’s be real: Most celebrities look great because they have a team of dedicated professionals paid to help them look that way. Power to them, but it means I take all celebrity advice, and routines, with a grain of salt. You never know—maybe a model does drink eight glasses of water a day, but she also dips in for a Clear + Brilliant laser treatment every six months. There’s only one celebrity beauty trick that I swear by, and it came from Dakota Johnson’s grandmother, Tippi Hedren.

That’s right. When Glamour interviewed Johnson last year, she dropped one tidbit of knowledge that I’ve been following religiously ever since. Apparently, Dakota was applying mascara one day when Tippi stepped in and set her straight. “She [actress Tippi Hedren] was watching me put my mascara on once, and told me that if you hold the mirror down low and put the mascara on while looking downward, you will get the most coverage from the base of the lashes to the tips. And, of course, she’s right! She’s a fucking movie star; she’s a legend!”

It wasn’t until a friend recently commented that I rarely get dark smudges on the top of my lids anymore (which is regular life when you have deep-set eyes) that it even occurred to me to share how much of a game-changer this trick is. Now, instead of applying mascara straight-on, brushing my lashes up and inevitably walking away with dark black marks, I use the Tippi technique. I take a hand mirror and hold it beneath my chin, then brush mascara onto my lashes while looking down into the mirror. It might sound a little basic, but it’s revolutionary.

The position makes it 10 times easier to comb the mascara wand through your lashes, since you’re looking down, and your visibility doesn’t change as you brush the mascara on (like it does when you’re looking straight into the mirror and the wand’s right in front of your eye). It even lets me wiggle the wand into the base of my lashes, as I’ve heard makeup artists instruct for so many years. If I’d tried to “wiggle the wand into the base of my lashes” from my old, straight-on position, it’d be a smudgy disaster. Now it’s a quick and easy maneuver that gives me huge lashes.

Prepare to never go back to your old ways after you try it. I sure haven’t.

Related Stories:
The 10 Best Mascaras for People With Sensitive Eyes
This One Second Trick Makes My Eyebrow Makeup Look Entirely Natural
This Easy Trick Makes My Foundation Last for Hours

How Shameless’ Midseason Finale Sets Up Emmy Rossum’s Final Episodes

Shameless is paving the way for the beginning of the end for Emmy Rossum’s Fiona. The second half of the Showtime dramedy’s ninth season will mark Rossum’s last. So, is the show setting Fiona up for a happy ending of some sort? When asked if there is still hope for her to have one, Shameless‘ executive producer John Wells said:

From the sound of things, Fiona may get a happy ending. Just not in the traditional “happily ever after” way. John Wells’ answer to TVLine is hopeful while drawing on viewers’ anticipation. Based on his response, there should be a sense of closure on Fiona’s journey. The thing is, Shameless fans may be in for quite the ride as she gets there.

Nothing comes easy for the characters on the Showtime dramedy. So, Fiona’s final chapter will be no different. Having spiraled towards the end of Season 9’s first half, it seemed things could not get any worse. Well, John Wells went on to tease a farther fall for Fiona as Season 9 progresses, saying:

Having devoted her life to bringing up her siblings, Fiona is now facing a bit of empty-nest-style emotions. They do not need her in the way they once did. Having never experienced an adult life without taking care of her siblings, she will need to define herself as an individual.

It should be the beginning of an intriguing journey for Fiona. As of the midseason finale, her life is in shambles. Whether she can put herself on a path to happiness in seven episodes will be interesting to learn.

Emmy Rossum announced her upcoming exit ahead of the premiere of the first half of Season 9. So, fans have had time to brace themselves. Shameless has undergone some significant changes, as Season 9 heralds a new chapter for the long-running series. Having already said goodbye to Cameron Monaghan’s Ian, the show is preparing to bid farewell to its co-lead.

Given that the show was able to give Ian a bittersweet ending, there is reason to hope they can do the same for Fiona. While he ended up going to prison, he was reunited with his ex, Mickey. The two ended up being cellmates, and in an uplifting move, they got back together.

For her part, Fiona was not able to see Ian off due to a car accident. It is moments like that which marked low points for Fiona throughout the first half of Season 9. Whether she can end up surfacing in time to find happiness will probably remain a mystery until the very end.

Seven episodes seem like they could be more than enough time to make it happen. Find out if it does! The second half of Shameless Season 9, a.k.a. Emmy Rossum’s last, will premiere January 20, 2019, on Showtime. While you wait for the dramedy’s return, there is no shortage of content arriving over fall.

The Halloween 1978 Honest Trailer Delves Into The Movie’s Slasher Clichés

The new Halloween made a major mark at the box office this past weekend, setting a franchise record and becoming one of the best October openings ever. With that film now in theaters, it seems an appropriate time to revisit John Carpenter’s 1978 Halloween, and what better way to do so (short of watching the actual film) than with the latest Honest Trailer. Check out the Honest Trailer for the 1978 Halloween below to see all the slasher clichés packed into the horror classic.

Watching this, you really get reminded of just how many of what we now consider to be slasher clichés this film had in it. The hook-ups, the masked killer with a hatred for suburban teenagers who makes creepy phone calls and the virginal survivor were all in the original Halloween. And the cliché of a killer or any sort of mysterious figure disappearing right before you try and draw attention to him goes beyond the slasher genre and exists across film.

Of course, as the Screen Junkies’ Honest Trailer notes, Halloween was the film that invented some of these clichés, while it cemented others. Given how influential Halloween was and still is, it acted as a blueprint for the slasher films that followed. Watching it for the first time now though, you could be forgiven for finding it derivative with all of the well-worn clichés it employs.

That’s part of what makes the new film so fun though, as it is aware of the clichés that its predecessor created and attempts to subvert some of these.

One of the funniest parts about this Honest Trailer is how it highlights the confusing nature of the franchise’s continuity and titling. The new film is the sequel to the original Halloween, making it the third Halloween II, but it’s still called Halloween, not Halloween II.

This film also erases the continuity other than the first film, so for the layman it could all get rather confusing, such is the nature of the reboot-quel. I guess after 40 years and multiple reboots, it’s best to not question things and just go with it. That’s made a lot easier once you realize that forgetting many of the Halloween sequels is something audiences wanted to do the minute after they saw them.

In its ribbing fun, this Honest Trailer also acknowledges that the 1978 Halloween is still one of the best horror films ever made, thanks in part to John Carpenter’s direction and his iconic score, as well as Jamie Lee Curtis‘ performance and the enduring nature of Michael Myers.

If you haven’t seen it in a while, give the original Halloween a rewatch to see how well it holds up, and check out the new Halloween from director David Gordon Green, in theaters now. For all the biggest movies still to come in 2018, check out our release schedule.

Watch Prince Harry Gush Over Meghan Markle After Her Speech Today

Another day, another instance of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle being adorable during their grand royal tour of Australia, Fiji, New Zealand, and Tonga. On Wednesday, Meghan gave her first official royal speech of the trip, and used the opportunity to talk about empowering women. After his wife addressed students at the University of South Pacific about the importance of education for women and girls, Prince Harry proved that he, too, was blown away by her talk, heaping praise for Meghan as he skirted around a potentially awkward moment.

According to royal correspondent Omid Scobie, the event’s MC was, apparently, so moved by Meghan’s speech that he forgot to introduce Prince Harry, who was set to address the crowd after the duchess was finished with her own remarks. Harry, fully understanding this gaffe, reportedly cracked a few jokes as he approached the podium. “I thought I got away with it,” he said. “No way that I could follow my wife after that.”

Despite his jokes, Harry used his time at the podium to make an impact, too. “The Commonwealth is all about cooperation and collaboration. Your generation, and our children, will benefit from what you are doing today,” he said, per Scobie.

Meghan also reportedly met with students at the university who have an “interest in youth empowerment,” and reportedly spoke to them about “the importance of young people getting involved in political discussions and empowering students to become job creators not job seekers.” To finish their visit, the royal couple received flower garlands from university students.

This is hardly the first time Prince Harry has played the role of supporting husband during a Meghan Markle moment. At the launch of her cookbook, Together: Our Community Cookbook, in September, Meghan delivered her first speech as a royal, and Harry was once again there, beaming with pride. Luckily, that time the duke didn’t have to take the stage after his incredible wife.

New Closer Look At Thanos’ Intense Makeup From The Avengers Post-Credits Scene

Nowadays, everyone knows who Thanos is. The massive villain finally came head to head with Marvel’s heroes in Avengers: Infinity War, with actor Josh Brolin offering a fascinating and surprisingly vulnerable performance. But The Mad Titan actually made his debut at the tail end of 2012’s The Avengers, appearing in the film’s mysterious post-credits scene.

The Avengers featured actor Damion Poitier playing Thanos, wearing impressive prosthesis instead of the motion capture tech that was settled upon for Infinity War and Avengers 4. Now you can get a better look at Thanos’ original appearance in the MCU, and see how he’s changed since he first gave that evil grin to the camera.

Well, this is awesome. While Thanos’ appearance changed a bit when he finally came through in Avengers: Infinity War, you can’t deny that the visual affects artist did make him resemble the character’s original look. But imagine Josh Brolin wearing that huge mask while filming the Avengers movies back to back.

This awesome behind the scenes photo comes from Ironhead Studio, which makes prosthesis, masks, and costumes for plenty of iconic movie blockbusters. This includes tons of work in the superhero genre, including Joss Whedon’s The Avengers. On top of helping to craft the visuals of that groundbreaking crossover film, Ironhead was also tasked with creating Thanos’ look– a character that wouldn’t be fleshed out for another six years and entire phases of MCU movies later.

While the Thanos mask looks glorious, one has to wonder how practical it would be to film. All the big purple guy had to do in The Avengers was smirk, so it wasn’t required to have realistic speech and emoting capabilities. And since Josh Brolin took the character in so many places in Avengers: Infinity War, it’s clear that the stunning mask wouldn’t have functioned in the context of that massive blockbuster, and showcased his awesome performance

Damion Poitier portrayed Thanos for his brief appearance in The Avengers— years before Josh Brolin ended up joining the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Prior to his acclaimed performance in Infinity War, Brolin was able to get his feet wet in the first Guardians of the Galaxy film, wherein he instructs his forces (including Nebula) to find both Gamora and the Power Stone.

Marvel may sometimes have a problem with its villains, but The Russo Brothers crafted a story for Thanos that was fascinating, and basically focused entirely on the Mad Titan for Avengers: Infinity War. His horrifying quest for mass murder actually comes from a deluded place of concern, as the galaxy is so vastly overpopulated. Furthermore, we saw the softer side to Thanos when he was forced to kill Gamora, in order to acquire the Soul Stone from Red Skull.

Thanos will return to the silver screen when Avengers 4 arrives on May 3rd, 2019. In the meantime, check out our 2019 release list to plan your trips to the movies in the New Year.

David Schwimmer Jokes About Suspect Who Looks Like Ross From Friends

The cast of Friends is known all over the world for their performances on the long-running sitcom, but David Schwimmer surely wasn’t expecting a recent case of mistaken identity that had people suspecting him of theft in Blackpool, England. A Ross Gellar lookalike was spotted allegedly robbing a restaurant, taking off with a flat of cans and (somewhat hilariously) looking straight up at a security camera in the process. David Schwimmer took to social media to exonerate himself in the best way, posting this:

Maybe the real culprit should have dressed as the Holiday Armadillo. There you go, Blackpool law enforcement officers! David Schwimmer couldn’t be robbing a restaurant in England if he was busy robbing a grocery story in New York City. Hey, sometimes a guy with a Ross Geller-ish face just needs a flat of cans without paying for it. Schwimmer’s Twitter post is a response to all the reactions in response to the original Blackpool photo, which had folks on social media chiming in that Schwimmer totally looked like the culprit.

David Schwimmer, who landed a new sitcom role this season as Grace’s boyfriend on the Will & Grace revival, proved he can deliver laughs in real life as well as in front of the camera. I don’t know that many people genuinely thought Schwimmer was in Blackpool to steal a flat of cans, but a lot of people had fun with the idea. In fact, the Dumfries Galloway Police Division had some entertaining comments about the alleged culprit:

In a particularly memorable episode of Friends, Ross claimed to Rachel and Phoebe that he’d mastered the art of Unagi, which Rachel and Phoebe believed was a type of sushi rather than a state of total awareness. Unagi failed to give Ross a jump on his friends more than once, so perhaps it wouldn’t be enough to keep any David Schwimmer-esque criminals out of the reach of the law for long.

The Blackpool Police clearly received at least some suggestions that David Schwimmer was the man behind the robbery, as they shared a response on their Facebook page:

Who says police departments can’t have fun on social media? The Blackpool page even riffed on the unforgettable Friends theme song that may now be stuck in your head for the rest of the day. Their investigation into David Schwimmer’s whereabouts at the time of the crime couldn’t have been too difficult considering he was all the way across the pond!

Another commenter is clearly a fan of Friends, posting a reference to an episode that was quite embarrassing for Ross:

In this particular episode, Ross wore a pair of leather pants on a date. The pants were extremely tight and stuck to his legs when he began sweating. Heading to the bathroom for some air, he found he could not pull his pants back up. Desperately trying a variety of solutions, he wound up putting talcum powder all over his legs to try and absorb the sweat. Unsurprisingly, this did not work, and he did not get a second date.

We can only hope that David Schwimmer continues to stick with acting and avoid falling into a life of crime. You can find him on NBC with the Will & Grace revival, and all ten seasons of Friends are available streaming on Netflix if you’re in the mood for a blast from the Ross Gellar past. There are plenty of current offerings in the fall TV lineup as well.